cloudflare dnssec

Startup Aims to Predict Fires Before They Start

By George Leopold

A predictive analytics startup armed with a patented learning algorithm aimed at security applications along with Internet of Things devices said it has attracted seed funding for a platform that could spot the precursors of impending fires and floods before they start.

OneEvent Technologies said this week it has so far raised $4.3 million to commercialize its predictive learning and analytics engine for building monitoring and security. The cloud-based platform—the IoT version of a smoke alarm—uses wireless sensors to measure factors such as temperature, air quality and humidity. The engine eventually learns what is “normal” for a given structure and issues alerts when it detects an abnormal reading that might indicate fire or flood.

Company founders Dan Parent and Kurt Wedig said a TV segment showing hotel occupants crawling down a smoke-filled hallway, searching for an exit, inspired them. Their idea was spurred by the realization that smoke detectors and fire alarms did little to prevent the fire.

Founded in 2014, the startup based in Mount Horeb, Wis., holds eight U.S. patents on its software platform. The startup is currently testing the predictive alarm system with local fire departments and other agencies using controlled burns to determine how far in advance the OnePrevent system can predict trouble.

During testing at the safety certifier UL (formerly Underwriters Laboratories), OneEvent said signs of a fire were detected by its system up to 20 minutes before smoke alarms sounded.

The predictive learning and analytics engine can, for example, be trained to detect rising temperatures in a kitchen or increasing moisture from a leaking pipe. Each data point collected by wireless sensors can be processed via the OneEvent algorithm, alerting a building manager or homeowner via a smart app on a mobile phone or tablet. “As opportunity in IoT and building monitoring grows, there’s a potential to create solutions that can do more than just alert people to danger as it happens or after the fact,” OneEvent CEO Wedig asserted.

The startup notes that its predictive-alert system is neither a fire nor burglar alarm. Rather, it is positioning the platform as “supplementary protection that empowers users with data and anticipated warnings via a cloud based platform and app.”

Along with first responders and homeowners, the analytics engine also is being pitched to property and casualty insurers, allowing them to “look back in time” to determine whether an insured property was protected by working sensors.

Along with predictive capabilities, embedded sensors also could be used by first responders track the progress of a fire, generating data for investigators and claims adjusters on the cause of a fire.

Recent items:

Can the Internet of Things Help Us Avoid Disasters?

Big Algorithms to Change the World

The post Startup Aims to Predict Fires Before They Start appeared first on Datanami.

Read more here:: www.datanami.com/feed/

Startup Aims to Predict Fires Before They Start

By News Aggregator

By George Leopold

A predictive analytics startup armed with a patented learning algorithm aimed at security applications along with Internet of Things devices said it has attracted seed funding for a platform that could spot the precursors of impending fires and floods before they start.

OneEvent Technologies said this week it has so far raised $4.3 million to commercialize its predictive learning and analytics engine for building monitoring and security. The cloud-based platform—the IoT version of a smoke alarm—uses wireless sensors to measure factors such as temperature, air quality and humidity. The engine eventually learns what is “normal” for a given structure and issues alerts when it detects an abnormal reading that might indicate fire or flood.

Company founders Dan Parent and Kurt Wedig said a TV segment showing hotel occupants crawling down a smoke-filled hallway, searching for an exit, inspired them. Their idea was spurred by the realization that smoke detectors and fire alarms did little to prevent the fire.

Founded in 2014, the startup based in Mount Horeb, Wis., holds eight U.S. patents on its software platform. The startup is currently testing the predictive alarm system with local fire departments and other agencies using controlled burns to determine how far in advance the OnePrevent system can predict trouble.

During testing at the safety certifier UL (formerly Underwriters Laboratories), OneEvent said signs of a fire were detected by its system up to 20 minutes before smoke alarms sounded.

The predictive learning and analytics engine can, for example, be trained to detect rising temperatures in a kitchen or increasing moisture from a leaking pipe. Each data point collected by wireless sensors can be processed via the OneEvent algorithm, alerting a building manager or homeowner via a smart app on a mobile phone or tablet. “As opportunity in IoT and building monitoring grows, there’s a potential to create solutions that can do more than just alert people to danger as it happens or after the fact,” OneEvent CEO Wedig asserted.

The startup notes that its predictive-alert system is neither a fire nor burglar alarm. Rather, it is positioning the platform as “supplementary protection that empowers users with data and anticipated warnings via a cloud based platform and app.”

Along with first responders and homeowners, the analytics engine also is being pitched to property and casualty insurers, allowing them to “look back in time” to determine whether an insured property was protected by working sensors.

Along with predictive capabilities, embedded sensors also could be used by first responders track the progress of a fire, generating data for investigators and claims adjusters on the cause of a fire.

Recent items:

Can the Internet of Things Help Us Avoid Disasters?

Big Algorithms to Change the World

The post Startup Aims to Predict Fires Before They Start appeared first on Datanami.

Read more here:: www.datanami.com/feed/

The post Startup Aims to Predict Fires Before They Start appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Gemalto and IER create the complete end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers

By Sheetal Kumbhar

Digital security, provider Gemalto has teamed up with IER, a designer of solutions that improve the flow of goods and people, to create Fly to Gate. This is described as an end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers. Airport travel is booming; in 2016, there were 3.8 billion passengers and the International Air Transport Association (Source IATA: October […]

The post Gemalto and IER create the complete end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Read more here:: www.m2mnow.biz/feed/

Gemalto and IER create the complete end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers

By News Aggregator

By Sheetal Kumbhar

Digital security, provider Gemalto has teamed up with IER, a designer of solutions that improve the flow of goods and people, to create Fly to Gate. This is described as an end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers. Airport travel is booming; in 2016, there were 3.8 billion passengers and the International Air Transport Association (Source IATA: October […]

The post Gemalto and IER create the complete end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

Read more here:: www.m2mnow.biz/feed/

The post Gemalto and IER create the complete end-to-end self-service airport experience for travellers appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Announcing ION Costa Rica in July

By Megan Kruse

We are happy to announce we’ve just formalized plans to hold our next ION Conference: ION Costa Rica will be held on Monday, 3 July, alongside the Latin American eScience 2017 Meeting and TICAL. We sincerely thank RedCLARA for their enthusiasm and hard work to bring all the pieces together. Also, we are thankful for the ongoing generous support from our ION Conference Series Sponsor, Afilias.

We’ll have a half-day program and cover some combination of our favorite topics including IPv6, DNSSEC, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. We’re working on a draft agenda and will soon be filling the speaker slots, so if you’ll be in San Jose in July or are already planning to attend and you think you might make a good candidate, please speak up in the comments below or via our social media channels. A quick preview of some potential sessions:

  • IPv6 Success Stories – Network Operators Tell All!
  • Deploying DNSSEC: A Case Study
  • What’s Happening at the IETF? Internet Standards and How to Get Involved
  • Where are your MANRS? Working Together to Improve Routing Security

We’re still working out the logistics and registration details, so stay tuned to the ION Costa Rica pages or this blog for more information. We’re also hoping to live stream the ION, so even if you can’t be there in person you’ll be able to follow along online – and we do plan to have onsite simultaneous translation between Spanish and English to maximize participation. (Stay tuned for more information on that as we get closer.)

We’re also working on a couple more ION Conferences for 2017, as well as our 2018 and beyond locations. Are you part of something that might lend itself to co-locating with an ION? Let us know! We hold several events each year in locations all over the world, and we are open to all sorts of opportunities. Contact us to discuss co-location possibilities, or how your company could sponsor an existing ION Conference.

We hope to see you in Costa Rica, or at a future event!

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

Announcing ION Costa Rica in July

By News Aggregator

By Megan Kruse

We are happy to announce we’ve just formalized plans to hold our next ION Conference: ION Costa Rica will be held on Monday, 3 July, alongside the Latin American eScience 2017 Meeting and TICAL. We sincerely thank RedCLARA for their enthusiasm and hard work to bring all the pieces together. Also, we are thankful for the ongoing generous support from our ION Conference Series Sponsor, Afilias.

We’ll have a half-day program and cover some combination of our favorite topics including IPv6, DNSSEC, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. We’re working on a draft agenda and will soon be filling the speaker slots, so if you’ll be in San Jose in July or are already planning to attend and you think you might make a good candidate, please speak up in the comments below or via our social media channels. A quick preview of some potential sessions:

  • IPv6 Success Stories – Network Operators Tell All!
  • Deploying DNSSEC: A Case Study
  • What’s Happening at the IETF? Internet Standards and How to Get Involved
  • Where are your MANRS? Working Together to Improve Routing Security

We’re still working out the logistics and registration details, so stay tuned to the ION Costa Rica pages or this blog for more information. We’re also hoping to live stream the ION, so even if you can’t be there in person you’ll be able to follow along online – and we do plan to have onsite simultaneous translation between Spanish and English to maximize participation. (Stay tuned for more information on that as we get closer.)

We’re also working on a couple more ION Conferences for 2017, as well as our 2018 and beyond locations. Are you part of something that might lend itself to co-locating with an ION? Let us know! We hold several events each year in locations all over the world, and we are open to all sorts of opportunities. Contact us to discuss co-location possibilities, or how your company could sponsor an existing ION Conference.

We hope to see you in Costa Rica, or at a future event!

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Announcing ION Costa Rica in July appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

IoT Spells Trouble for Data Center Security, Networks

By News Aggregator

By Karen Riccio

The Internet of Things has gone from a concept not many people grasped clearly to a tangible, living and breathing phenomenon on the verge of changing the way we live—and the way data centers strategize for the future.

At the very least, data center managers better develop new strategies for handling the IoT and all the data that could overwhelm current systems.

What does that volume of data look like? In the past five years, traffic volume has already increased five-fold; and according to a 2015 study by Cisco, annual global IP traffic will pass a zettabyte and surpass 1.6 zettabytes by 2018. Non-PC devices—expected to double the global population by that year—will generate more than half that traffic.

That spells trouble with a capital “T”. The global growth of data is creating the need for wider information networks and tightened security controls. Each new IoT device potentially creates a new point of vulnerability.

Next month, in a session at Data Center World, titled Data Centers and IoT: There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch, Chris Crosby, CEO of Compass Datacenters, will identify and discuss the problems associated with current networks in relation to the IoT. He will also present the framework for planning for IoT implementation from a security perspective, as well as discussing the new emerging security model that can enable IT to maintain network security while increasing the scope of IT implementations.

From a data center operations perspective, IoT translates into billions of tiny packets from billions of devices. Just a few short years ago, we would have referred to these as Denial of Service attacks, and now data center professionals must develop infrastructures that are able to process this information in real time or it loses its value, Crosby explained.

For example, he referred to how a company’s IoT-based, just-in-time inventory system would suffer serious consequences if there were very long delays in its ability to track the location and volume of component parts.

In order to prevent such delays, Crosby sees growth in more stratified structures in which data, and its processing component, are moving as close to user groups as possible in terms of edge and (small but growing) micro data centers.

“IoT is outstripping the capability of many in-place data centers and driving the evolution to more stratified architectures,” he said.

You might recall a recent and very real-world illustration of a cyberattack that harnessed the massive scale of IoT back on Oct. 21, 2016, when many of the 3 billion internet-addicted people across the globe weren’t able to access social networks, download movies or do much of anything thanks to a DDoS attack. This attack was unlike others.

A DDoS, or Distributed Denial of Service attack, is usually achieved when a hacker(s) bombards a server with so many requests in such a short amount of time that it simply crashes. It’s no different than when a site crashes from too little bandwidth and too much traffic, only this is done intentionally. Even the largest servers, across the widest networks, with the best cybersecurity software in place can fall victim when done on the largest of scales.

One reason the hackers were able to affect so many websites is because they targeted an actual DNS provider (domain name server), in this case a company called Dyn—otherwise it would be impossible to coordinate such a wide-scale attack.

That’s not the first time a DNS provider has been targeted and it probably won’t be the last.

And, while DDoS attacks have been around for quite some time, this latest one that brought down the likes of Amazon, Spotify, Netflix, PayPal, Twitter, and many others, had a new and very troubling nuance. Experts believe hackers tapped into all those intelligent devices connected to the Internet (IoT) to help pull off the massive outage.

The attack on Dyn was unique in that IoT devices – including Internet facing cameras, home routers, baby monitors, and more – were used as part of tens of millions of IP addresses that were infected, connected to a malware-based botnet called Mirai, and then used to attack Dyn’s network of servers. Mirai used IoT devices in order to break into the millions of devices on the Internet, which are poorly guarded, rarely patched, and easy to commandeer with their default or easy-to-guess passwords. And there are a lot of IoT devices out there, and a lot of companies working on creating even more IoT devices.

But, the real story isn’t about the titans of the industry who were taken down in this attack – it’s about everyone else. Millions of other smaller domains were in this tsunami-sized path of digital destruction and businesses got crushed. Despite the associated risks, almost every CIO reading about the attack likely figures that these hackers “only go after the big guys” or “our company isn’t famous enough to get on a hacker’s radar” – think again.

A mid-year 2015 study by HP reported that of the 10 home-based devices it tested (including door locks, thermostats and TVs), 80 percent didn’t require strong passwords and 70 percent had security holes. In fact, the devices—some of which will be used in industrial settings—averaged 25 security flaws each.

Keep in mind, too, that this group of hackers wasn’t going specifically after money, or ransom, or personal identifications; they simply did it to upset the proverbial apple cart—and that they did. Internet outages still disrupt business and can be very costly.

According to Kaspersky’s “Global IT Security Risks Survey 2015 – DDoS Attacks” report, an average damage range of $52,000 to $444,000, depending on company size. Less quantifiable injuries include reputational damage and temporary loss of access to critical business information. Nearly 40 percent of those affected couldn’t perform their core functions. Additionally, one-third of the companies surveyed told Kaspersky they lost contracts and opportunities because of the attacks. Almost as many saw their credit rating decline, and 26 percent reported increased insurance premiums.

So, we’ve got nothing short of a crisis on our hands, one even bigger than originally suspected, and absolutely no budget constraints for what companies across every industry and private and public sectors can spend on securing our businesses, personal lives and national security.

In 2015, companies spent $75 billion on cybersecurity and lost $300 billion. According to Markets and Markets, IT security spending will soar to $101 billion in 2018 and hit $170 billion by 2020.

Data Center World – Global 2017 runs from April 3-6 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. For more information on the event and a detailed look at the educational sessions, visit datacenterworld.com.

A version of this article originally appeared on AFCOM.

Read more here:: datacenterknowledge.com/feed/

The post IoT Spells Trouble for Data Center Security, Networks appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Intel’s Road to Self-Driving Cars Is Paved In Acquisitions

By News Aggregator

By Kirsten Korosec

Intel’s plan to compete in the emerging space of autonomous vehicles has hardly been subtle.

Its latest move to acquire computer vision systems company Mobileye for $15.3 billion is perhaps the biggest signal to date of its intention.

But the world’s largest chipmaker has spent the past 18 months investing in and acquiring companies as well as reorganizing its own business, all in an effort to ensure it doesn’t miss out on the next money-making opportunity.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich says autonomous driving is estimated to be a $70 billion vehicle systems and data services (total addressable market) opportunity by 2030.

This timeline of acquisitions and other activity shows how Intel intends to capture a piece of that market.

To be clear, Intel has a history in automotive. The company and its Wind River unit provides software and hardware products that it calls “In-Vehicle Solutions” and is used in vehicle infotainment systems, including navigation and telematics systems, which are used to provide real-time diagnostics, manage fleets of vehicles, and wireless hot spots.

Its activity in the past 18 months illustrates the company’s plan to expand beyond its existing business.

August 2015: Intel acquires for $16.7 billion a company called Altera that makes a type of chip called a field programmable gate array, or FPGA. Remember FPGA and that it’s different than other chips because it can be reprogrammed after it’s made.

April 2016: Intel acquires Yogitech, an Italian semiconductor designer that specializes in adding safety functions to chips used in self-driving cars and other autonomous devices.

April 2016: Intel’s Wind River unit, which focuses on Internet of Things software, says it has acquired Arynga, which makes software allowing cars to receive over-the-air updates.

May 2016: Intel buys Itseez, a company that specializes in machine vision technology that lets computers see and understand their surroundings. The technology is necessary for an autonomous vehicle, which needs to be able to perceive the world around it.

July 2016: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye announce they will partner to produce self-driving cars for city streets by 2021 and develop the technology as an open platform that can be used other automakers or ride-sharing companies.

September 2016: Intel acquires Moviduis, an AI startup that makes computer vision processors used in drones and virtual reality devices.

November 2016: Krzanich announces that the company’s venture capital arm will invest $250 million over the next two years into autonomous vehicle technology.

November 2016: Intel reorganizes its business to create a new division dedicated to autonomous driving. The new division, called the Automated Driving Group, spun out of its Internet of Things business.

January 2017: Intel launches a Intel GO, a new brand for its software and hardware tools for the development of driverless vehicles.

The brand includes a series of hardware and software development kits to help developers and engineers test and improve autonomous driving applications. The platform takes sensor data from cameras or radars on the vehicle and combines them with high-definition maps and artificial intelligence to determine the path the car is going to take.

Remember the FPGA, and the company Altera that makes them? This new GO platform pairs the FPGA technology with Intel processors.

Intel also launches under the new brand a 5G platform and a modem to help automakers develop and test a wide range of applications ahead of the expected rollout of 5G wireless systems in 2020.

January 2017: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye say they will put a fleet of about 40 autonomous BMW cars on the road by the end of the year.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

The post Intel’s Road to Self-Driving Cars Is Paved In Acquisitions appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Intel’s Road to Self-Driving Cars Is Paved In Acquisitions

By Kirsten Korosec

Intel’s plan to compete in the emerging space of autonomous vehicles has hardly been subtle.

Its latest move to acquire computer vision systems company Mobileye for $15.3 billion is perhaps the biggest signal to date of its intention.

But the world’s largest chipmaker has spent the past 18 months investing in and acquiring companies as well as reorganizing its own business, all in an effort to ensure it doesn’t miss out on the next money-making opportunity.

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich says autonomous driving is estimated to be a $70 billion vehicle systems and data services (total addressable market) opportunity by 2030.

This timeline of acquisitions and other activity shows how Intel intends to capture a piece of that market.

To be clear, Intel has a history in automotive. The company and its Wind River unit provides software and hardware products that it calls “In-Vehicle Solutions” and is used in vehicle infotainment systems, including navigation and telematics systems, which are used to provide real-time diagnostics, manage fleets of vehicles, and wireless hot spots.

Its activity in the past 18 months illustrates the company’s plan to expand beyond its existing business.

August 2015: Intel acquires for $16.7 billion a company called Altera that makes a type of chip called a field programmable gate array, or FPGA. Remember FPGA and that it’s different than other chips because it can be reprogrammed after it’s made.

April 2016: Intel acquires Yogitech, an Italian semiconductor designer that specializes in adding safety functions to chips used in self-driving cars and other autonomous devices.

April 2016: Intel’s Wind River unit, which focuses on Internet of Things software, says it has acquired Arynga, which makes software allowing cars to receive over-the-air updates.

May 2016: Intel buys Itseez, a company that specializes in machine vision technology that lets computers see and understand their surroundings. The technology is necessary for an autonomous vehicle, which needs to be able to perceive the world around it.

July 2016: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye announce they will partner to produce self-driving cars for city streets by 2021 and develop the technology as an open platform that can be used other automakers or ride-sharing companies.

September 2016: Intel acquires Moviduis, an AI startup that makes computer vision processors used in drones and virtual reality devices.

November 2016: Krzanich announces that the company’s venture capital arm will invest $250 million over the next two years into autonomous vehicle technology.

November 2016: Intel reorganizes its business to create a new division dedicated to autonomous driving. The new division, called the Automated Driving Group, spun out of its Internet of Things business.

January 2017: Intel launches a Intel GO, a new brand for its software and hardware tools for the development of driverless vehicles.

The brand includes a series of hardware and software development kits to help developers and engineers test and improve autonomous driving applications. The platform takes sensor data from cameras or radars on the vehicle and combines them with high-definition maps and artificial intelligence to determine the path the car is going to take.

Remember the FPGA, and the company Altera that makes them? This new GO platform pairs the FPGA technology with Intel processors.

Intel also launches under the new brand a 5G platform and a modem to help automakers develop and test a wide range of applications ahead of the expected rollout of 5G wireless systems in 2020.

January 2017: BMW, Intel, and Mobileye say they will put a fleet of about 40 autonomous BMW cars on the road by the end of the year.

Read more here:: fortune.com/tech/feed/

Other IPv6 Stuff at APRICOT 2017

By News Aggregator

By Kevin Meynell

We already covered the IPv6 Deployment session during APRICOT 2017, but there were several other IPv6-related sessions that are worth mentioning.

First thing to mention is that there was a tutorial on deployment of IPv6 in a production mobile network. This was a 1.5-hour session led by Jeff Schmidt (Telstra) and provided some insights into what the business and technical considerations were, and what ended-up actually being deployed on their network.

Jon Brewer (NSRC) is someone who always managed to conjure up interesting talks at APRICOT Conferences, and his tutorial on the Internet-of-Things was no exception. Whilst IoT is not specifically IPv6, it’s likely that IPv6 will be required to facilitate the plethora of devices expected in future.

This tutorial discussed core concepts and the types of applications that are enabled by IoT technologies, before covering radio and network protocols for low-power WANs such as the 802 series, 3GPP and LoRaWAN. Higher-level protocols used in IoT are also discussed including CoAP, MQTT, REST and Websockets.

On a related note, there was also a presentation by Jeff Apcar (Cisco) on the Low Power Wide Area (LPWA). This covered this new area of communications where networks of sensors with limited power availability need to be connected across both urban and rural areas; some over long range wireless networks with substantial RF interference.

Last, but not least, there was the IPv6 Readiness Measurement session. This is an initiative of TWNIC (the Taiwan National Internet Registry) aims to encourage organisations working on IPv6 deployment to share their IPv6 measurement methods and results.

The IPv6 situation in India as presented by Ajai Kumar (NIXI) is becoming interesting, with different measurements calculating IPv6 deployment somewhere between 20 and 40% which makes India the economy with the highest rate of deployment in the Asia-Pacific region. Even more encouragingly, some large organisations including the State Bank of India have even higher rates of deployment, most of the major IXPs are IPv6-enabled, whilst the .in ccTLD also support IPv6.

The Asia-Pacific economy with the second-highest level of IPv6 deployment is Japan, whose situation was presented by Tomohiro Fujisaki (NTT). IPv6 deployment continues to increase and currently sits somewhere just over 20%. However, three major cellular operators have announced they will commence IPv6 services in 2017, whilst a number of fixed-line ISPs have already started to offer commercial ISP services. Some government services are now available via IPv6, although support by the major Japanese content providers still needs to improve.

Things are a bit less positive in Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, although there was substantial progress with IPv6 deployment in Vietnam during 2016, with FPT Telecom becoming the first ISP in the country to offer IPv6 to customers (which we previously discussed). The Taiwanese government has also deployed IPv6 in most of its agencies, has started to offer IPv6 on its public Wi-Fi service (iTaiwan), whilst around 20% of the traffic of TANet (the NREN) is using IPv6.

One of the reasons for limited IPv6 uptake in Korea appears because it has one of the highest user bases in the world, and therefore obtained a large amount of IPv4 resources early on. IPv6 deployment only really started 3 years ago, and then mostly on cellular networks, so that combined with the lack of local content available via IPv6 has provided limited incentives for ISPs to provide this to their customers.

However, regardless of where you are, we encourage you to consider deploying IPv6, so please check our Start Here page for more information!

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Other IPv6 Stuff at APRICOT 2017 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator