all about ipv6

Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey

By News Aggregator

We Need You

By Megan Kruse

We need your help! This year Deploy360 turned five years old, and we’re proud of all that we’ve accomplished so far. But we wonder … is it working for YOU? We’re conducting a survey until 30 June to gather your feedback and your success stories. (Oh, and as an added bonus, we’ll do a raffle drawing for a Raspberry Pi if you leave your email address!)

Our mission remains unchanged –to provide real-world deployment information and speed up adoption of technologies like IPv6, DNSSEC, Anti-Spoofing, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. What technologies have you deployed? What’s next? Have you used Deploy360 materials? What can we add to the site to make your lives easier?

We’ve grown a lot over the last five years and we are thankful that so many of you have come along for the ride. We’ve watched IPv6 deployment climb to about 15%, seen our DNSSEC deployment maps turn more and more green, seen our ION Conference attendance grow, and been lucky enough to meet many of you either in person or via our social media channels.

What’s next? Deploy360 is meant to be a tool to help you ease any deployment issues you may have. We exist to serve. So, talk to us and let us know what we can do better!

TAKE THE SURVEY.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey

By Megan Kruse

We Need You

We need your help! This year Deploy360 turned five years old, and we’re proud of all that we’ve accomplished so far. But we wonder … is it working for YOU? We’re conducting a survey until 30 June to gather your feedback and your success stories. (Oh, and as an added bonus, we’ll do a raffle drawing for a Raspberry Pi if you leave your email address!)

Our mission remains unchanged –to provide real-world deployment information and speed up adoption of technologies like IPv6, DNSSEC, Anti-Spoofing, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. What technologies have you deployed? What’s next? Have you used Deploy360 materials? What can we add to the site to make your lives easier?

We’ve grown a lot over the last five years and we are thankful that so many of you have come along for the ride. We’ve watched IPv6 deployment climb to about 15%, seen our DNSSEC deployment maps turn more and more green, seen our ION Conference attendance grow, and been lucky enough to meet many of you either in person or via our social media channels.

What’s next? Deploy360 is meant to be a tool to help you ease any deployment issues you may have. We exist to serve. So, talk to us and let us know what we can do better!

TAKE THE SURVEY.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights

By Aftab Siddiqui

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017, as highlighted in our previous blog post, happened last week on 15th and 16th May in Bangkok, Thailand. Here is the brief recap of the whole event, which helped bring the local community together.

Webcast of 15th May can be found here.

There were more than 160 online registrations for the event and many people watched it online through the live webcast as well.

The event was inaugurated by Dr. Gothom Arya, chairman of the Thailand Network Information Center Foundation (THNICF). In his brief remarks, he highlighted the importance of a neutral internet exchange point in Thailand and how it is affecting the local industry. He thanked all the sponsors and participants.

Next, it was Mr. Takorn Tantasith, Secretary General of National Broadcasting Telecommunication Commission of Thailand (NBTC), a regulatory body. He shared some interesting facts about internet growth in Thailand. By the end of 2016, there were 43 million internet users, a 15% increase over last year. Fixed broadband subscribers were 6.33 million at the end of 2016, with 600,000KM fibre already in place covering 20% of the whole country. He also shared the two main directions of the ministry: auction of additional wireless spectrum and expansion of broadband coverage. By June 2018, over 70,000 villages will get broadband access. Around 30,000 villages are already covered by the private sector as of today; the remaining 40,000 will be covered by the budget from Ministry of Digital Economy and NBTC.

The keynote address was delivered by Andrew Sullivan, a former chair of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) currently working at Oracle-Dyn. The presentation is available here and on the webcast, his talk starts at [50:10]. He shared some insightful details of the two major DDoS attacks faced by Dyn and how they managed to recover from them. He also gave some good advice to the community, asking them to collaborate more and keep communication channels open.

Dion Leung, VP of Business Development at Coriant shared his views on the latest trends in Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market and also shared his company’s product line.

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the IX Update and highlighted the various steps Internet Society has taken in last few years to support the development of internet exchange points in the world. Webcast starts from [3:14:00].

Martin Levy from Cloudflare presented an overview of Cloudflare’s network, its global and local peering policies, the building of its local Thailand site and also shared some very interesting details of their IPv6 switch and how Cloudflare turned it on by default and how it impacted IPv6 traffic globally. His presentation is available here and his talks start at [4:52:00] on the webcast.

The last session of the day was a panel discussion on the topic of Data Center in Thailand. Moderated by Dr. Jesada Sivaraks (Secretary of Vice Chairman of NBTC), panelists included Prasong Ruangsirikulchai (Senior VP of 1-to-all, former VP of Telecommunication of Thailand Association), Dr. Adisak Srinakarin (Executive Vice President of Electronic Government Agency, Thailand), Tuang Cheevatadavirut (Member of International Data Corporation – IDC Thailand) and Charlie Chairatanatrai (GM Interlink Data Centre). The important highlight if this session was the presentation of Dr. Adisak on Thailand Digital Government Development Plan (2017-2021). The panel discussion lasted for more than two hours and was very informative. Webcast starts from [6:07:00].

Webcast of 16th May can be found here.

The first session of the second day was from Andy Davidson (Asteroid, LONAP). He presented BGP Traffic Engineering while sharing his experience of using different tools and techniques to measure traffic, how to manage capacity demands, ensure the quality of service to end users, recover from failures, decide when to peer and with whom, and how to make a sensible and calculated decision.

Walt Wollny from Hurricane Electric presented the BGP Tool Kit from HE [bgp.he.net] and how it can be used to get the right information. His webcast starts at [1:01:00].

Fakrul Alam from APNIC shared his experience on various community tools to fight against DDoS attacks such as putting the right bogon filters, having a good view of your network traffic through flow sonar and how to getting traffic scrubbing services to remove unwanted traffic. His webcast starts from [2:22:00].

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the MANRS initiative (Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security). He also shared the data for Thailand from CAIDA’s Spoofer project and highlighted the spoofed prefixes coming out of Thailand and also presented the list of bogus prefixes and ASNs generating from Thailand from CIDR Report. Webcast of this presentation starts at [2:40:00].

Dr. Philip Smith chaired a panel discussion on “Peering Tools and Best Practices” with panelists Che-Hoo Cheng (APNIC), Martin Levy (Cloudflare), Sokvantha Youk (TelcoTech), Kittinan Sriprasert (BKNIX), and Johnathan Lee (TIME). Webcast for this panel discussion starts at [4:31:00].

Somchai Treerattananukool from Symphony (also part of the MCT management committee) presented the “Submarine cable expansion in Asia”. He shared some interesting statistics about Thailand internet growth and forecast. As per the stats from NECTEC the current bandwidth usage of Thailand is around 2.5Tbps and increasing 40% every year. Thailand is using 44% of internet capacity from Singapore hub and 28% from Malaysia hub, while the capacity is increasing on Malaysian hub. He shared the update about the MCT Submarine Cable (Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia) and others in the pipeline. Webcast for this presentation starts at [6:48:00].

Finally, there was a presentation from Kohei Kitade of NTT Communications about “internet traffic expansion and submarine cables” where he shared the status of various submarine cable systems in the region.

It was a wonderful event, full of informative sessions and time to meet with industry leaders. We hope to see a larger crowd at BKNIX Peering Forum 2018.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights

By News Aggregator

By Aftab Siddiqui

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017, as highlighted in our previous blog post, happened last week on 15th and 16th May in Bangkok, Thailand. Here is the brief recap of the whole event, which helped bring the local community together.

Webcast of 15th May can be found here.

There were more than 160 online registrations for the event and many people watched it online through the live webcast as well.

The event was inaugurated by Dr. Gothom Arya, chairman of the Thailand Network Information Center Foundation (THNICF). In his brief remarks, he highlighted the importance of a neutral internet exchange point in Thailand and how it is affecting the local industry. He thanked all the sponsors and participants.

Next, it was Mr. Takorn Tantasith, Secretary General of National Broadcasting Telecommunication Commission of Thailand (NBTC), a regulatory body. He shared some interesting facts about internet growth in Thailand. By the end of 2016, there were 43 million internet users, a 15% increase over last year. Fixed broadband subscribers were 6.33 million at the end of 2016, with 600,000KM fibre already in place covering 20% of the whole country. He also shared the two main directions of the ministry: auction of additional wireless spectrum and expansion of broadband coverage. By June 2018, over 70,000 villages will get broadband access. Around 30,000 villages are already covered by the private sector as of today; the remaining 40,000 will be covered by the budget from Ministry of Digital Economy and NBTC.

The keynote address was delivered by Andrew Sullivan, a former chair of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) currently working at Oracle-Dyn. The presentation is available here and on the webcast, his talk starts at [50:10]. He shared some insightful details of the two major DDoS attacks faced by Dyn and how they managed to recover from them. He also gave some good advice to the community, asking them to collaborate more and keep communication channels open.

Dion Leung, VP of Business Development at Coriant shared his views on the latest trends in Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market and also shared his company’s product line.

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the IX Update and highlighted the various steps Internet Society has taken in last few years to support the development of internet exchange points in the world. Webcast starts from [3:14:00].

Martin Levy from Cloudflare presented an overview of Cloudflare’s network, its global and local peering policies, the building of its local Thailand site and also shared some very interesting details of their IPv6 switch and how Cloudflare turned it on by default and how it impacted IPv6 traffic globally. His presentation is available here and his talks start at [4:52:00] on the webcast.

The last session of the day was a panel discussion on the topic of Data Center in Thailand. Moderated by Dr. Jesada Sivaraks (Secretary of Vice Chairman of NBTC), panelists included Prasong Ruangsirikulchai (Senior VP of 1-to-all, former VP of Telecommunication of Thailand Association), Dr. Adisak Srinakarin (Executive Vice President of Electronic Government Agency, Thailand), Tuang Cheevatadavirut (Member of International Data Corporation – IDC Thailand) and Charlie Chairatanatrai (GM Interlink Data Centre). The important highlight if this session was the presentation of Dr. Adisak on Thailand Digital Government Development Plan (2017-2021). The panel discussion lasted for more than two hours and was very informative. Webcast starts from [6:07:00].

Webcast of 16th May can be found here.

The first session of the second day was from Andy Davidson (Asteroid, LONAP). He presented BGP Traffic Engineering while sharing his experience of using different tools and techniques to measure traffic, how to manage capacity demands, ensure the quality of service to end users, recover from failures, decide when to peer and with whom, and how to make a sensible and calculated decision.

Walt Wollny from Hurricane Electric presented the BGP Tool Kit from HE [bgp.he.net] and how it can be used to get the right information. His webcast starts at [1:01:00].

Fakrul Alam from APNIC shared his experience on various community tools to fight against DDoS attacks such as putting the right bogon filters, having a good view of your network traffic through flow sonar and how to getting traffic scrubbing services to remove unwanted traffic. His webcast starts from [2:22:00].

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the MANRS initiative (Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security). He also shared the data for Thailand from CAIDA’s Spoofer project and highlighted the spoofed prefixes coming out of Thailand and also presented the list of bogus prefixes and ASNs generating from Thailand from CIDR Report. Webcast of this presentation starts at [2:40:00].

Dr. Philip Smith chaired a panel discussion on “Peering Tools and Best Practices” with panelists Che-Hoo Cheng (APNIC), Martin Levy (Cloudflare), Sokvantha Youk (TelcoTech), Kittinan Sriprasert (BKNIX), and Johnathan Lee (TIME). Webcast for this panel discussion starts at [4:31:00].

Somchai Treerattananukool from Symphony (also part of the MCT management committee) presented the “Submarine cable expansion in Asia”. He shared some interesting statistics about Thailand internet growth and forecast. As per the stats from NECTEC the current bandwidth usage of Thailand is around 2.5Tbps and increasing 40% every year. Thailand is using 44% of internet capacity from Singapore hub and 28% from Malaysia hub, while the capacity is increasing on Malaysian hub. He shared the update about the MCT Submarine Cable (Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia) and others in the pipeline. Webcast for this presentation starts at [6:48:00].

Finally, there was a presentation from Kohei Kitade of NTT Communications about “internet traffic expansion and submarine cables” where he shared the status of various submarine cable systems in the region.

It was a wonderful event, full of informative sessions and time to meet with industry leaders. We hope to see a larger crowd at BKNIX Peering Forum 2018.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE

By Kevin Meynell

The 13th Caribbean Network Operators’ Group (CaribNOG 13) was held on 18-19 April 2017 in Barbados. Around 30 participants from around the Caribbean came together to discuss operational issues and share expertise about evolving the Internet in the region, which was sponsored by the Internet Society along with others.

Kevin Meynell from the Deploy360 team attended the event and presented on Let’s Encrypt which is a free, automated and open Certificate Authority (CA) that’s encouraging the deployment of TLS and encrypted Internet communications. The aim is to have 100% of Internet encrypted, and CAs are currently need to validate domains and link them with the public keys used to establish encrypted connections.

The other benefit of Let’s Encrypt is that it uses the Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) to provide an API for requesting, validating, revoking and otherwise managing certificates. This is also currently being standardised through the IETF.

The inherent weakness of using any CA though, is they’re third parties that are able to issue certificates for any name or organisation. DANE is a protocol that instead allows certificates to be cryptographically bound to DNS names, and as we’ve discussed before, can be used in conjunction with Let’s Encrypt certificates to facilitate encrypted communications between hosts validated with DNSSEC.

There were a couple of other presentations with Deploy360 relevance. Kevon Swift (LACNIC) provided an overview on IPv6 Deployment and Impact in the LAC region. IPv6 deployment in the LAC region still remained fairly low, although Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago were in the Top 20 countries for IPv6 deployment with rates between 15 and 20%.

LACNIC had therefore commissioned a report in conjunction with the Development Bank of Latin America to examine IPv6 deployment in the region. This had led to several recommendations that included adjustments to regulatory frameworks and policies to facilitate IPv6 deployment, more support for research and education networks who were agents for innovation, and develop road maps to encourage timely transition to IPv6.

The other presentation was from Mark Kosters (ARIN) about Cloud Computing and DNSSEC Considerations. This discussed the issues of using DNSSEC with shared systems and how to ensure you have the right connections for sensitive information. How also does a cloud provider ensure isolation between clients?

Last but not least, we should also mention that our colleague Shernon Osepa from ISOC’s Latin America and Caribbean Bureau was at the meeting too, and provided an update on our activities in the Caribbean.

All the presentations from the meeting can be found on the CaribNOG website.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE

By News Aggregator

By Kevin Meynell

The 13th Caribbean Network Operators’ Group (CaribNOG 13) was held on 18-19 April 2017 in Barbados. Around 30 participants from around the Caribbean came together to discuss operational issues and share expertise about evolving the Internet in the region, which was sponsored by the Internet Society along with others.

Kevin Meynell from the Deploy360 team attended the event and presented on Let’s Encrypt which is a free, automated and open Certificate Authority (CA) that’s encouraging the deployment of TLS and encrypted Internet communications. The aim is to have 100% of Internet encrypted, and CAs are currently need to validate domains and link them with the public keys used to establish encrypted connections.

The other benefit of Let’s Encrypt is that it uses the Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) to provide an API for requesting, validating, revoking and otherwise managing certificates. This is also currently being standardised through the IETF.

The inherent weakness of using any CA though, is they’re third parties that are able to issue certificates for any name or organisation. DANE is a protocol that instead allows certificates to be cryptographically bound to DNS names, and as we’ve discussed before, can be used in conjunction with Let’s Encrypt certificates to facilitate encrypted communications between hosts validated with DNSSEC.

There were a couple of other presentations with Deploy360 relevance. Kevon Swift (LACNIC) provided an overview on IPv6 Deployment and Impact in the LAC region. IPv6 deployment in the LAC region still remained fairly low, although Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago were in the Top 20 countries for IPv6 deployment with rates between 15 and 20%.

LACNIC had therefore commissioned a report in conjunction with the Development Bank of Latin America to examine IPv6 deployment in the region. This had led to several recommendations that included adjustments to regulatory frameworks and policies to facilitate IPv6 deployment, more support for research and education networks who were agents for innovation, and develop road maps to encourage timely transition to IPv6.

The other presentation was from Mark Kosters (ARIN) about Cloud Computing and DNSSEC Considerations. This discussed the issues of using DNSSEC with shared systems and how to ensure you have the right connections for sensitive information. How also does a cloud provider ensure isolation between clients?

Last but not least, we should also mention that our colleague Shernon Osepa from ISOC’s Latin America and Caribbean Bureau was at the meeting too, and provided an update on our activities in the Caribbean.

All the presentations from the meeting can be found on the CaribNOG website.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Versa Networks Infuses SD-WAN and SD-Security with IPv6

By Kumar Mehta

Google IPv6 Stats 2015-2017

At Versa Networks we recently announced that we now offer support for IPv6, making us one of the few companies that provide support for both IPv4- and IPv6-based SD-WANs. I believe this support will become increasingly important to the digital transformation that is unfolding as new Internet of Things (IoT) devices are deployed into network environments, and exhaustion of the IPv4 address space continues. I think we will see a substantial increase in competition for IP addresses as more “things” become connected and centrally managed, and this move will hopefully keep Versa Networks ahead of the curve.

You don’t have to take my word for it – In the last year, IDC has seen “… tremendous momentum in the influence of digital transformation (DX) on technology spending across geographies and industries.” As the report explains, “Technology is transforming the business by blending the digital with physical with transformative use cases like IoT and next-generation security…IDC believes the key to succeeding in the new digital economy will be the ability to rapidly respond to changes within your ecosystem.” IDC estimates, “… there is the potential for over $18 trillion of new value to be harvested.”

IHS Technology’s 2016 whitepaper, IoT Platforms – Enabling the Internet of Things, looks at the growth of IoT and finds a similar spike. The report predicts that we will see 30.7 billion IoT devices by 2020 and 74.4 billion devices by 2025. Because I want to make sure we have the capacity to serve our clients, IPv6 was the obvious choice.

It is astonishing how far we have come in just a few short decades. When IPv4 was introduced, it was designed to accommodate around 4.3 billion addresses, which back then probably seemed like an adequate number to future proof the protocol for years to come. But what the creators couldn’t have predicted was the explosive growth of mobile devices and the ‘always on’ Internet-connected devices (IoT), each of which requires its own unique address. With IPv4 exhaustion a reality in most geographies, I knew it was time to turn to IPv6.

It turns out I am not the only one to reach this decision. IPv6 adoption stands at 32.2 percent in the U.S., and in many European countries with the highest adoption rates, it ranges from 28 to 47 percent. Given SD-WAN technology’s integration of Internet connectivity, IPv6 will be essential to Versa Networks long-term success. In addition to US-based multiple-system operators, web providers and content providers, Asian customers are also in need of an SD-WAN solution that supports IPv6 for both connectivity and services. Many MSOs support an IPv6 underlay for their customer base and often offer special services for customers connected to IPv6.

Adopting an IPv6-ready SD-WAN/SD-Security solution allows for significant improvement in an organization’s Internet experiences. The advice I give all my customers is this, “If you are embarking on a new service, it should be dual stack from the get-go.”

By supporting both IPv4 and IPv6 for SD-WAN and SD-Security, Versa can now offer customers the flexibility to design their WAN under IPv4 today and protect it from obsolescence as they switch over to IPv6. And by deploying our technology, customers will be able to avoid expensive and time-consuming vendor swap-out scenarios.

IPv6 does come with some hurdles and not all organizations are immune. As a technology provider, the challenges Versa needed to solve were early on in development and testing. The multi-faceted problems that SD-WAN focuses on solving: connectivity, SaaS and cloud optimization and security; brought a level of challenges in appropriately testing our IPv6 capabilities. We realized that we initially didn’t have everything to ensure we could test IPv6 thoroughly from an SD-WAN use case. We needed to look more deeply into our test equipment, points of access to leverage (providers) and how various applications would be treated across an IPv6-based architecture. Very much like our customers, we found that IPv6 isn’t something you can just “turn-on” and run. You need to look at your applications, underlay infrastructure, security policies and your circuit providers. It took some effort and time to restructure our environments appropriately so that enterprise use-cases could be replicated and drive our efforts for a successful IPv6 implementation. Happy to say, our efforts paid off and we have a very comprehensive IPv4 and IPv6 SD-WAN and SD-security offering for the market.

The post Versa Networks Infuses SD-WAN and SD-Security with IPv6 appeared first on Team ARIN.

Read more here:: teamarin.net/feed/

Versa Networks Infuses SD-WAN and SD-Security with IPv6

By News Aggregator

Google IPv6 Stats 2015-2017

By Kumar Mehta

At Versa Networks we recently announced that we now offer support for IPv6, making us one of the few companies that provide support for both IPv4- and IPv6-based SD-WANs. I believe this support will become increasingly important to the digital transformation that is unfolding as new Internet of Things (IoT) devices are deployed into network environments, and exhaustion of the IPv4 address space continues. I think we will see a substantial increase in competition for IP addresses as more “things” become connected and centrally managed, and this move will hopefully keep Versa Networks ahead of the curve.

You don’t have to take my word for it – In the last year, IDC has seen “… tremendous momentum in the influence of digital transformation (DX) on technology spending across geographies and industries.” As the report explains, “Technology is transforming the business by blending the digital with physical with transformative use cases like IoT and next-generation security…IDC believes the key to succeeding in the new digital economy will be the ability to rapidly respond to changes within your ecosystem.” IDC estimates, “… there is the potential for over $18 trillion of new value to be harvested.”

IHS Technology’s 2016 whitepaper, IoT Platforms – Enabling the Internet of Things, looks at the growth of IoT and finds a similar spike. The report predicts that we will see 30.7 billion IoT devices by 2020 and 74.4 billion devices by 2025. Because I want to make sure we have the capacity to serve our clients, IPv6 was the obvious choice.

It is astonishing how far we have come in just a few short decades. When IPv4 was introduced, it was designed to accommodate around 4.3 billion addresses, which back then probably seemed like an adequate number to future proof the protocol for years to come. But what the creators couldn’t have predicted was the explosive growth of mobile devices and the ‘always on’ Internet-connected devices (IoT), each of which requires its own unique address. With IPv4 exhaustion a reality in most geographies, I knew it was time to turn to IPv6.

It turns out I am not the only one to reach this decision. IPv6 adoption stands at 32.2 percent in the U.S., and in many European countries with the highest adoption rates, it ranges from 28 to 47 percent. Given SD-WAN technology’s integration of Internet connectivity, IPv6 will be essential to Versa Networks long-term success. In addition to US-based multiple-system operators, web providers and content providers, Asian customers are also in need of an SD-WAN solution that supports IPv6 for both connectivity and services. Many MSOs support an IPv6 underlay for their customer base and often offer special services for customers connected to IPv6.

Adopting an IPv6-ready SD-WAN/SD-Security solution allows for significant improvement in an organization’s Internet experiences. The advice I give all my customers is this, “If you are embarking on a new service, it should be dual stack from the get-go.”

By supporting both IPv4 and IPv6 for SD-WAN and SD-Security, Versa can now offer customers the flexibility to design their WAN under IPv4 today and protect it from obsolescence as they switch over to IPv6. And by deploying our technology, customers will be able to avoid expensive and time-consuming vendor swap-out scenarios.

IPv6 does come with some hurdles and not all organizations are immune. As a technology provider, the challenges Versa needed to solve were early on in development and testing. The multi-faceted problems that SD-WAN focuses on solving: connectivity, SaaS and cloud optimization and security; brought a level of challenges in appropriately testing our IPv6 capabilities. We realized that we initially didn’t have everything to ensure we could test IPv6 thoroughly from an SD-WAN use case. We needed to look more deeply into our test equipment, points of access to leverage (providers) and how various applications would be treated across an IPv6-based architecture. Very much like our customers, we found that IPv6 isn’t something you can just “turn-on” and run. You need to look at your applications, underlay infrastructure, security policies and your circuit providers. It took some effort and time to restructure our environments appropriately so that enterprise use-cases could be replicated and drive our efforts for a successful IPv6 implementation. Happy to say, our efforts paid off and we have a very comprehensive IPv4 and IPv6 SD-WAN and SD-security offering for the market.

The post Versa Networks Infuses SD-WAN and SD-Security with IPv6 appeared first on Team ARIN.

Read more here:: teamarin.net/feed/

The post Versa Networks Infuses SD-WAN and SD-Security with IPv6 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Smart & Safe City

By IoT Now Magazine

Event date: June 7 – 8, 2017 The Hague, Netherlands The 7th edition of the large scale Smart & Safe City Event on 7 and 8 June offers smart and safe solutions for the city of the future. Meet 1,000 experts and colleagues: inspire each other and create new ideas. Learn from more than 30 practical […]

The post Smart & Safe City appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Read more here:: www.m2mnow.biz/feed/

Smart & Safe City

By News Aggregator

By IoT Now Magazine

Event date: June 7 – 8, 2017 The Hague, Netherlands The 7th edition of the large scale Smart & Safe City Event on 7 and 8 June offers smart and safe solutions for the city of the future. Meet 1,000 experts and colleagues: inspire each other and create new ideas. Learn from more than 30 practical […]

The post Smart & Safe City appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Read more here:: www.m2mnow.biz/feed/

The post Smart & Safe City appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator