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Bluewave partners with Mimosa Networks to deliver ultrafast wireless broadband

By Zenobia Hegde

Mimosa Networks, the global technology provider in fiber-fast wireless broadband, announced that Bluewave has selected Mimosa as its fixed wireless technology partner. For its new island-wide high-speed broadband deployment, Bluewave is deploying Mimosa fixed wireless solutions to deliver ultra-broadband speeds in the British Territory.

Seeking to revolutionise the local market with a truly convergent network, Bluewave is providing affordable, reliable, high-speed internet, video and voice to its local business and residential subscribers. Bluewave is owned by East End Telecom, Bermuda’s public safety and wireless communication provider.

Bluewave designed the innovative 5G high-speed network using Mimosa’s signature GigaPoP and MicroPoP architectures. The GigaPoPs are network deployments centered around towers and commercial buildings using Mimosa A5c connectorised access pointsto service subscribers over long distances across the 21-mile island. Service offerings range from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps for residential customers and up to 1 Gbps to commercial clients.

In residential neighborhoods, Bluewave deployed Mimosa’s A5 access and C5 client devices in a higher-density MicroPoP architecture, servicing an average of 30 single family homes within a 500m radius from the access point. Bluewave also deployed Mimosa B5 and B11 backhaul radios to connect the network back to a fiber termination point.

In choosing Mimosa, Bluewave was looking for a technology partner that offered scale along with superior speeds and reliability. For residential deployments, aesthetics was also of utmost importance. “Setting up a MicroPoP with the Mimosa wireless solution does not involve the digging, trenching or overhead cables associated with wired access technologies, and the A5 access point and C5 client devices are compact and designed to fit discretely under the roofline of a house,” said Bluewave chief executive officer, Nick Faries.

Bluewave hopes that their efforts in Bermuda will serve as a model for other island countries struggling with similar connectivity challenges. “We are excited to partner with Mimosa,” said Faries. “Bluewave intends to change the internet game by providing fiber-like speeds over the air, and delivering resilient high-speed corporate internet.”

“We are excited to be partnering with the visionary management team at Bluewave,” said John Colvin, SVP of Global Field Operations at Mimosa. “By entering the high-speed broadband sector, Bluewave will bring system reliability and value for money that will benefit Bermudian residents and businesses alike.” Colvin continued, “Mimosa’s fiber-fast wireless portfolio will help Bluewave accelerate their time to market and time to service while providing the ultimate broadband experience to their subscribers.”

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Panasonic Launches New IoT Services with Silicon Valley Startups at CES 2018 Sands Expo

By IoT – Internet of Things

The Automotive & Industrial Systems Company of Panasonic Corporation is challenging to develop new businesses and services in the IoT field, in cooperation with Silicon Valley startups. Panasonic is advancing the development of new IoT services and solutions by combining leading UI/UX(*1) technology with its strong HMI (human machine interface) design technology, which has been […]

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Voice: The New Interface for Analytics

By Alex Woodie

We’ve grown accustomed to interacting with computers through a visual interface. But thanks to big gains in the accuracy of speech recognition, that’s changing, and among the applications being targeted for voice-enablement are business intelligence and analytics.

It wasn’t long ago that trying to interact with a computer through voice commands was an exercise in frustration. The computer could correctly pick out a few words here and there, but the number of mistakes made the whole process unfeasible. The reason was simple: The algorithms simply were not good enough to be able to accurately determine what a person is saying, at least without extensive training to learn the nuances of a single person’s voice.

But speech recognition has improved vastly over the past few years. Thanks to powerful neural network algorithms and a huge corpus of voice data to train on, the Web giants have made big strides in creating computers that one can talk to without feeling like you want to throw it out the window.

We’ve seen the biggest impact of this new AI-powered service at home. Anybody who has used Amazon Alexa, Apple Siri, Microsoft Cortana, or Google Home device can tell you that the systems are accurate enough to be worth using for a set of tasks, like playing a song, checking the weather, or ordering pizza. Consumers, being the fickle creatures they are, would simply move on to something else if the home assistants were too frustrating, inaccurate, or cumbersome to use.

That’s not to say that the devices are perfect. A year ago, Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced that Google has improved its speech recognition technology accuracy to about a 5% error rate, which means one out of every 20 words is missed. While there’s room for improvement, that’s a big step up from 2015, when the error rate was 8%, and a giant leap from 2013, when it was an unusable 23%. (For the record, Microsoft has announced similar improvements in its speech recognition tech.)

Amazon’s Echo leads the AI-powered home assistant race at the moment (Roman Tiraspolsky/Shutterstock)

As a result of this new capability, the Web giants have turned to voice as an input for many of their consumer products. “Our word error rate continues to improve even in very noisy environments,” Pichai said at the 2017 Google I/O event. “This is why if you speak to Google on your phone or Google Home, we can pick up your voice accurately.”

When you pair speech recognition’s newfound capabilities with another computing trend — the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the proliferation of network-connected smart devices – you quickly realize that we’re on the cusp of a whole new world of voice-driven control.

That jibes with Amazon’s vision, which is to give customers access to Alexa “whenever and wherever they want,” Steve Rabuchin, VP of Amazon Alexa, recently told Adweek. “That means customers may be able to talk to their cars, refrigerators, thermostats, lamps, and all kinds of devices in and outside their homes.”

Today, this trend manifests with the specter of voice search, which sees people speaking into an Amazon Echo or a smartphone app and expecting to hear a verbalized response (the text-to-speech part of the equation is a much easier problem to solve). In fact, voice search is getting so big that media analytics company comScore predicts that it will account for 50 percent of all searches by 2020. The popularity of voice-enabled trend shows up in the numbers. According to eMarketer, there are 45 million voice-assisted devices in the United States, a number that’s projected to increase to 67 million by next year.

But the AI-powered technology is projected to quickly move beyond voice search and into a whole new realm of personalized, voice-enabled services. Nobody knows what the Web giants are working on behind closed doors, but it’s likely going to demand a lot of attention when it’s ready.

That’s not stopping businesses from utilizing the tech that’s already available to help things run smoother in the office. Zach Holmquist, Chief of Workplace Experience for Teem, says the automated office is closer at hand than many realize.

Thanks to improvements in speech recognition, users can now interact with enterprise systems via voice (chombosan/Shutterstock)

“Virtual home assistants like Alexa and beacons have entered the workplace, resulting in more personalized interactions, voice- and sensor-activated meeting scheduling, and sensors automatically adjusting temperature, meeting check-ins or anticipating lunch requests,” he says.

The improved speech recognition is also showing up in new analytics and business intelligence solutions that allow workers to query databases using nothing but their voices. One company on the cutting edge of this trend is iOLAP, a San Francisco-based analytics company that’s working with Amazon and other Web giants to turn their speech recognition tech into the new user interface for enterprise systems.

“Think of it as voice-enabling your corporate dashboard,” says Chris Jordan, the CEO and managing director of iOLAP. “Think of it as an executive walk into his office and wants his daily briefing, and it’s a rundown of main KPIs that he’s interested in.”

While algorithms from Amazon and Microsoft handle the speech recognition bit, iOLAP is building all the other stuff that’s needed to make the whole system work, including turning text payloads into SQL and submitting them to a database, working with APIs, and handling the necessary user access and security controls required in the corporate environment.

iOLAP’s enterprise voice technology can work with analytics and transactional applications. In the analytics space, it’s more about setting up pre-built access paths to data. “It can be anything, as long as we know somewhat ahead of time,” Jordan says. “It’s definitely not data exploration. The queries are pre-defined with variables, and the variable can be data elements.”

For example, if the CEO of a retailer wants to be able to query sales results across 1,000 stores over time, those columns in the database will need to be set up ahead of time. “But I don’t have to know what all the possible dates or what the possible stores are,” Jordan says. “We’re querying the database to get those responses.”

Owing to the nature of a voice-enabled interaction, one must be careful not to tread too deeply into the data waters. There’s only a certain amount of data that can be transmitted verbally, so customers are wise to pick and choose their use cases carefully.

“You don’t want to sit and listen to Alexa read a Tableau report for you,” Jordan says. “You probably want to ask a more specific question that come up with a more finite answer.”

iOLAP’s voice analytics solution has seen action at several real-world customers, including at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, where the solution is used to give air traffic controllers a way to verbally query and track the overall flow of airplanes; at the Dickey’s Barbeque Pit chain, where it’s used to help employees more efficiently track the temperatures of meat; and at Pioneer Natural Resources, where it’s used to voice-enable an enterprise dashboard.

The timing is right for voice-enabled analytics apps to enter our lives, Jordan says. “People are getting more and more used to interacting with their system via voice, in their consumer life, and we believe that will be drawn into the enterprise as well,” he says.

Related Items:

Speak Easy: Why Voice Data Is Poised for Big Growth

AI to Surpass Human Perception in 5 to 10 Years, Zuckerberg Says

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Toshiba Introduces New Bluetooth 5-Compliant ICs with Industry-Leading Sensitivity Level of -105dBm

By IoT – Internet of Things

Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. has added two new devices to its lineup of ICs that are compliant with the Bluetooth® low energy standard[1]. The new TC35680FSG (featuring built-in flash memory) and TC35681FSG are well-suited to applications requiring long-range communication, including beacon tags, IoT devices and industrial equipment. Sample shipments will begin later this month. The […]

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Top ten mobile operators have 76% market share in cellular IoT, says Berg Insight

By Zenobia Hegde

A new report from the IoT analyst firm Berg Insight says that the ten leading global mobile operator groups have a combined market share of 76% in cellular IoT. The top players reported a combined active base of 407 million cellular IoT connections at the end of H1-2017.

China Mobile was number one with 150 million IoT connections in the period. Vodafone ranked second, with a reported 59 million connections, ahead of China Unicom with 50 million IoT connections. AT&T and China Telecom ranked fourth and fifth with 36 million and 28 million IoT connections respectively.

Deutsche Telecom, Softbank/Sprint, Verizon and Telefónica currently had in the range of 15–20 million cellular IoT subscribers, which are growing at yearly rates of 15–30%. Telenor was the last player in the top ten with approximately 12 million cellular IoT subscribers.

“The Chinese mobile operators achieved tremendous volume growth in 2017, driven by accelerating uptake of cellular IoT in the domestic market”, says Tobias Ryberg, senior analyst at Berg Insight and author of the report. “China Mobile is believed to have reached 200 million cellular IoT connections at the end of 2017”.

Vodafone and AT&T are consolidating their positions as regional market leaders in Europe and North America respectively, serving multinational clients on a global basis. “In 2017, Vodafone extended its lead in the European market”, says Mr Ryberg. “The competitors are however also gaining momentum and the expanding market has room for multiple players”.

In terms of revenues, the Western mobile operators are ahead of their Chinese counterparts. Berg Insight expects that at least three operator groups – AT&T, Verizon and Vodafone – will generate more than US$ 1 billion (€0.83 billion) in revenues from IoT in 2018. “The main strategy for growing IoT revenues is vertical plays in major application areas,” says Mr Ryberg.

“Verizon, Vodafone and others have made significant acquisitions in the connected vehicle space to extend their product portfolios. AT&T and Deutsche Telekom develop dedicated practices for smart cities and many operators seek to play leading roles in national projects in areas like smart metering and electronic road charging”.

Download report brochure here.

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