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Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey

By Megan Kruse

We Need You

We need your help! This year Deploy360 turned five years old, and we’re proud of all that we’ve accomplished so far. But we wonder … is it working for YOU? We’re conducting a survey until 30 June to gather your feedback and your success stories. (Oh, and as an added bonus, we’ll do a raffle drawing for a Raspberry Pi if you leave your email address!)

Our mission remains unchanged –to provide real-world deployment information and speed up adoption of technologies like IPv6, DNSSEC, Anti-Spoofing, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. What technologies have you deployed? What’s next? Have you used Deploy360 materials? What can we add to the site to make your lives easier?

We’ve grown a lot over the last five years and we are thankful that so many of you have come along for the ride. We’ve watched IPv6 deployment climb to about 15%, seen our DNSSEC deployment maps turn more and more green, seen our ION Conference attendance grow, and been lucky enough to meet many of you either in person or via our social media channels.

What’s next? Deploy360 is meant to be a tool to help you ease any deployment issues you may have. We exist to serve. So, talk to us and let us know what we can do better!

TAKE THE SURVEY.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey

By News Aggregator

We Need You

By Megan Kruse

We need your help! This year Deploy360 turned five years old, and we’re proud of all that we’ve accomplished so far. But we wonder … is it working for YOU? We’re conducting a survey until 30 June to gather your feedback and your success stories. (Oh, and as an added bonus, we’ll do a raffle drawing for a Raspberry Pi if you leave your email address!)

Our mission remains unchanged –to provide real-world deployment information and speed up adoption of technologies like IPv6, DNSSEC, Anti-Spoofing, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. What technologies have you deployed? What’s next? Have you used Deploy360 materials? What can we add to the site to make your lives easier?

We’ve grown a lot over the last five years and we are thankful that so many of you have come along for the ride. We’ve watched IPv6 deployment climb to about 15%, seen our DNSSEC deployment maps turn more and more green, seen our ION Conference attendance grow, and been lucky enough to meet many of you either in person or via our social media channels.

What’s next? Deploy360 is meant to be a tool to help you ease any deployment issues you may have. We exist to serve. So, talk to us and let us know what we can do better!

TAKE THE SURVEY.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Help Us Help You – Take The Deploy360 Survey appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Google buys a /12 IPv4 Address Block

By Aftab Siddiqui

As per the RIPE Stat – BGPlay, Merit Network Inc (AS237) withdrew its advertisement of 35.192.0.0/11 on 18 October 2016. It didn’t ring any bells because they have plenty of IPv4 address space, but on 21 March 2017, ARIN announced that 35.192.0.0/12 has been added to the transferred list.

As no-one was advertising this block on the Internet, it was unclear who’d bought such a big block and at what price. On 29 April 2017, Andree Toonk (founder of BGPMon) tweeted about this announcement and surprisingly enough it was announced by Google.

More digging in RIPE Stat – BGPlay suggests that Google started announcing 35.192.0.0/13, 35.200.0.0/14, 35.204.0.0/15 from AS15169 on 12 April 2017. As per the Whois information, Google has allocated this block for Google Cloud customers *** The IP addresses under this Org-ID are in use by Google Cloud customers ***

This transaction of more than a million IPv4 addresses started a debate why Google had to make this move when their IPv6 stats suggest that IPv6 deployment is increasing worldwide and most of their services are already available through IPv6.

The above graph from the Google IPv6 Statistics shows a growth of almost 7% in the last 12 months. This looks great but is that enough? The answer is of course not. Other statistics from the APNIC IPv6 Measurement Map show another side of IPv6 deployment status around the world. It is much better than previous years and it’s improving every month but is still not close to satisfactory.

Google has to serve its customers all around the world and if those customers don’t have IPv6 then they need to give them the option of IPv4. As rightly commented by Mark Smith on the AusNOG mailing list,

“The reason why I think Google buying the /12 is significant, despite Google services being thoroughly IPv6 enabled for quite a while, they’re not buying those IPv4 addresses to solve their own lack of IPv6 deployment. They’re trying to overcome others lack of IPv6 deployment, and paying a large amount of money to mostly solve somebody else’s problem rather than their own. I can only see them and others in a similar situation tolerating those costs for a limited time. They have a financial motivation to actively minimise or avoid those costs sooner rather than later.”

To summarise the discussion, whether it’s Google or any other major cloud or content provider, they can’t serve you IPv4 forever and may give up on you sooner or later. If you are an ISP not providing IPv6 to their customers then your customer will move to another ISP, and this is only a matter of time.

If you want to find out more about how to deploy IPv6 in your network, you can check out our IPv6 resources, attend any of our upcoming IPv6 training (workshop/tutorial) around the world, or reach out to us and let us know how can we help.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

Google buys a /12 IPv4 Address Block

By News Aggregator

By Aftab Siddiqui

As per the RIPE Stat – BGPlay, Merit Network Inc (AS237) withdrew its advertisement of 35.192.0.0/11 on 18 October 2016. It didn’t ring any bells because they have plenty of IPv4 address space, but on 21 March 2017, ARIN announced that 35.192.0.0/12 has been added to the transferred list.

As no-one was advertising this block on the Internet, it was unclear who’d bought such a big block and at what price. On 29 April 2017, Andree Toonk (founder of BGPMon) tweeted about this announcement and surprisingly enough it was announced by Google.

More digging in RIPE Stat – BGPlay suggests that Google started announcing 35.192.0.0/13, 35.200.0.0/14, 35.204.0.0/15 from AS15169 on 12 April 2017. As per the Whois information, Google has allocated this block for Google Cloud customers *** The IP addresses under this Org-ID are in use by Google Cloud customers ***

This transaction of more than a million IPv4 addresses started a debate why Google had to make this move when their IPv6 stats suggest that IPv6 deployment is increasing worldwide and most of their services are already available through IPv6.

The above graph from the Google IPv6 Statistics shows a growth of almost 7% in the last 12 months. This looks great but is that enough? The answer is of course not. Other statistics from the APNIC IPv6 Measurement Map show another side of IPv6 deployment status around the world. It is much better than previous years and it’s improving every month but is still not close to satisfactory.

Google has to serve its customers all around the world and if those customers don’t have IPv6 then they need to give them the option of IPv4. As rightly commented by Mark Smith on the AusNOG mailing list,

“The reason why I think Google buying the /12 is significant, despite Google services being thoroughly IPv6 enabled for quite a while, they’re not buying those IPv4 addresses to solve their own lack of IPv6 deployment. They’re trying to overcome others lack of IPv6 deployment, and paying a large amount of money to mostly solve somebody else’s problem rather than their own. I can only see them and others in a similar situation tolerating those costs for a limited time. They have a financial motivation to actively minimise or avoid those costs sooner rather than later.”

To summarise the discussion, whether it’s Google or any other major cloud or content provider, they can’t serve you IPv4 forever and may give up on you sooner or later. If you are an ISP not providing IPv6 to their customers then your customer will move to another ISP, and this is only a matter of time.

If you want to find out more about how to deploy IPv6 in your network, you can check out our IPv6 resources, attend any of our upcoming IPv6 training (workshop/tutorial) around the world, or reach out to us and let us know how can we help.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Google buys a /12 IPv4 Address Block appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights

By News Aggregator

By Aftab Siddiqui

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017, as highlighted in our previous blog post, happened last week on 15th and 16th May in Bangkok, Thailand. Here is the brief recap of the whole event, which helped bring the local community together.

Webcast of 15th May can be found here.

There were more than 160 online registrations for the event and many people watched it online through the live webcast as well.

The event was inaugurated by Dr. Gothom Arya, chairman of the Thailand Network Information Center Foundation (THNICF). In his brief remarks, he highlighted the importance of a neutral internet exchange point in Thailand and how it is affecting the local industry. He thanked all the sponsors and participants.

Next, it was Mr. Takorn Tantasith, Secretary General of National Broadcasting Telecommunication Commission of Thailand (NBTC), a regulatory body. He shared some interesting facts about internet growth in Thailand. By the end of 2016, there were 43 million internet users, a 15% increase over last year. Fixed broadband subscribers were 6.33 million at the end of 2016, with 600,000KM fibre already in place covering 20% of the whole country. He also shared the two main directions of the ministry: auction of additional wireless spectrum and expansion of broadband coverage. By June 2018, over 70,000 villages will get broadband access. Around 30,000 villages are already covered by the private sector as of today; the remaining 40,000 will be covered by the budget from Ministry of Digital Economy and NBTC.

The keynote address was delivered by Andrew Sullivan, a former chair of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) currently working at Oracle-Dyn. The presentation is available here and on the webcast, his talk starts at [50:10]. He shared some insightful details of the two major DDoS attacks faced by Dyn and how they managed to recover from them. He also gave some good advice to the community, asking them to collaborate more and keep communication channels open.

Dion Leung, VP of Business Development at Coriant shared his views on the latest trends in Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market and also shared his company’s product line.

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the IX Update and highlighted the various steps Internet Society has taken in last few years to support the development of internet exchange points in the world. Webcast starts from [3:14:00].

Martin Levy from Cloudflare presented an overview of Cloudflare’s network, its global and local peering policies, the building of its local Thailand site and also shared some very interesting details of their IPv6 switch and how Cloudflare turned it on by default and how it impacted IPv6 traffic globally. His presentation is available here and his talks start at [4:52:00] on the webcast.

The last session of the day was a panel discussion on the topic of Data Center in Thailand. Moderated by Dr. Jesada Sivaraks (Secretary of Vice Chairman of NBTC), panelists included Prasong Ruangsirikulchai (Senior VP of 1-to-all, former VP of Telecommunication of Thailand Association), Dr. Adisak Srinakarin (Executive Vice President of Electronic Government Agency, Thailand), Tuang Cheevatadavirut (Member of International Data Corporation – IDC Thailand) and Charlie Chairatanatrai (GM Interlink Data Centre). The important highlight if this session was the presentation of Dr. Adisak on Thailand Digital Government Development Plan (2017-2021). The panel discussion lasted for more than two hours and was very informative. Webcast starts from [6:07:00].

Webcast of 16th May can be found here.

The first session of the second day was from Andy Davidson (Asteroid, LONAP). He presented BGP Traffic Engineering while sharing his experience of using different tools and techniques to measure traffic, how to manage capacity demands, ensure the quality of service to end users, recover from failures, decide when to peer and with whom, and how to make a sensible and calculated decision.

Walt Wollny from Hurricane Electric presented the BGP Tool Kit from HE [bgp.he.net] and how it can be used to get the right information. His webcast starts at [1:01:00].

Fakrul Alam from APNIC shared his experience on various community tools to fight against DDoS attacks such as putting the right bogon filters, having a good view of your network traffic through flow sonar and how to getting traffic scrubbing services to remove unwanted traffic. His webcast starts from [2:22:00].

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the MANRS initiative (Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security). He also shared the data for Thailand from CAIDA’s Spoofer project and highlighted the spoofed prefixes coming out of Thailand and also presented the list of bogus prefixes and ASNs generating from Thailand from CIDR Report. Webcast of this presentation starts at [2:40:00].

Dr. Philip Smith chaired a panel discussion on “Peering Tools and Best Practices” with panelists Che-Hoo Cheng (APNIC), Martin Levy (Cloudflare), Sokvantha Youk (TelcoTech), Kittinan Sriprasert (BKNIX), and Johnathan Lee (TIME). Webcast for this panel discussion starts at [4:31:00].

Somchai Treerattananukool from Symphony (also part of the MCT management committee) presented the “Submarine cable expansion in Asia”. He shared some interesting statistics about Thailand internet growth and forecast. As per the stats from NECTEC the current bandwidth usage of Thailand is around 2.5Tbps and increasing 40% every year. Thailand is using 44% of internet capacity from Singapore hub and 28% from Malaysia hub, while the capacity is increasing on Malaysian hub. He shared the update about the MCT Submarine Cable (Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia) and others in the pipeline. Webcast for this presentation starts at [6:48:00].

Finally, there was a presentation from Kohei Kitade of NTT Communications about “internet traffic expansion and submarine cables” where he shared the status of various submarine cable systems in the region.

It was a wonderful event, full of informative sessions and time to meet with industry leaders. We hope to see a larger crowd at BKNIX Peering Forum 2018.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017 – Highlights

By Aftab Siddiqui

BKNIX Peering Forum 2017, as highlighted in our previous blog post, happened last week on 15th and 16th May in Bangkok, Thailand. Here is the brief recap of the whole event, which helped bring the local community together.

Webcast of 15th May can be found here.

There were more than 160 online registrations for the event and many people watched it online through the live webcast as well.

The event was inaugurated by Dr. Gothom Arya, chairman of the Thailand Network Information Center Foundation (THNICF). In his brief remarks, he highlighted the importance of a neutral internet exchange point in Thailand and how it is affecting the local industry. He thanked all the sponsors and participants.

Next, it was Mr. Takorn Tantasith, Secretary General of National Broadcasting Telecommunication Commission of Thailand (NBTC), a regulatory body. He shared some interesting facts about internet growth in Thailand. By the end of 2016, there were 43 million internet users, a 15% increase over last year. Fixed broadband subscribers were 6.33 million at the end of 2016, with 600,000KM fibre already in place covering 20% of the whole country. He also shared the two main directions of the ministry: auction of additional wireless spectrum and expansion of broadband coverage. By June 2018, over 70,000 villages will get broadband access. Around 30,000 villages are already covered by the private sector as of today; the remaining 40,000 will be covered by the budget from Ministry of Digital Economy and NBTC.

The keynote address was delivered by Andrew Sullivan, a former chair of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) currently working at Oracle-Dyn. The presentation is available here and on the webcast, his talk starts at [50:10]. He shared some insightful details of the two major DDoS attacks faced by Dyn and how they managed to recover from them. He also gave some good advice to the community, asking them to collaborate more and keep communication channels open.

Dion Leung, VP of Business Development at Coriant shared his views on the latest trends in Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market and also shared his company’s product line.

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the IX Update and highlighted the various steps Internet Society has taken in last few years to support the development of internet exchange points in the world. Webcast starts from [3:14:00].

Martin Levy from Cloudflare presented an overview of Cloudflare’s network, its global and local peering policies, the building of its local Thailand site and also shared some very interesting details of their IPv6 switch and how Cloudflare turned it on by default and how it impacted IPv6 traffic globally. His presentation is available here and his talks start at [4:52:00] on the webcast.

The last session of the day was a panel discussion on the topic of Data Center in Thailand. Moderated by Dr. Jesada Sivaraks (Secretary of Vice Chairman of NBTC), panelists included Prasong Ruangsirikulchai (Senior VP of 1-to-all, former VP of Telecommunication of Thailand Association), Dr. Adisak Srinakarin (Executive Vice President of Electronic Government Agency, Thailand), Tuang Cheevatadavirut (Member of International Data Corporation – IDC Thailand) and Charlie Chairatanatrai (GM Interlink Data Centre). The important highlight if this session was the presentation of Dr. Adisak on Thailand Digital Government Development Plan (2017-2021). The panel discussion lasted for more than two hours and was very informative. Webcast starts from [6:07:00].

Webcast of 16th May can be found here.

The first session of the second day was from Andy Davidson (Asteroid, LONAP). He presented BGP Traffic Engineering while sharing his experience of using different tools and techniques to measure traffic, how to manage capacity demands, ensure the quality of service to end users, recover from failures, decide when to peer and with whom, and how to make a sensible and calculated decision.

Walt Wollny from Hurricane Electric presented the BGP Tool Kit from HE [bgp.he.net] and how it can be used to get the right information. His webcast starts at [1:01:00].

Fakrul Alam from APNIC shared his experience on various community tools to fight against DDoS attacks such as putting the right bogon filters, having a good view of your network traffic through flow sonar and how to getting traffic scrubbing services to remove unwanted traffic. His webcast starts from [2:22:00].

Aftab Siddiqui from Deploy360 presented the MANRS initiative (Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security). He also shared the data for Thailand from CAIDA’s Spoofer project and highlighted the spoofed prefixes coming out of Thailand and also presented the list of bogus prefixes and ASNs generating from Thailand from CIDR Report. Webcast of this presentation starts at [2:40:00].

Dr. Philip Smith chaired a panel discussion on “Peering Tools and Best Practices” with panelists Che-Hoo Cheng (APNIC), Martin Levy (Cloudflare), Sokvantha Youk (TelcoTech), Kittinan Sriprasert (BKNIX), and Johnathan Lee (TIME). Webcast for this panel discussion starts at [4:31:00].

Somchai Treerattananukool from Symphony (also part of the MCT management committee) presented the “Submarine cable expansion in Asia”. He shared some interesting statistics about Thailand internet growth and forecast. As per the stats from NECTEC the current bandwidth usage of Thailand is around 2.5Tbps and increasing 40% every year. Thailand is using 44% of internet capacity from Singapore hub and 28% from Malaysia hub, while the capacity is increasing on Malaysian hub. He shared the update about the MCT Submarine Cable (Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia) and others in the pipeline. Webcast for this presentation starts at [6:48:00].

Finally, there was a presentation from Kohei Kitade of NTT Communications about “internet traffic expansion and submarine cables” where he shared the status of various submarine cable systems in the region.

It was a wonderful event, full of informative sessions and time to meet with industry leaders. We hope to see a larger crowd at BKNIX Peering Forum 2018.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

Reality AI raises $1.7M to power IoT device products with artificial intelligence

Reality AI, a New York-based SaaS application for R&D engineers developing IoT products closed a $1.7M seed investment round on May 15, 2017. The round was led by TechNexus Venture Collaborative, angel investors, and family offices.

The startup will use the proceeds for sales, marketing, and business development. Customers can “use it to create signal classifiers and detectors that can be used with your own devices and distributed as part of your own products”, reads the company’s software specification document.

At its core, Reality AI is an AI-based (Artificial Intelligence) signal processing company for device products instrumented with sensors i.e. sound, voltage/current, vibration, and proprietary sensors. The software is used to create classifiers and detectors that identify events in the real-time sensor input.

The key use cases of Reality AI are predictive maintenance and condition monitoring in industrial equipment. Customers can also put up the sensors on their mixers, pumps, or a robotic assembly unit to track equipment health.

Another application area of Reality AI is customers looking to generate precision data on their map data collected by drones. In short, the software can be used to garner intelligence from signals captured by off the shelf sensors.

“Our technology solves extremely difficult detection and classification problems in messy, high-variation, real- world signal data – but does it in a package that is usable by a working engineer who is not an expert in signal processing or machine learning. Plus, our customers can deploy on hardware they are already using”, said Stuart Feffer, chief executive officer and of the co-founder of Reality AI.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/iot

Reality AI raises $1.7M to power IoT device products with artificial intelligence

By News Aggregator

Reality AI, a New York-based SaaS application for R&D engineers developing IoT products closed a $1.7M seed investment round on May 15, 2017. The round was led by TechNexus Venture Collaborative, angel investors, and family offices.

The startup will use the proceeds for sales, marketing, and business development. Customers can “use it to create signal classifiers and detectors that can be used with your own devices and distributed as part of your own products”, reads the company’s software specification document.

At its core, Reality AI is an AI-based (Artificial Intelligence) signal processing company for device products instrumented with sensors i.e. sound, voltage/current, vibration, and proprietary sensors. The software is used to create classifiers and detectors that identify events in the real-time sensor input.

The key use cases of Reality AI are predictive maintenance and condition monitoring in industrial equipment. Customers can also put up the sensors on their mixers, pumps, or a robotic assembly unit to track equipment health.

Another application area of Reality AI is customers looking to generate precision data on their map data collected by drones. In short, the software can be used to garner intelligence from signals captured by off the shelf sensors.

“Our technology solves extremely difficult detection and classification problems in messy, high-variation, real- world signal data – but does it in a package that is usable by a working engineer who is not an expert in signal processing or machine learning. Plus, our customers can deploy on hardware they are already using”, said Stuart Feffer, chief executive officer and of the co-founder of Reality AI.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/iot

The post Reality AI raises $1.7M to power IoT device products with artificial intelligence appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE

By Kevin Meynell

The 13th Caribbean Network Operators’ Group (CaribNOG 13) was held on 18-19 April 2017 in Barbados. Around 30 participants from around the Caribbean came together to discuss operational issues and share expertise about evolving the Internet in the region, which was sponsored by the Internet Society along with others.

Kevin Meynell from the Deploy360 team attended the event and presented on Let’s Encrypt which is a free, automated and open Certificate Authority (CA) that’s encouraging the deployment of TLS and encrypted Internet communications. The aim is to have 100% of Internet encrypted, and CAs are currently need to validate domains and link them with the public keys used to establish encrypted connections.

The other benefit of Let’s Encrypt is that it uses the Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) to provide an API for requesting, validating, revoking and otherwise managing certificates. This is also currently being standardised through the IETF.

The inherent weakness of using any CA though, is they’re third parties that are able to issue certificates for any name or organisation. DANE is a protocol that instead allows certificates to be cryptographically bound to DNS names, and as we’ve discussed before, can be used in conjunction with Let’s Encrypt certificates to facilitate encrypted communications between hosts validated with DNSSEC.

There were a couple of other presentations with Deploy360 relevance. Kevon Swift (LACNIC) provided an overview on IPv6 Deployment and Impact in the LAC region. IPv6 deployment in the LAC region still remained fairly low, although Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago were in the Top 20 countries for IPv6 deployment with rates between 15 and 20%.

LACNIC had therefore commissioned a report in conjunction with the Development Bank of Latin America to examine IPv6 deployment in the region. This had led to several recommendations that included adjustments to regulatory frameworks and policies to facilitate IPv6 deployment, more support for research and education networks who were agents for innovation, and develop road maps to encourage timely transition to IPv6.

The other presentation was from Mark Kosters (ARIN) about Cloud Computing and DNSSEC Considerations. This discussed the issues of using DNSSEC with shared systems and how to ensure you have the right connections for sensitive information. How also does a cloud provider ensure isolation between clients?

Last but not least, we should also mention that our colleague Shernon Osepa from ISOC’s Latin America and Caribbean Bureau was at the meeting too, and provided an update on our activities in the Caribbean.

All the presentations from the meeting can be found on the CaribNOG website.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE

By News Aggregator

By Kevin Meynell

The 13th Caribbean Network Operators’ Group (CaribNOG 13) was held on 18-19 April 2017 in Barbados. Around 30 participants from around the Caribbean came together to discuss operational issues and share expertise about evolving the Internet in the region, which was sponsored by the Internet Society along with others.

Kevin Meynell from the Deploy360 team attended the event and presented on Let’s Encrypt which is a free, automated and open Certificate Authority (CA) that’s encouraging the deployment of TLS and encrypted Internet communications. The aim is to have 100% of Internet encrypted, and CAs are currently need to validate domains and link them with the public keys used to establish encrypted connections.

The other benefit of Let’s Encrypt is that it uses the Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) to provide an API for requesting, validating, revoking and otherwise managing certificates. This is also currently being standardised through the IETF.

The inherent weakness of using any CA though, is they’re third parties that are able to issue certificates for any name or organisation. DANE is a protocol that instead allows certificates to be cryptographically bound to DNS names, and as we’ve discussed before, can be used in conjunction with Let’s Encrypt certificates to facilitate encrypted communications between hosts validated with DNSSEC.

There were a couple of other presentations with Deploy360 relevance. Kevon Swift (LACNIC) provided an overview on IPv6 Deployment and Impact in the LAC region. IPv6 deployment in the LAC region still remained fairly low, although Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago were in the Top 20 countries for IPv6 deployment with rates between 15 and 20%.

LACNIC had therefore commissioned a report in conjunction with the Development Bank of Latin America to examine IPv6 deployment in the region. This had led to several recommendations that included adjustments to regulatory frameworks and policies to facilitate IPv6 deployment, more support for research and education networks who were agents for innovation, and develop road maps to encourage timely transition to IPv6.

The other presentation was from Mark Kosters (ARIN) about Cloud Computing and DNSSEC Considerations. This discussed the issues of using DNSSEC with shared systems and how to ensure you have the right connections for sensitive information. How also does a cloud provider ensure isolation between clients?

Last but not least, we should also mention that our colleague Shernon Osepa from ISOC’s Latin America and Caribbean Bureau was at the meeting too, and provided an update on our activities in the Caribbean.

All the presentations from the meeting can be found on the CaribNOG website.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post CaribNOG 13: Let’s Encrypt & DANE appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator