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How police unmasked suspect accused of sending seizure-inducing tweet

By David Kravets

(credit: zodman)

The man accused of sending a Newsweek writer a seizure-inducing tweet left behind a digital trail that the Dallas Police Department traced—beginning with the @jew_goldstein Twitter handle, leading to a burner mobile phone SIM card, and ending with an Apple iCloud account, according to federal court documents unsealed in the case.

Rivello with driver’s license. (credit: Court documents)

John Rayne Rivello was arrested Friday at his Maryland residence and is believed to be the nation’s first defendant accused of federal cyberstalking charges for allegedly victimizing an epileptic with a strobing, epileptogenic online image—in this instance a GIF sent via Twitter.

According to court documents, when Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald of Dallas, Texas opened his Twitter feed on December 15, he was met with a strobing message that read, “you deserve a seizure for your post.” Eichenwald, who has written that he has epilepsy, went into an eight-minute seizure where he lost control of his body functions and mental faculty. His wife found him, placed him on the floor, called 911, and took a picture of the offending tweet, according to court records.

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Read more here:: feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index?format=xml

How police unmasked suspect accused of sending seizure-inducing tweet

By News Aggregator

By David Kravets

(credit: zodman)

The man accused of sending a Newsweek writer a seizure-inducing tweet left behind a digital trail that the Dallas Police Department traced—beginning with the @jew_goldstein Twitter handle, leading to a burner mobile phone SIM card, and ending with an Apple iCloud account, according to federal court documents unsealed in the case.

Rivello with driver’s license. (credit: Court documents)

John Rayne Rivello was arrested Friday at his Maryland residence and is believed to be the nation’s first defendant accused of federal cyberstalking charges for allegedly victimizing an epileptic with a strobing, epileptogenic online image—in this instance a GIF sent via Twitter.

According to court documents, when Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald of Dallas, Texas opened his Twitter feed on December 15, he was met with a strobing message that read, “you deserve a seizure for your post.” Eichenwald, who has written that he has epilepsy, went into an eight-minute seizure where he lost control of his body functions and mental faculty. His wife found him, placed him on the floor, called 911, and took a picture of the offending tweet, according to court records.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read more here:: feeds.arstechnica.com/arstechnica/index?format=xml

The post How police unmasked suspect accused of sending seizure-inducing tweet appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

IoT is making strides, but it’s still in short trousers

By Jeremy Cowan

REVIEW: Events like last week’s Smart IoT London (March 15-16, ExCeL, Docklands) can be a salutary reminder of how far the Internet of Things (IoT) has come in a few short years. But they also show how much work remains to be done, says IoT Now‘s editorial director, Jeremy Cowan. We’ve been reporting on the […]

The post IoT is making strides, but it’s still in short trousers appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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IoT is making strides, but it’s still in short trousers

By News Aggregator

By Jeremy Cowan

REVIEW: Events like last week’s Smart IoT London (March 15-16, ExCeL, Docklands) can be a salutary reminder of how far the Internet of Things (IoT) has come in a few short years. But they also show how much work remains to be done, says IoT Now‘s editorial director, Jeremy Cowan. We’ve been reporting on the […]

The post IoT is making strides, but it’s still in short trousers appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Read more here:: www.m2mnow.biz/feed/

The post IoT is making strides, but it’s still in short trousers appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Term Sheet — Wednesday, March 15

By Erin Griffith

THE VC BEHIND THE COSMETICS COUNTER

Good morning, Term Sheet readers. Today’s column is from Fortune editor Matt Heimer. Enjoy.

In my life to date, I’ve watched umpteen thousand hours of prime-time television and leafed my way through a metric ton of magazines. So I’ve always been at least dimly aware of L’Or?al–the world’s biggest cosmetics company, and one of its top three spenders on advertising. Not that I’m a customer: On the fashion and skin care front, I’m one of those guys for whom the pejorative “basic” was coined. But L’Or?al is part of my mental and cultural wallpaper, along with similarly huge consumer brands that I encounter every day but don’t patronize, like Nike or McDonald’s.

Until very recently, if you had asked me how L’Or?al got so big, I would have said something appropriately dense and male like, “I dunno, I guess they invented a bunch of different makeup and sold it?” If you feel the same way, your eyes will be opened as mine were when you read my colleague Erin Griffith’s interview with Jean-Paul Agon, L’Or?al’s CEO since 2006, from this month’s issue of Fortune magazine. (Erin, whom you know as your regular Term Sheet columnist, interviewed Agon just before she left for vacation.)

It turns out that L’Or?al didn’t grow its beauty empire organically–or at least, it hasn’t done so since the Mad Men era. As Agon told Erin, the company has been expanding mostly via M&A: “Our model is, and has been for 50 years, to buy a brand at an early stage that we think can become a global successful player.” If spotting incipient success stories before they take off sounds a lot like the work of a venture capitalist…well, you’re on to something.

Of course, that analogy goes only so far. Being bought by L’Or?al is less like getting seed money from a VC and more like being acquired by the General Motors of makeup. This is a 108-year-old company that operates in 140 countries, runs an enormous research arm and owns an extra-large filing cabinet full of patents. If it had to grow only organically, it would probably do just fine.

But Agon describes L’Or?al’s management culture as one that may have more in common with startups than with other Global 500 corporations. That culture involves flexibility and openness to new ideas and new technologies, a combination that Agon dubs “organized chaos.” And in a beauty market where tastes change rapidly, it makes more sense for L’Or?al to acquire promising trend-setters than to play catch-up to those trends with internal R&D.

L’Or?al’s own name brand is relatively traditional and even conservative by beauty industry standards; this is a company, after all, that used to be called Soci?t? Fran?aise de Teintures Inoffensives pour Cheveux (“Safe Hair Dye Company of France”). So its in-house marketing geniuses may not have been likely to come up on their own with, say, a brand concept called Urban Decay. But a roving eye for good ideas outside its own walls helped the company spot that very hot brand and target it as a worthy acquisition, in 2012. (L’Or?al’s robust free cash flow, well north of $3.5 billion in each of the past four years, makes pulling the trigger on such acquisitions much easier.)

Perhaps most encouraging of all for the leaders of beauty startups, L’Or?al presents itself as a company that won’t mess with your brainchild after adopting it. “We offer [acquisition targets] the total respect of the identity, culture, spirit and soul of the brand,” Agon told Fortune. Music to a founder’s ears.

What’s Agon’s textbook example of success on the brand-integrity front? Kiehl’s, the New York boutique skin care brand, which L’Or?al has owned since 2000. It turns out there’s a bottle of their lotion in my travel bag. (Trust me, the scent is masculine.) So I guess I’m a L’Or?al customer after all. Who’s basic now? – Matt Heimer

File this in the “whoops” folder: Yesterday’s Term Sheet incorrectly stated that the VC firm Rokk3r Fuel has closed its inaugural fund. It is seeking to raise $150 million; it has not yet raised that amount. Additionally, in the item on Spectrum Equity and Cressey & Co.’s growth investment in Verisys, the hyperlink was incorrect. (Here’s the correct one). Apologies!

THE LATEST FROM FORTUNE…

[ts_bullet_primary] For advertisers, Instagram > Snapchat.

[ts_bullet_primary] Ex-Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad just launched a new HR startup.

[ts_bullet_primary] Donald Trump’s tax return showed he paid more than people thought. But it also suggests he understated his salary by millions.

[ts_bullet_primary] Big Food reconsiders its relationship with sugar, fat, and salt.

[ts_bullet_primary] The health startup trying to take on the multibillion-dollar diet industry.

[ts_bullet_primary] Commentary: Airbnb is way more competitive than Uber.

[ts_bullet_primary] Clifton Leaf has been named editor-in-chief of Fortune.

…AND ELSEWHERE

Domino’s high-tech $9 billion pizza empire. The toxic trouble brewing at Thinx. Lucky Peach‘s days are numbered. What if the future of fashion is spider silk. New questions arise on the safety of a Monsanto weed killer.

VENTURE DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] ServiceTitan, a Glendale, Calif. provider of business management software for plumbing and electrical service companies, raised $80 million in a Series B funding. ICONIQ Capital led the round.

[ts_bullet_primary] Visier, a San Jose, Calif.-based provider of workforce intelligence software, raised $45 million in Series D funding. Sorenson Capital led the round, and was joined by Foundation Capital, Summit Partners, and Adams Street Partners.

[ts_bullet_primary] Innovium, a San Jose, Calif. provider of networking silicon solutions for data centers, raised $38.3 million in Series C funding. Redline Capital led the round, and was joined by Greylock Partners, Walden Riverwood Ventures, Capricorn Investment Group, Qualcomm Ventures, and S-Cubed Capital.

[ts_bullet_primary] Evrythng, a New York-based IoT platform, raised $24.8 million in Series B funding. Sway Ventures led the round, and was joined by Generation Ventures and BLOC Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] .

[ts_bullet_primary] Evolv Technology, a Waltham, Mass. security platform, raised $18 million in Series B funding. Investors include Lux Capital, Bill Gates, General Catalyst, and DCVC.

[ts_bullet_primary] Infoworks, a San Jose, Calif. platform for end-to-end data warehousing, raised $15 million in Series B funding. Centerview Capital Technology led the round, and was joined by Nexus Venture Partners.

[ts_bullet_primary] Flow, a Hoboken, N.J. provider of a platform for cross-border commerce, raised $13 million in Series A funding from Bain Capital Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] Dyadic Security, an Israeli security software provider, raised $12 million in Series B funding. Goldman Sachs Principal Strategic Investments, Citi Ventures, and Innovation Endeavors led the round.

[ts_bullet_primary] LimeBike, a San Francisco bike-sharing network, raised $12 million in Series A funding. Andreessen Horowitz led the round, and was joined by Stanford University, IDG, and DCM.

[ts_bullet_primary] Bringg, an Israeli logistics platform for enterprises, raised $10 million in funding. Aleph VC led the round, and was joined by Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) and Pereg Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] Goodlord, a London software provider for real estate agents and renters, raised ?7.2 million ($8.9 million) from Ribbit Capital, LocalGlobe, and Global Founders Capital.

[ts_bullet_primary] Liven, an Australian hospitality-tech startup, raised A$10 million ($7.6 million) in funding from an unnamed Melbourne-based venture capital firm.

HEALTH + LIFE SCIENCES DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] CellAegis Devices, a Toronto medical device company, raised $ 9.5 million in Series C funding.

[ts_bullet_primary] NeuroOne, a Minnetonka, Minn. developer of neuromonitoring and neuromodulating products, raised $1.2 in seed funding from investors including FundRx.

PRIVATE EQUITY DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] Bain Capital is close to acquiring .

[ts_bullet_primary] .

[ts_bullet_primary] Atlantic Street Capital acquired a stake in Planet Fit Indy 10, which operates Planet Fitness (NYSE:PLNT) health clubs in the greater Indianapolis area.

[ts_bullet_primary] Excelligence Learning Corporation, which is backed by Brentwood Associates, acquired ChildCare Education Institute, a Duluth, Ga. provider of online training and certificates for the early child care and education market. Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

[ts_bullet_primary] Cedar Springs Capital and Crestline Investors acquired a majority stake in CarePayment, a Nashville, Tenn.-based company that helps patients manage their health-care expenses.

[ts_bullet_primary] Shore Capital Partners formed and invested in EyeSouth Partners, a provider of support services to affiliated eye care practices.

OTHER DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] Euronet Worldwide (Nasdaq:EEFT) offered $1 billion to acquire rival .

[ts_bullet_primary] Citrix Systems (Nasdaq:CTXS), which has a market cap of $13.2 billion, is considering strategic alternatives, such as putting itself up for sale. Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] Volkswagen (XTRA:VOW3), still struggling from the fall out of its emission scandal, indicated it could be open to a merger with Fiat Chrysler (BIT:FCA). Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] Neiman Marcus, a Dallas-based luxury fashion retailer, is putting itself up for sale. Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] American Securities agreed to acquire Air Methods Corporation (Nasdaq:AIRM) for an enterprise value of about $2.5 billion. At a price of $43 per Air Methods share, American Securities’ offer represents a 20.4% premium on the company’s stock price on January 31, 2017 prior to news regarding a sale.

[ts_bullet_primary] TechStyle Fashion Group, which owns the Kate Hudson-fronted .

[ts_bullet_primary] Harmony Merger (Nasdaq:HRMN), an acquisition company, agreed to merge with .

IPOS

[ts_bullet_primary] .

EXITS

[ts_bullet_primary] Active Interest Media, an El Segundo, Calif. Medica company backed by Wind Point Partners, sold Yachting Promotions, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla. operator of yachting and boat shows in the U.S., to Informa (LSE: INF.L).

FIRMS + FUNDS

[ts_bullet_primary] Bill Maris, the founder and ex-CEO of Google Ventures, is starting a venture fund after all, Bloomberg reports. After walking away from a $230 million health-focused fund late last year, Maris has decided to launch a new $100 million fund that will also focus on biotech and health-related companies. .

PEOPLE

[ts_bullet_primary] Mike Mogul joined Healthpoint Capital as a member of the firm’s leadership team. Mogul is the former CEO of DJO Global.

[ts_bullet_primary] Peter Coroneos joined Z Capital Group as a managing director and the global head of corporate development.

[ts_bullet_primary] B Capital Group announced a series of new hires: Kabir Narang joined the firm as an investment partner, Virginia Schmitt as chief financial officer and chief administrative officer, Chip Welsh and Dave Gallon as vice presidents, and Hailey Hu as a senior associate. In addition, the firm promoted Adam Seabrook from senior associate to principal.

SHARE TODAY’S TERM SHEET

Term Sheet is produced by Laura Entis. Submit deal items here. View this email in your browser.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

Term Sheet — Wednesday, March 15

By News Aggregator

By Erin Griffith

THE VC BEHIND THE COSMETICS COUNTER

Good morning, Term Sheet readers. Today’s column is from Fortune editor Matt Heimer. Enjoy.

In my life to date, I’ve watched umpteen thousand hours of prime-time television and leafed my way through a metric ton of magazines. So I’ve always been at least dimly aware of L’Or?al–the world’s biggest cosmetics company, and one of its top three spenders on advertising. Not that I’m a customer: On the fashion and skin care front, I’m one of those guys for whom the pejorative “basic” was coined. But L’Or?al is part of my mental and cultural wallpaper, along with similarly huge consumer brands that I encounter every day but don’t patronize, like Nike or McDonald’s.

Until very recently, if you had asked me how L’Or?al got so big, I would have said something appropriately dense and male like, “I dunno, I guess they invented a bunch of different makeup and sold it?” If you feel the same way, your eyes will be opened as mine were when you read my colleague Erin Griffith’s interview with Jean-Paul Agon, L’Or?al’s CEO since 2006, from this month’s issue of Fortune magazine. (Erin, whom you know as your regular Term Sheet columnist, interviewed Agon just before she left for vacation.)

It turns out that L’Or?al didn’t grow its beauty empire organically–or at least, it hasn’t done so since the Mad Men era. As Agon told Erin, the company has been expanding mostly via M&A: “Our model is, and has been for 50 years, to buy a brand at an early stage that we think can become a global successful player.” If spotting incipient success stories before they take off sounds a lot like the work of a venture capitalist…well, you’re on to something.

Of course, that analogy goes only so far. Being bought by L’Or?al is less like getting seed money from a VC and more like being acquired by the General Motors of makeup. This is a 108-year-old company that operates in 140 countries, runs an enormous research arm and owns an extra-large filing cabinet full of patents. If it had to grow only organically, it would probably do just fine.

But Agon describes L’Or?al’s management culture as one that may have more in common with startups than with other Global 500 corporations. That culture involves flexibility and openness to new ideas and new technologies, a combination that Agon dubs “organized chaos.” And in a beauty market where tastes change rapidly, it makes more sense for L’Or?al to acquire promising trend-setters than to play catch-up to those trends with internal R&D.

L’Or?al’s own name brand is relatively traditional and even conservative by beauty industry standards; this is a company, after all, that used to be called Soci?t? Fran?aise de Teintures Inoffensives pour Cheveux (“Safe Hair Dye Company of France”). So its in-house marketing geniuses may not have been likely to come up on their own with, say, a brand concept called Urban Decay. But a roving eye for good ideas outside its own walls helped the company spot that very hot brand and target it as a worthy acquisition, in 2012. (L’Or?al’s robust free cash flow, well north of $3.5 billion in each of the past four years, makes pulling the trigger on such acquisitions much easier.)

Perhaps most encouraging of all for the leaders of beauty startups, L’Or?al presents itself as a company that won’t mess with your brainchild after adopting it. “We offer [acquisition targets] the total respect of the identity, culture, spirit and soul of the brand,” Agon told Fortune. Music to a founder’s ears.

What’s Agon’s textbook example of success on the brand-integrity front? Kiehl’s, the New York boutique skin care brand, which L’Or?al has owned since 2000. It turns out there’s a bottle of their lotion in my travel bag. (Trust me, the scent is masculine.) So I guess I’m a L’Or?al customer after all. Who’s basic now? – Matt Heimer

File this in the “whoops” folder: Yesterday’s Term Sheet incorrectly stated that the VC firm Rokk3r Fuel has closed its inaugural fund. It is seeking to raise $150 million; it has not yet raised that amount. Additionally, in the item on Spectrum Equity and Cressey & Co.’s growth investment in Verisys, the hyperlink was incorrect. (Here’s the correct one). Apologies!

THE LATEST FROM FORTUNE…

[ts_bullet_primary] For advertisers, Instagram > Snapchat.

[ts_bullet_primary] Ex-Zenefits CEO Parker Conrad just launched a new HR startup.

[ts_bullet_primary] Donald Trump’s tax return showed he paid more than people thought. But it also suggests he understated his salary by millions.

[ts_bullet_primary] Big Food reconsiders its relationship with sugar, fat, and salt.

[ts_bullet_primary] The health startup trying to take on the multibillion-dollar diet industry.

[ts_bullet_primary] Commentary: Airbnb is way more competitive than Uber.

[ts_bullet_primary] Clifton Leaf has been named editor-in-chief of Fortune.

…AND ELSEWHERE

Domino’s high-tech $9 billion pizza empire. The toxic trouble brewing at Thinx. Lucky Peach‘s days are numbered. What if the future of fashion is spider silk. New questions arise on the safety of a Monsanto weed killer.

VENTURE DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] ServiceTitan, a Glendale, Calif. provider of business management software for plumbing and electrical service companies, raised $80 million in a Series B funding. ICONIQ Capital led the round.

[ts_bullet_primary] Visier, a San Jose, Calif.-based provider of workforce intelligence software, raised $45 million in Series D funding. Sorenson Capital led the round, and was joined by Foundation Capital, Summit Partners, and Adams Street Partners.

[ts_bullet_primary] Innovium, a San Jose, Calif. provider of networking silicon solutions for data centers, raised $38.3 million in Series C funding. Redline Capital led the round, and was joined by Greylock Partners, Walden Riverwood Ventures, Capricorn Investment Group, Qualcomm Ventures, and S-Cubed Capital.

[ts_bullet_primary] Evrythng, a New York-based IoT platform, raised $24.8 million in Series B funding. Sway Ventures led the round, and was joined by Generation Ventures and BLOC Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] .

[ts_bullet_primary] Evolv Technology, a Waltham, Mass. security platform, raised $18 million in Series B funding. Investors include Lux Capital, Bill Gates, General Catalyst, and DCVC.

[ts_bullet_primary] Infoworks, a San Jose, Calif. platform for end-to-end data warehousing, raised $15 million in Series B funding. Centerview Capital Technology led the round, and was joined by Nexus Venture Partners.

[ts_bullet_primary] Flow, a Hoboken, N.J. provider of a platform for cross-border commerce, raised $13 million in Series A funding from Bain Capital Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] Dyadic Security, an Israeli security software provider, raised $12 million in Series B funding. Goldman Sachs Principal Strategic Investments, Citi Ventures, and Innovation Endeavors led the round.

[ts_bullet_primary] LimeBike, a San Francisco bike-sharing network, raised $12 million in Series A funding. Andreessen Horowitz led the round, and was joined by Stanford University, IDG, and DCM.

[ts_bullet_primary] Bringg, an Israeli logistics platform for enterprises, raised $10 million in funding. Aleph VC led the round, and was joined by Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) and Pereg Ventures.

[ts_bullet_primary] Goodlord, a London software provider for real estate agents and renters, raised ?7.2 million ($8.9 million) from Ribbit Capital, LocalGlobe, and Global Founders Capital.

[ts_bullet_primary] Liven, an Australian hospitality-tech startup, raised A$10 million ($7.6 million) in funding from an unnamed Melbourne-based venture capital firm.

HEALTH + LIFE SCIENCES DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] CellAegis Devices, a Toronto medical device company, raised $ 9.5 million in Series C funding.

[ts_bullet_primary] NeuroOne, a Minnetonka, Minn. developer of neuromonitoring and neuromodulating products, raised $1.2 in seed funding from investors including FundRx.

PRIVATE EQUITY DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] Bain Capital is close to acquiring .

[ts_bullet_primary] .

[ts_bullet_primary] Atlantic Street Capital acquired a stake in Planet Fit Indy 10, which operates Planet Fitness (NYSE:PLNT) health clubs in the greater Indianapolis area.

[ts_bullet_primary] Excelligence Learning Corporation, which is backed by Brentwood Associates, acquired ChildCare Education Institute, a Duluth, Ga. provider of online training and certificates for the early child care and education market. Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

[ts_bullet_primary] Cedar Springs Capital and Crestline Investors acquired a majority stake in CarePayment, a Nashville, Tenn.-based company that helps patients manage their health-care expenses.

[ts_bullet_primary] Shore Capital Partners formed and invested in EyeSouth Partners, a provider of support services to affiliated eye care practices.

OTHER DEALS

[ts_bullet_primary] Euronet Worldwide (Nasdaq:EEFT) offered $1 billion to acquire rival .

[ts_bullet_primary] Citrix Systems (Nasdaq:CTXS), which has a market cap of $13.2 billion, is considering strategic alternatives, such as putting itself up for sale. Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] Volkswagen (XTRA:VOW3), still struggling from the fall out of its emission scandal, indicated it could be open to a merger with Fiat Chrysler (BIT:FCA). Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] Neiman Marcus, a Dallas-based luxury fashion retailer, is putting itself up for sale. Read more at Fortune.

[ts_bullet_primary] American Securities agreed to acquire Air Methods Corporation (Nasdaq:AIRM) for an enterprise value of about $2.5 billion. At a price of $43 per Air Methods share, American Securities’ offer represents a 20.4% premium on the company’s stock price on January 31, 2017 prior to news regarding a sale.

[ts_bullet_primary] TechStyle Fashion Group, which owns the Kate Hudson-fronted .

[ts_bullet_primary] Harmony Merger (Nasdaq:HRMN), an acquisition company, agreed to merge with .

IPOS

[ts_bullet_primary] .

EXITS

[ts_bullet_primary] Active Interest Media, an El Segundo, Calif. Medica company backed by Wind Point Partners, sold Yachting Promotions, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla. operator of yachting and boat shows in the U.S., to Informa (LSE: INF.L).

FIRMS + FUNDS

[ts_bullet_primary] Bill Maris, the founder and ex-CEO of Google Ventures, is starting a venture fund after all, Bloomberg reports. After walking away from a $230 million health-focused fund late last year, Maris has decided to launch a new $100 million fund that will also focus on biotech and health-related companies. .

PEOPLE

[ts_bullet_primary] Mike Mogul joined Healthpoint Capital as a member of the firm’s leadership team. Mogul is the former CEO of DJO Global.

[ts_bullet_primary] Peter Coroneos joined Z Capital Group as a managing director and the global head of corporate development.

[ts_bullet_primary] B Capital Group announced a series of new hires: Kabir Narang joined the firm as an investment partner, Virginia Schmitt as chief financial officer and chief administrative officer, Chip Welsh and Dave Gallon as vice presidents, and Hailey Hu as a senior associate. In addition, the firm promoted Adam Seabrook from senior associate to principal.

SHARE TODAY’S TERM SHEET

Term Sheet is produced by Laura Entis. Submit deal items here. View this email in your browser.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

The post Term Sheet — Wednesday, March 15 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Jio joins ranks of World #IPv6 Launch

By Mat Ford

IPv6 deployment watchers have been aware of strong growth in India (15.5% according to Akamai, 17.77% according to Google) for some time. One of the main reasons for that growth has been deployment on the mobile network of Jio (Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd.) and we are delighted that they have registered to join the ranks of World IPv6 Launch network operators.

Jio is an LTE mobile network operator in India. Jio’s deployment has been growing over the past year or so, and they are currently ranked fourth by our methodology with an IPv6 deployment percentage of 77.23%.

You can view the full listing of IPv6 network operator measurements for this month.

If you’re a network operator deploying IPv6 and would like to join Jio and the other networks that make up the ranks of World IPv6 Launch participants, please register your network for measurement.

Read more here:: www.worldipv6launch.org/feed/

Jio joins ranks of World #IPv6 Launch

By News Aggregator

By Mat Ford

IPv6 deployment watchers have been aware of strong growth in India (15.5% according to Akamai, 17.77% according to Google) for some time. One of the main reasons for that growth has been deployment on the mobile network of Jio (Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd.) and we are delighted that they have registered to join the ranks of World IPv6 Launch network operators.

Jio is an LTE mobile network operator in India. Jio’s deployment has been growing over the past year or so, and they are currently ranked fourth by our methodology with an IPv6 deployment percentage of 77.23%.

You can view the full listing of IPv6 network operator measurements for this month.

If you’re a network operator deploying IPv6 and would like to join Jio and the other networks that make up the ranks of World IPv6 Launch participants, please register your network for measurement.

Read more here:: www.worldipv6launch.org/feed/

The post Jio joins ranks of World #IPv6 Launch appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Intel’s Road to Self-Driving Cars Is Paved In Acquisitions

By News Aggregator

By Kirsten Korosec

Intel’s plan to compete in the emerging space of autonomous vehicles has hardly been subtle.

Its latest move to acquire computer vision systems company Mobileye for $15.3 billion is perhaps the biggest signal to date of its intention.

But the world’s largest chipmaker has spent the past 18 months investing in and acquiring companies as well as reorganizing its own business, all in an effort to ensure it doesn’t miss out on the next money-making opportunity.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich says autonomous driving is estimated to be a $70 billion vehicle systems and data services (total addressable market) opportunity by 2030.

This timeline of acquisitions and other activity shows how Intel intends to capture a piece of that market.

To be clear, Intel has a history in automotive. The company and its Wind River unit provides software and hardware products that it calls “In-Vehicle Solutions” and is used in vehicle infotainment systems, including navigation and telematics systems, which are used to provide real-time diagnostics, manage fleets of vehicles, and wireless hot spots.

Its activity in the past 18 months illustrates the company’s plan to expand beyond its existing business.

August 2015: Intel acquires for $16.7 billion a company called Altera that makes a type of chip called a field programmable gate array, or FPGA. Remember FPGA and that it’s different than other chips because it can be reprogrammed after it’s made.

April 2016: Intel acquires Yogitech, an Italian semiconductor designer that specializes in adding safety functions to chips used in self-driving cars and other autonomous devices.

April 2016: Intel’s Wind River unit, which focuses on Internet of Things software, says it has acquired Arynga, which makes software allowing cars to receive over-the-air updates.

May 2016: Intel buys Itseez, a company that specializes in machine vision technology that lets computers see and understand their surroundings. The technology is necessary for an autonomous vehicle, which needs to be able to perceive the world around it.

July 2016: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye announce they will partner to produce self-driving cars for city streets by 2021 and develop the technology as an open platform that can be used other automakers or ride-sharing companies.

September 2016: Intel acquires Moviduis, an AI startup that makes computer vision processors used in drones and virtual reality devices.

November 2016: Krzanich announces that the company’s venture capital arm will invest $250 million over the next two years into autonomous vehicle technology.

November 2016: Intel reorganizes its business to create a new division dedicated to autonomous driving. The new division, called the Automated Driving Group, spun out of its Internet of Things business.

January 2017: Intel launches a Intel GO, a new brand for its software and hardware tools for the development of driverless vehicles.

The brand includes a series of hardware and software development kits to help developers and engineers test and improve autonomous driving applications. The platform takes sensor data from cameras or radars on the vehicle and combines them with high-definition maps and artificial intelligence to determine the path the car is going to take.

Remember the FPGA, and the company Altera that makes them? This new GO platform pairs the FPGA technology with Intel processors.

Intel also launches under the new brand a 5G platform and a modem to help automakers develop and test a wide range of applications ahead of the expected rollout of 5G wireless systems in 2020.

January 2017: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye say they will put a fleet of about 40 autonomous BMW cars on the road by the end of the year.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

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Intel’s Road to Self-Driving Cars Is Paved In Acquisitions

By Kirsten Korosec

Intel’s plan to compete in the emerging space of autonomous vehicles has hardly been subtle.

Its latest move to acquire computer vision systems company Mobileye for $15.3 billion is perhaps the biggest signal to date of its intention.

But the world’s largest chipmaker has spent the past 18 months investing in and acquiring companies as well as reorganizing its own business, all in an effort to ensure it doesn’t miss out on the next money-making opportunity.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich says autonomous driving is estimated to be a $70 billion vehicle systems and data services (total addressable market) opportunity by 2030.

This timeline of acquisitions and other activity shows how Intel intends to capture a piece of that market.

To be clear, Intel has a history in automotive. The company and its Wind River unit provides software and hardware products that it calls “In-Vehicle Solutions” and is used in vehicle infotainment systems, including navigation and telematics systems, which are used to provide real-time diagnostics, manage fleets of vehicles, and wireless hot spots.

Its activity in the past 18 months illustrates the company’s plan to expand beyond its existing business.

August 2015: Intel acquires for $16.7 billion a company called Altera that makes a type of chip called a field programmable gate array, or FPGA. Remember FPGA and that it’s different than other chips because it can be reprogrammed after it’s made.

April 2016: Intel acquires Yogitech, an Italian semiconductor designer that specializes in adding safety functions to chips used in self-driving cars and other autonomous devices.

April 2016: Intel’s Wind River unit, which focuses on Internet of Things software, says it has acquired Arynga, which makes software allowing cars to receive over-the-air updates.

May 2016: Intel buys Itseez, a company that specializes in machine vision technology that lets computers see and understand their surroundings. The technology is necessary for an autonomous vehicle, which needs to be able to perceive the world around it.

July 2016: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye announce they will partner to produce self-driving cars for city streets by 2021 and develop the technology as an open platform that can be used other automakers or ride-sharing companies.

September 2016: Intel acquires Moviduis, an AI startup that makes computer vision processors used in drones and virtual reality devices.

November 2016: Krzanich announces that the company’s venture capital arm will invest $250 million over the next two years into autonomous vehicle technology.

November 2016: Intel reorganizes its business to create a new division dedicated to autonomous driving. The new division, called the Automated Driving Group, spun out of its Internet of Things business.

January 2017: Intel launches a Intel GO, a new brand for its software and hardware tools for the development of driverless vehicles.

The brand includes a series of hardware and software development kits to help developers and engineers test and improve autonomous driving applications. The platform takes sensor data from cameras or radars on the vehicle and combines them with high-definition maps and artificial intelligence to determine the path the car is going to take.

Remember the FPGA, and the company Altera that makes them? This new GO platform pairs the FPGA technology with Intel processors.

Intel also launches under the new brand a 5G platform and a modem to help automakers develop and test a wide range of applications ahead of the expected rollout of 5G wireless systems in 2020.

January 2017: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye say they will put a fleet of about 40 autonomous BMW cars on the road by the end of the year.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/