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Microsoft launches IoT Central to Simplify Internet of Things Management

By News Aggregator

By Richard Hay

This week Microsoft’s Sam George, the Partner Director for Microsoft Azure IoT announced on the companies Internet of Things (IoT) blog that the company is now offering a new Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) to help companies manage their IoT efforts.

According to George, IoT is now a big part of many companies infrastructure and growing quickly. That means they need a service to help them not only manage the IoT devices they are starting to use but also the means to analyze the vast amounts of data they generate.

Microsoft IoT Central is built upon the companies proven cloud service Microsoft Azure and compliments their existing Azure IoT Suite to enhance the control and customization options of the services.

Right now the service is not available to the general public but you can sign up to get pre-release information and to be notified when access opens up.

In addition, if you are an IoT company looking to possibly partner with Microsoft in this area you can also make contact with them to open up that dialog.

Finally, here is an overview video of the upcoming service:

Read more here:: datacenterknowledge.com/feed/

The post Microsoft launches IoT Central to Simplify Internet of Things Management appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Why 5G?

By Cablefax Guest Columnist

bastian

By Chris Bastian, Senior Vice President/CTO, SCTE/ISBE

For wireless network operators, the buzz for many years now, dating back to at least 2008, has been about the next-generation wireless specification, or 5G, and when it will be generally available.

Why the rush? What are the 5G capabilities that will be superior to the current 4G/LTE-Advanced standards?

The generally agreed-upon 5G design goals are:

  • Improved RF coverage
  • Greater individual peak data rates, over 1 Gbps, to support applications including fixed residential broadband (a potential competitor to cable modem-based service)
  • Lower latency than 4G—less than 10 ms, to support applications like virtual reality
  • Channel bandwidth up to 800 MHz, in the millimeter wave spectrum
  • Higher spectral efficiency than 4G
  • New architecture embracing network virtualization and “network slicing,” which will enable the core network to support different applications simultaneously
  • Support for new use cases such as the Internet of Things
  • More energy efficient

Current 4G/LTE-Advanced capabilities are:

  • A nominal data rate of 100 Mbps when the client is moving, and optimally up to 1 Gbps under fixed conditions
  • Scalable channel bandwidth up to 20 MHz, and optionally up to 40 MHz
  • Peak link spectral efficiency of 15 bits/s/Hz in the downlink and 6.75 bits/s/Hz in the uplink
  • Increased number of simultaneously active subscribers per cell

LTE-Advanced is not waiting for 5G and continues to evolve. However, there is a difference of opinion in the tech community as to how long LTE-Advanced can support ever-increasing subscriber and network demands.

Need for Standardization

As with any new network capability, the benefits of standardizing 5G are:

  • Speeding up market introduction and expediting adoptionand deployment
  • Ensuring interoperability between network equipment
  • Lowering the cost by eliminating redundancy and minimizing errors
  • Opening up market access and providing economies of scale
  • Simplifying how to understand and compare competing products
  • Enabling companies to comply with government policies and regulations
  • Ensuring safety, reliability, and environmental care

The development of 5G standards is primarily governed through IEEE and 3GPP.

Anticipated Timeline

Several pilots are already underway using proprietary solutions based on what 5G may become. Some examples are:

  • AT&T is conducting 5G trials in such a way to be able to pivot to compliant commercial deployments once 5G technology standards are set. International standards body 3GPP will likely complete the first phase of that standardization process in 2018. Meanwhile, AT&T continues to evolve its 4G network to deliver higher capacity and the best experience for its customers. (AT&T, February 2016)
  • Sprint will collaborate with Nokia and Ericsson to trial its 5G millimeter wave technology at the Centennial Copa America soccer event. (Sprint, May 2016)
  • Samsung to collaborate with T-Mobile on 5G mobile network technology demonstrations and trials. (Samsung, September 2016)
  • Verizon to deliver 5G service to pilot customers in 11 markets across the U.S. by mid-2017. (Verizon, February 2017)

Operational pilots will continue into 2018 and 2019. Most equipment vendors and analysts predict that standardized 5G equipment will become generally available in 2020 or later.

SCTE•ISBE Wireless Working Group

Last year, SCTE•ISBE launched its Wireless Working Group, as part of its Network Operations Subcommittee (NOS). The group’s charter is to evaluate and develop best practices and share expertise via the creation and publication of operational practices and standards related to the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of wireless access networks managed by cable operators.

These wireless networks currently include cellular, point-to-point, and Wi-Fi technology in commercial, residential, and outdoor environments. As the 5G specifications and field trials evolve, this working group will be developing the tools necessary for cable field operations to support 5G. For more information, please see http://www.scte.org/standards.

The post Why 5G? appeared first on Cablefax.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/cable360/ct/operations?format=xml

Why 5G?

By News Aggregator

bastian

By Cablefax Guest Columnist

By Chris Bastian, Senior Vice President/CTO, SCTE/ISBE

For wireless network operators, the buzz for many years now, dating back to at least 2008, has been about the next-generation wireless specification, or 5G, and when it will be generally available.

Why the rush? What are the 5G capabilities that will be superior to the current 4G/LTE-Advanced standards?

The generally agreed-upon 5G design goals are:

  • Improved RF coverage
  • Greater individual peak data rates, over 1 Gbps, to support applications including fixed residential broadband (a potential competitor to cable modem-based service)
  • Lower latency than 4G—less than 10 ms, to support applications like virtual reality
  • Channel bandwidth up to 800 MHz, in the millimeter wave spectrum
  • Higher spectral efficiency than 4G
  • New architecture embracing network virtualization and “network slicing,” which will enable the core network to support different applications simultaneously
  • Support for new use cases such as the Internet of Things
  • More energy efficient

Current 4G/LTE-Advanced capabilities are:

  • A nominal data rate of 100 Mbps when the client is moving, and optimally up to 1 Gbps under fixed conditions
  • Scalable channel bandwidth up to 20 MHz, and optionally up to 40 MHz
  • Peak link spectral efficiency of 15 bits/s/Hz in the downlink and 6.75 bits/s/Hz in the uplink
  • Increased number of simultaneously active subscribers per cell

LTE-Advanced is not waiting for 5G and continues to evolve. However, there is a difference of opinion in the tech community as to how long LTE-Advanced can support ever-increasing subscriber and network demands.

Need for Standardization

As with any new network capability, the benefits of standardizing 5G are:

  • Speeding up market introduction and expediting adoptionand deployment
  • Ensuring interoperability between network equipment
  • Lowering the cost by eliminating redundancy and minimizing errors
  • Opening up market access and providing economies of scale
  • Simplifying how to understand and compare competing products
  • Enabling companies to comply with government policies and regulations
  • Ensuring safety, reliability, and environmental care

The development of 5G standards is primarily governed through IEEE and 3GPP.

Anticipated Timeline

Several pilots are already underway using proprietary solutions based on what 5G may become. Some examples are:

  • AT&T is conducting 5G trials in such a way to be able to pivot to compliant commercial deployments once 5G technology standards are set. International standards body 3GPP will likely complete the first phase of that standardization process in 2018. Meanwhile, AT&T continues to evolve its 4G network to deliver higher capacity and the best experience for its customers. (AT&T, February 2016)
  • Sprint will collaborate with Nokia and Ericsson to trial its 5G millimeter wave technology at the Centennial Copa America soccer event. (Sprint, May 2016)
  • Samsung to collaborate with T-Mobile on 5G mobile network technology demonstrations and trials. (Samsung, September 2016)
  • Verizon to deliver 5G service to pilot customers in 11 markets across the U.S. by mid-2017. (Verizon, February 2017)

Operational pilots will continue into 2018 and 2019. Most equipment vendors and analysts predict that standardized 5G equipment will become generally available in 2020 or later.

SCTE•ISBE Wireless Working Group

Last year, SCTE•ISBE launched its Wireless Working Group, as part of its Network Operations Subcommittee (NOS). The group’s charter is to evaluate and develop best practices and share expertise via the creation and publication of operational practices and standards related to the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of wireless access networks managed by cable operators.

These wireless networks currently include cellular, point-to-point, and Wi-Fi technology in commercial, residential, and outdoor environments. As the 5G specifications and field trials evolve, this working group will be developing the tools necessary for cable field operations to support 5G. For more information, please see http://www.scte.org/standards.

The post Why 5G? appeared first on Cablefax.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/cable360/ct/operations?format=xml

The post Why 5G? appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Corsa Strives to Combat Growing Volumetric DDoS Attacks

By News Aggregator

By Frank J. Ohlhorst

DDoS attacks are on the rise, and with the rise of those attacks come some sobering realizations. One realization is that DDoS attacks are evolving and becoming more persistent. Another realization is that DDoS attacks are escalating in size, so much so that experts expect at least one Tbit/s attack a month in 2017. Attacks of that scale will make the record-setting 620 Gbps attack against the “Krebs on Security site” seem almost insignificant. An attack which used unprotected IoT devices to generate massive amounts of traffic, something unheard of at the time. However, with DDoS attacks, there is a common theme, one established in the reality that there is not much difference between a 300 Gbps, 500 Gbps and a 1 Tbps attack. Or, more simply put – big is big, and mitigating those attacks proves somewhat similar.

The basic strategy to mitigating volumetric DDoS attacks is not particularly complex. Administrators set up rules to flag the attack traffic, detect the attack, apply those rules to dump attack traffic, all the while keeping all other traffic flowing normally. Unfortunately, the lack of complexity does not always make things easy. Bruce Gregory, CEO of Corsa points out that there are several places mitigation can fall down. Gregory said, “You have to be able to store enough rules to cover the massive quantity of bots involved in the attack, plus create and store the rules quickly enough, and process all the rules in real time and at line-rate. If mitigation fails at any of these, the attack succeeds and the site comes down.”

Put simply, protecting against rising volumetric DDoS attacks requires the very best DDoS detection and a mitigation solution that can handle multi-hundred Gbps attacks. That’s a tall order, and one Gregory claims that the Corsa Red Armor mitigation appliance can fill. “The Corsa Red Armor NSE7000 was made precisely for this kind of volumetric DDoS attack,” said Gregory. “Service providers and network architects can leverage Red Armor for universal mitigation of any size volumetric DDoS attack. It provides the needed 100G line rate enforcement and only impacts traffic as a bump in the wire.”

Gregory recognizes that 100G DDoS mitigation at line-rate is a big claim. To that end, Corsa ran rigorous performance tests to verify the Red Armor platform was up to the task. The results showed the DDoS mitigation appliance can apply 200,000 rules in under a minute while saturated with a 100 Gbps mix of normal and attack traffic.

To accomplish this, Corsa’s hardware architecture separates front-end processing of traffic with distinct TCAM offloads and advanced search algorithms. The architecture allows the mitigation engine to work at 100 Gbps line-rate and process packets at 150Mpps while simultaneously updating rules tables at a rate of 3,389 rules per second. Gregory added, “This means that hundreds of thousands of attack types can be detected and the appropriate mitigation rules stored and acted upon in less than 60 seconds with no impact to legitimate traffic.”

Volumetric attacks are the new normal, and Gregory’s advice to network architects is to step up their defenses with more capable mitigation techniques that can bring a quick end to DDoS attacks.

Read more here:: gigaom.com/feed/

The post Corsa Strives to Combat Growing Volumetric DDoS Attacks appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Introducing the Arduino MKRFOX1200

By Arduino Team

On Arduino Day, we announced the latest member of the Arduino MKR family: the MKRFOX1200. This powerful IoT development board offers a practical and cost effective solution for Makers looking to add Sigfox connectivity to their projects with minimal previous networking experience.

The MKRFOX1200 shares several similarities with other MKR products, like the MKR1000 and MKRZero, including a compact form factor (67 x 25mm) and a Microchip SAM D21 32-bit Cortex-M0+ microcontroller at its core. The recently unveiled board also features an ATA8520 module for long-range, low-energy consumption, and is capable of running for over six months on two standard AA 1.5V batteries.

Designed for Makers ready to take their IoT projects into the real world, the MKRFOX1200 comes with a GSM antenna that can be attached to the board and a two-year subscription to the Sigfox network. This provides users with full access to Sigfox’s efficient messaging system (up to 140 messages per day), cloud platform, webhooks, APIs, as well as the new Spot’it geolocation service.

MKRFOX1200 can be used in a wide variety of settings, from agriculture (livestock management, smart irrigation and weather stations), to smart cities (dumpster monitoring, air quality networks, street lighting or parking lot tracking), to utility metering and other industrial applications.

“Sigfox loves Makers,” says Nicolas Lesconnec, Head of Developer Relations. “Sigfox aims to empowers billions of new IoT solutions. We’re proud to partner with Arduino, the leading open-source electronics platform, to offer the simplest way to connect anything.”

Sigfox currently operates in over 30 countries, with more to follow in the next few years. (Use this map to see whether it has been deployed or is rolling out in your area.) The first version of the MKRFOX1200 is compatible with Sigfox Radio Configuration Zone 1 (868MHz, 14dBm), meaning it is only supported in network-covered regions of Europe, the Middle East, and South Africa.

Interested? You can find the MKRFOX1200’s specs here, and watch Massimo Banzi’s overview below. The board is now available on Arduino’s European online store!

Read more here:: blog.arduino.cc/feed/

Introducing the Arduino MKRFOX1200

By News Aggregator

By Arduino Team

On Arduino Day, we announced the latest member of the Arduino MKR family: the MKRFOX1200. This powerful IoT development board offers a practical and cost effective solution for Makers looking to add Sigfox connectivity to their projects with minimal previous networking experience.

The MKRFOX1200 shares several similarities with other MKR products, like the MKR1000 and MKRZero, including a compact form factor (67 x 25mm) and a Microchip SAM D21 32-bit Cortex-M0+ microcontroller at its core. The recently unveiled board also features an ATA8520 module for long-range, low-energy consumption, and is capable of running for over six months on two standard AA 1.5V batteries.

Designed for Makers ready to take their IoT projects into the real world, the MKRFOX1200 comes with a GSM antenna that can be attached to the board and a two-year subscription to the Sigfox network. This provides users with full access to Sigfox’s efficient messaging system (up to 140 messages per day), cloud platform, webhooks, APIs, as well as the new Spot’it geolocation service.

MKRFOX1200 can be used in a wide variety of settings, from agriculture (livestock management, smart irrigation and weather stations), to smart cities (dumpster monitoring, air quality networks, street lighting or parking lot tracking), to utility metering and other industrial applications.

“Sigfox loves Makers,” says Nicolas Lesconnec, Head of Developer Relations. “Sigfox aims to empowers billions of new IoT solutions. We’re proud to partner with Arduino, the leading open-source electronics platform, to offer the simplest way to connect anything.”

Sigfox currently operates in over 30 countries, with more to follow in the next few years. (Use this map to see whether it has been deployed or is rolling out in your area.) The first version of the MKRFOX1200 is compatible with Sigfox Radio Configuration Zone 1 (868MHz, 14dBm), meaning it is only supported in network-covered regions of Europe, the Middle East, and South Africa.

Interested? You can find the MKRFOX1200’s specs here, and watch Massimo Banzi’s overview below. The board is now available on Arduino’s European online store!

Read more here:: blog.arduino.cc/feed/

The post Introducing the Arduino MKRFOX1200 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Deploy360 @ MENOG17

By News Aggregator

By Aftab Siddiqui

The Deploy360 team will be busy this week at the MENOG 17 (Middle East Network Operators Group) in Muscat, Oman on 19th and 20th April 2017. The agenda of the event has been announced and the program is packed with great presentations/talks relevant to the network operator’s community. MENOG PC has done a remarkable job once again. At present, the attendee list is showing 272 people who have registered for the events and which is likely to grow as we approach the event.

Day 1 (19th April) is dedicated to the Peering, Content and Interconnection. After the opening and keynote speech, Google, Hurricane Electric (HE), PCH and others will present.

The first session on Day 2 (20th April) will be chaired by Aftab Siddiqui on IPv6. In this session Jan Zorz will present “NAT64/DNS64 Real Life Experiments; Warnings and One Useful Tool”, where he’ll talk about the NAT64/DNS64 experiments undertaken by Go6lab and IPv6-lab. As many mobile operators are moving to IPv6 only, it’s necessary to employ transition mechanisms such as 464XLAT or NAT64. The Go6lab NAT64/DNS64 testbed has therefore been established so that operators, service providers, and hardware and software vendors can see how their solutions work in these environments. This is a really interesting presentation, so be sure to catch this session if you’re involved with IPv6 deployment.

Later during the day in lightning talks, Aftab Siddiqui will present an introduction to MANRS initiative, Mutually Agreed Norms for Routing Security (MANRS) is an initiative of network operators to establish a very well recognised industry supported baseline for implementation of essential security measures.

This is going to be a special event as MENOG will be celebrating a big landmark i.e. 10 years of successful community effort for the progress and cooperation in the region.

MENOG17 is providing an opportunity to come and meet the team and hear about what the Internet Society is doing, but we’re always happy to talk anytime about technology and how we can make the Internet a better place. If you are planning to attend the event then don’t forget to catch up with Deploy 360 team.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Deploy360 @ MENOG17 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Data Sheet—Monday, April 17, 2017

By Adam Lashinsky, Heather Clancy

Companies, like people and cities, have every right to call themselves whatever they please. I come to this conviction, perhaps, as a native of Illinois, where cities like Des Plaines (pronounced dess-PLAINS) and Marseilles (mar-SAILS) defy the sophisticated outsider to apply a French pronunciation.

Silver Spring Networks, a publicly traded company that provides so-called smart meters and other networked energy-efficiency services to electric utilities, prefers to be known, at least by its newish CEO, as an Internet of Things, or IoT, company. “IoT is real, not slideware” says Mike Bell, who joined Silver Spring in late 2015. Bell has an illustrious background: a varied career at Apple before and after Steve Jobs returned to the company, followed by senior stints at Palm and Intel.

He says he took the recruiter call from Silver Spring because he recognized the IoT potential. “We have 26 million devices in the field on every [habitable] continent,” he says, noting that the networks Silver Spring runs on behalf of its utility customers amount to something nearly as powerful as an alternate Internet.

Still, Silver Spring has challenges. It has expanded into non-utility services like managing a municipality’s streetlights to maximize efficiency and minimize downtime. It wants to be more than a smart meter company. Yet three utilities make up nearly 70% of its revenues. And according to its securities filings, Silver Spring faces a bevy of competitors, from giants Cisco, AT&T, and Alcatel-Lucent to smaller players like Sigfox, Ingenu, and a nonprofit cell phone company coalition called the LoRa Alliance, which is focused on IoT.

Silver Spring, which doesn’t make money, is a relative pipsqueak, with a market capitalization of about $600 million. Foundation Capital, one of its venture-capital backers, continues to hold a nearly 20% stake in the company.

Bell is right that IoT is real. His well-positioned company’s slowness in capitalizing on the trend illustrates where the skepticism comes from about it. Making money on an idea is harder than it looks.

Adam Lashinsky
@adamlashinsky
adam_lashinksky@fortune.com

BITS AND BYTES

Facebook shareholders: How much could ‘fake news’ hurt the company? A proxy proposal filed last week suggests that the social networking giant prepare a broad report about the issue. The group is interested learning more about both the overriding threat to democracy and free speech, as well as the risks to Facebook’s revenue model posed by the phenomenon. Facebook’s directors aren’t keen on the idea. (Reuters)

Apple is now officially allowed to test self-driving cars in California. It recently received a permit from state regulators, serving as confirmation that the tech giant, like its big rival Google, is working on autonomous vehicle technologies. But we still don’t know much about the initiative, which reportedly goes by the codename Project Titan–including whether Apple is working on just software or an actual car. (Fortune, New York Times, Fast Company)

Bitcoin proponents beware. A hacker group claims to have figured out a way to break into digital wallets by “brute force,” potentially allowing them to steal the digital currency. Realistically, though, the chances for significant financial gain are pretty slim. (Fortune)

Here’s how hotels are making it rough for upstart Airbnb. The industry is using its lobbying power to encourage regulatory scrutiny of the home-rental company at the local, state, and national level, reports The New York Times. It turns out the American Hotel and Lodging Association–backed by Marriott, Hilton, and Hyatt–was behind both New York’s stricter rules regarding home and apartment rentals, as well as the Federal Trade Commission’s investigation into its business model. (New York Times)

THE DOWNLOAD

Why some cloud deals are fake news. Just under two years ago, NetSuite announced a set of partnerships with Microsoft, including plans to move some of its computing workloads from Amazon Web Services to the Microsoft Azure public cloud.

This was interesting in that it seemed to demonstrate a large software company agreeing to use data center infrastructure from Microsoft, which is a distant second to AWS in public cloud–basically a huge set of computing, storage, and networking resources that one company owns, manages, and rents to multiple customers.

The thing is: This promised move never happened. Fortune‘s Barb Darrow reports on why it’s not all that unusual for a big multi-vendor partnership to die on the vine.

ONE MORE THING

Remembering a pioneer in personal computing. Robert Taylor’s work at the Advanced Research Project Agency led to the creation of Arpanet, the precursor to today’s Internet. Taylor, who was 85 when it passed away last week in Northern California, also worked at the Palo Alto Research Center. There, he helped fund the Alto, one of the ancestors to today’s personal computers. (New York Times)

This edition of Data Sheet was curated by Heather Clancy.
Find past issues. Sign up for other Fortune newsletters.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

Data Sheet—Monday, April 17, 2017

By News Aggregator

By Adam Lashinsky, Heather Clancy

Companies, like people and cities, have every right to call themselves whatever they please. I come to this conviction, perhaps, as a native of Illinois, where cities like Des Plaines (pronounced dess-PLAINS) and Marseilles (mar-SAILS) defy the sophisticated outsider to apply a French pronunciation.

Silver Spring Networks, a publicly traded company that provides so-called smart meters and other networked energy-efficiency services to electric utilities, prefers to be known, at least by its newish CEO, as an Internet of Things, or IoT, company. “IoT is real, not slideware” says Mike Bell, who joined Silver Spring in late 2015. Bell has an illustrious background: a varied career at Apple before and after Steve Jobs returned to the company, followed by senior stints at Palm and Intel.

He says he took the recruiter call from Silver Spring because he recognized the IoT potential. “We have 26 million devices in the field on every [habitable] continent,” he says, noting that the networks Silver Spring runs on behalf of its utility customers amount to something nearly as powerful as an alternate Internet.

Still, Silver Spring has challenges. It has expanded into non-utility services like managing a municipality’s streetlights to maximize efficiency and minimize downtime. It wants to be more than a smart meter company. Yet three utilities make up nearly 70% of its revenues. And according to its securities filings, Silver Spring faces a bevy of competitors, from giants Cisco, AT&T, and Alcatel-Lucent to smaller players like Sigfox, Ingenu, and a nonprofit cell phone company coalition called the LoRa Alliance, which is focused on IoT.

Silver Spring, which doesn’t make money, is a relative pipsqueak, with a market capitalization of about $600 million. Foundation Capital, one of its venture-capital backers, continues to hold a nearly 20% stake in the company.

Bell is right that IoT is real. His well-positioned company’s slowness in capitalizing on the trend illustrates where the skepticism comes from about it. Making money on an idea is harder than it looks.

Adam Lashinsky
@adamlashinsky
adam_lashinksky@fortune.com

BITS AND BYTES

Facebook shareholders: How much could ‘fake news’ hurt the company? A proxy proposal filed last week suggests that the social networking giant prepare a broad report about the issue. The group is interested learning more about both the overriding threat to democracy and free speech, as well as the risks to Facebook’s revenue model posed by the phenomenon. Facebook’s directors aren’t keen on the idea. (Reuters)

Apple is now officially allowed to test self-driving cars in California. It recently received a permit from state regulators, serving as confirmation that the tech giant, like its big rival Google, is working on autonomous vehicle technologies. But we still don’t know much about the initiative, which reportedly goes by the codename Project Titan–including whether Apple is working on just software or an actual car. (Fortune, New York Times, Fast Company)

Bitcoin proponents beware. A hacker group claims to have figured out a way to break into digital wallets by “brute force,” potentially allowing them to steal the digital currency. Realistically, though, the chances for significant financial gain are pretty slim. (Fortune)

Here’s how hotels are making it rough for upstart Airbnb. The industry is using its lobbying power to encourage regulatory scrutiny of the home-rental company at the local, state, and national level, reports The New York Times. It turns out the American Hotel and Lodging Association–backed by Marriott, Hilton, and Hyatt–was behind both New York’s stricter rules regarding home and apartment rentals, as well as the Federal Trade Commission’s investigation into its business model. (New York Times)

THE DOWNLOAD

Why some cloud deals are fake news. Just under two years ago, NetSuite announced a set of partnerships with Microsoft, including plans to move some of its computing workloads from Amazon Web Services to the Microsoft Azure public cloud.

This was interesting in that it seemed to demonstrate a large software company agreeing to use data center infrastructure from Microsoft, which is a distant second to AWS in public cloud–basically a huge set of computing, storage, and networking resources that one company owns, manages, and rents to multiple customers.

The thing is: This promised move never happened. Fortune‘s Barb Darrow reports on why it’s not all that unusual for a big multi-vendor partnership to die on the vine.

ONE MORE THING

Remembering a pioneer in personal computing. Robert Taylor’s work at the Advanced Research Project Agency led to the creation of Arpanet, the precursor to today’s Internet. Taylor, who was 85 when it passed away last week in Northern California, also worked at the Palo Alto Research Center. There, he helped fund the Alto, one of the ancestors to today’s personal computers. (New York Times)

This edition of Data Sheet was curated by Heather Clancy.
Find past issues. Sign up for other Fortune newsletters.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

The post Data Sheet—Monday, April 17, 2017 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

5G wireless behind AT&T, Verizon’s big buys

By News Aggregator

By Jon Gold

5G technology, despite some fairly breathless hype, is still in the embryonic stages of development, but the pace is quickening. The major U.S. carriers are racing to buy up critical spectrum that will be necessary for the realization of 5G’s potential, which could include support for speeds up to 1Gbps and support for the ever-expanding Internet of Things.

AT&T has made two major purchases with that end in mind – January saw the company announce the acquisition, for an undisclosed sum, of bankrupt wireless backhaul provider FiberTower, and just this week AT&T said that it would spend about $1.6 billion in an all-stock deal to acquire Straight Path Communications (Note: A Reuters report overnight cited sources as saying Verizon might try to top AT&T’s bid).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

The post 5G wireless behind AT&T, Verizon’s big buys appeared on IPv6.net.

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