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How IoT is getting us closer to zero unplanned downtime

By Zenobia Hegde

As industrial automation continues to digitse, one area in particular is becoming a critical area of concern– unplanned downtime. The shift to outcome-based business models, IoT sensors on connected equipment, and of course, the pervasive and increasing reliance on machines, are all adding to the pressure to avoid outages. Mitigating downtime is a critical, strategic priority in the digital age.

Thankfully, technology has finally caught up to address the problem. IoT enabled connected service is closing this downtime gap. – which is important because it’s not only costly, it’s a fundamental step in an organisation’s digital maturity, and a core part of their transformation journey, says Mark Homer, vice president Global Customer Transformation for ServiceMax, a GE Digital company.

The growing reliance on automation is already widening performance gaps. Businesses are losing sight of assets, especially in terms of efficiency, leading to a fractured insight of manufacturing or service delivery. The upshot is that unplanned downtime becomes a real problem and even worse, the lack of visibility leads to an unnecessary lengthening of recovery time. Closing this downtime gap is a fundamental step in an organisation’s digital maturity, and a core part of their transformation journey.

According to a new Vanson Bourne global study After The Fall: Cost, Causes and Consequences of Unplanned Downtime, 82% companies have experienced at least one unplanned downtime outage over the past three years, and two on average. These outages have lasted four hours.

Depending on the company and type of equipment, this can cost organisations anywhere from $50k (€42.56k)-$150k (€127.69k) per hour for say, a medical device company, and up to $2 million (€1.70 million) for a major outage on an industrial critical asset. (Aberdeen estimates the cost across all businesses to be $260,000 (€221323.69) an hour). The research also revealed high levels of asset estate ignorance across organisations, with seventy percent of companies lacking full awareness of when equipment is due for maintenance, upgrade or replacement.

In addition to financial losses, the research found that almost a third of respondents said they were unable to service or support specific equipment assets, while 65% of respondents from the energy and utilities sector, and 62% from the medical sector cited losing the trust of their customers as a possible impact of suffering a high-profile incident or disaster. Across all sectors, around one in ten admitted their company would never recover from such critical incidents and would ultimately cease to exist.

Nobody wants to be blindsided with those sorts of numbers. But what are companies doing about it?

The research hints at a tipping point in recognition of the problem and planned investment to address it. Over time, zero tolerance and zero unplanned downtime will become the norm as companies develop and invest in their industrial digital strategies. Key to this, is an understanding of and investment in field service management and asset performance management capabilities.

According to Vanson Bourne, eight in ten companies have already recognised this, at least that digital tools can improve visibility of assets and help eliminate unplanned downtime. Around 50% of […]

The post How IoT is getting us closer to zero unplanned downtime appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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How IoT is getting us closer to zero unplanned downtime

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hegde

As industrial automation continues to digitse, one area in particular is becoming a critical area of concern– unplanned downtime. The shift to outcome-based business models, IoT sensors on connected equipment, and of course, the pervasive and increasing reliance on machines, are all adding to the pressure to avoid outages. Mitigating downtime is a critical, strategic priority in the digital age.

Thankfully, technology has finally caught up to address the problem. IoT enabled connected service is closing this downtime gap. – which is important because it’s not only costly, it’s a fundamental step in an organisation’s digital maturity, and a core part of their transformation journey, says Mark Homer, vice president Global Customer Transformation for ServiceMax, a GE Digital company.

The growing reliance on automation is already widening performance gaps. Businesses are losing sight of assets, especially in terms of efficiency, leading to a fractured insight of manufacturing or service delivery. The upshot is that unplanned downtime becomes a real problem and even worse, the lack of visibility leads to an unnecessary lengthening of recovery time. Closing this downtime gap is a fundamental step in an organisation’s digital maturity, and a core part of their transformation journey.

According to a new Vanson Bourne global study After The Fall: Cost, Causes and Consequences of Unplanned Downtime, 82% companies have experienced at least one unplanned downtime outage over the past three years, and two on average. These outages have lasted four hours.

Depending on the company and type of equipment, this can cost organisations anywhere from $50k (€42.56k)-$150k (€127.69k) per hour for say, a medical device company, and up to $2 million (€1.70 million) for a major outage on an industrial critical asset. (Aberdeen estimates the cost across all businesses to be $260,000 (€221323.69) an hour). The research also revealed high levels of asset estate ignorance across organisations, with seventy percent of companies lacking full awareness of when equipment is due for maintenance, upgrade or replacement.

In addition to financial losses, the research found that almost a third of respondents said they were unable to service or support specific equipment assets, while 65% of respondents from the energy and utilities sector, and 62% from the medical sector cited losing the trust of their customers as a possible impact of suffering a high-profile incident or disaster. Across all sectors, around one in ten admitted their company would never recover from such critical incidents and would ultimately cease to exist.

Nobody wants to be blindsided with those sorts of numbers. But what are companies doing about it?

The research hints at a tipping point in recognition of the problem and planned investment to address it. Over time, zero tolerance and zero unplanned downtime will become the norm as companies develop and invest in their industrial digital strategies. Key to this, is an understanding of and investment in field service management and asset performance management capabilities.

According to Vanson Bourne, eight in ten companies have already recognised this, at least that digital tools can improve visibility of assets and help eliminate unplanned downtime. Around 50% of […]

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The post How IoT is getting us closer to zero unplanned downtime appeared on IPv6.net.

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Empowering the Internet of Things by the Blockchain

By Hernaldo Turrillo

Empowering the Internet of Things by Blockchain

Blockchain has been mentioned by virtually all research firms as a rapidly accelerating evolution in technology, and it’s not just about financial services companies. For some experts, the Blockchain is even bigger deal than the Internet itself.

So far, there is an extended thought spread around the world that thinks the Blockchain is just the technology behind the Bitcoin. Indeed, it is, but the blockchain is much more than that and their applications go much further than power all cryptocurrencies out there.

In fact, this one-of-a-kind Distributed Ledger Technology has been gaining enormous attention in areas beyond its cryptocurrency roots since more or less 2014: blockchain and security, blockchain and finance or blockchain and logistics are only a few of its uncharted uses.

An announced alliance: Blockchain and Internet of Things

One of the relationships that is gaining ground lately is how the blockchain can (and it probably will) empower the growing Internet Of Things technology.

Actually, the convergence of blockchain and the Internet of Things is on the agenda for many companies and there are existing implementations, solutions and initiatives in several areas, outside of IoT and financial services too.

According to an article by i-scoop, Internet of Things applications are by definition distributed so it’s only normal that the distributed ledger technology, which blockchain is, will play a role in how devices will communicate directly between each other. That is keeping a ledger and thus trail of not just devices but also how they interact and, potentially, in which state they are and how they are ‘handled’ in the case of tagged goods.

Besides, Blockchain is designed as a basis for applications that involve transaction and interactions. These can include smart contracts or other smart applications that support specific Internet of Things processes.

The IoT devices will speak through smart contracts

This way blockchain technology can improve not just compliance in the IoT but also IoT features and cost-efficiency.

This already named alliance has been overseen by IBM Blockchain. Although it is still in the early days, many tech giants have started to research how blockchain can help the IoT and, of course, the other way around.

For IBM Blockchain, the most interesting will be the combination of AI, IoT and blockchain across industries and in myriad possible IoT applications.

“With blockchain we are pretty much adding to the changing digital infrastructure that powers so many evolutions and impacts so many areas, from analytics to security, in an environment that thus far was centralized.” said from IBM.

The company sums up three key benefits of using blockchain for IoT.

  • Build Trust between parties and devices and reducing risk of collusion and tempering;

  • Reduce Costs by removing overhead associated with middlemen and intermediaries;

  • and Accelerate Transactions reducing settlement time from days to near instantaneous.

Those just to name a few.

The IoT savior

However there are many challenges to solve related to this special relationship, specially on technology and future legal issues in the international matter, many experts have seen the Blockchain as the IoT savior.

In fact, Blockchain technology is able to sort out many of these challenges as they have been tested already in other areas.

Blockchain technology could provide a simple infrastructure for two devices to directly transfer a piece of property such as money or data between one another with a secured and reliable time-stamped contractual handshake. To enable message exchanges, IoT devices will leverage smart contracts which then model the agreement between the two parties.

This feature enables the autonomous functioning of smart devices without the need for centralized authority. If you then extend this peer-to-peer transaction to human to human or human to objects/platforms, you end up with a fully distributed trustworthy digital infrastructure.

Although all of these possible applications are still in the early days of development. There are already some ideas for the companies to start with. We just need to think back a few years ago, the IoT were just a might-happen technology. Now, they are already talking about how secure, recorded and monitored can be the communications between objects.

Thanks, of course, to the blockchain.

The post Empowering the Internet of Things by the Blockchain appeared first on Intelligent Head Quarters.

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Empowering the Internet of Things by the Blockchain

By News Aggregator

By Hernaldo Turrillo

Empowering the Internet of Things by Blockchain

Blockchain has been mentioned by virtually all research firms as a rapidly accelerating evolution in technology, and it’s not just about financial services companies. For some experts, the Blockchain is even bigger deal than the Internet itself.

So far, there is an extended thought spread around the world that thinks the Blockchain is just the technology behind the Bitcoin. Indeed, it is, but the blockchain is much more than that and their applications go much further than power all cryptocurrencies out there.

In fact, this one-of-a-kind Distributed Ledger Technology has been gaining enormous attention in areas beyond its cryptocurrency roots since more or less 2014: blockchain and security, blockchain and finance or blockchain and logistics are only a few of its uncharted uses.

An announced alliance: Blockchain and Internet of Things

One of the relationships that is gaining ground lately is how the blockchain can (and it probably will) empower the growing Internet Of Things technology.

Actually, the convergence of blockchain and the Internet of Things is on the agenda for many companies and there are existing implementations, solutions and initiatives in several areas, outside of IoT and financial services too.

According to an article by i-scoop, Internet of Things applications are by definition distributed so it’s only normal that the distributed ledger technology, which blockchain is, will play a role in how devices will communicate directly between each other. That is keeping a ledger and thus trail of not just devices but also how they interact and, potentially, in which state they are and how they are ‘handled’ in the case of tagged goods.

Besides, Blockchain is designed as a basis for applications that involve transaction and interactions. These can include smart contracts or other smart applications that support specific Internet of Things processes.

The IoT devices will speak through smart contracts

This way blockchain technology can improve not just compliance in the IoT but also IoT features and cost-efficiency.

This already named alliance has been overseen by IBM Blockchain. Although it is still in the early days, many tech giants have started to research how blockchain can help the IoT and, of course, the other way around.

For IBM Blockchain, the most interesting will be the combination of AI, IoT and blockchain across industries and in myriad possible IoT applications.

“With blockchain we are pretty much adding to the changing digital infrastructure that powers so many evolutions and impacts so many areas, from analytics to security, in an environment that thus far was centralized.” said from IBM.

The company sums up three key benefits of using blockchain for IoT.

  • Build Trust between parties and devices and reducing risk of collusion and tempering;

  • Reduce Costs by removing overhead associated with middlemen and intermediaries;

  • and Accelerate Transactions reducing settlement time from days to near instantaneous.

Those just to name a few.

The IoT savior

However there are many challenges to solve related to this special relationship, specially on technology and future legal issues in the international matter, many experts have seen the Blockchain as the IoT savior.

In fact, Blockchain technology is able to sort out many of these challenges as they have been tested already in other areas.

Blockchain technology could provide a simple infrastructure for two devices to directly transfer a piece of property such as money or data between one another with a secured and reliable time-stamped contractual handshake. To enable message exchanges, IoT devices will leverage smart contracts which then model the agreement between the two parties.

This feature enables the autonomous functioning of smart devices without the need for centralized authority. If you then extend this peer-to-peer transaction to human to human or human to objects/platforms, you end up with a fully distributed trustworthy digital infrastructure.

Although all of these possible applications are still in the early days of development. There are already some ideas for the companies to start with. We just need to think back a few years ago, the IoT were just a might-happen technology. Now, they are already talking about how secure, recorded and monitored can be the communications between objects.

Thanks, of course, to the blockchain.

The post Empowering the Internet of Things by the Blockchain appeared first on Intelligent Head Quarters.

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The post Empowering the Internet of Things by the Blockchain appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

SecureLink confirms opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in China

By Zenobia Hedge

SecureLink – Europe’s independent cybersecurity and Managed Security Service provider, confirmed it is opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in Shanghai, China. Laws and regulations covering cybersecurity and data protection are rapidly increasing globally. With the introduction of local expertise and localised services, SecureLink can support its customers with both international cybersecurity challenges and Chinese-specific requirements.

SecureLink’s CDC is built on advanced technology, powered by a strong combination of artificial and human intelligence-driven solutions. This robust foundation, combined with its solid focus on best practice, ensures integrity, quality and security for all its CDC customers helping them realise cybersecurity as an enabler.

Speaking about this move, SecureLink’s CEO – Marco Barkmeijer said, “Cyber-crime doesn’t respect borders, so we’re working to remove ours to deliver continuously reliable cybersecurity worldwide. We recognised that our customers were increasingly looking for a trusted cybersecurity partner in China. By opening our new CDC in Shanghai, they now have someone that they can trust, providing the reassurance that their cybersecurity requirements will be managed globally.”

Marco Barkmeijer

In June 2016 SecureLink acquired Coresec securing a market leadership position in the Nordics, closely followed by its acquisition of Nebulas in August 2016 to gain a market leadership position in the UK. In December it then acquired IT Cube Systems securing the market leadership position in Germany/DACH region.

SecureLink was recognised by PWC as a leader in European Cyber Security emerging market report in January 2017 and listed as a representative vendor in Gartner’s market guide for Managed Detection & Response services in June 2017. The new Shanghai CDC is the latest milestone in SecureLink’s expansion.

Marco concludes, “At SecureLink we are, of course, proud that our international customers want us to follow them worldwide. This means that other companies can also come to us knowing that we have the strength, resources and knowledge to ensure their security anytime, anywhere. We learn and improve based on the data we see daily, and with this new source of information we can deliver an even higher quality service. SecureLink is committed to safely enabling its customers businesses, both today and tomorrow.

To find out more about SecureLink, its services and solutions, click here

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post SecureLink confirms opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in China appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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SecureLink confirms opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in China

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hedge

SecureLink – Europe’s independent cybersecurity and Managed Security Service provider, confirmed it is opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in Shanghai, China. Laws and regulations covering cybersecurity and data protection are rapidly increasing globally. With the introduction of local expertise and localised services, SecureLink can support its customers with both international cybersecurity challenges and Chinese-specific requirements.

SecureLink’s CDC is built on advanced technology, powered by a strong combination of artificial and human intelligence-driven solutions. This robust foundation, combined with its solid focus on best practice, ensures integrity, quality and security for all its CDC customers helping them realise cybersecurity as an enabler.

Speaking about this move, SecureLink’s CEO – Marco Barkmeijer said, “Cyber-crime doesn’t respect borders, so we’re working to remove ours to deliver continuously reliable cybersecurity worldwide. We recognised that our customers were increasingly looking for a trusted cybersecurity partner in China. By opening our new CDC in Shanghai, they now have someone that they can trust, providing the reassurance that their cybersecurity requirements will be managed globally.”

Marco Barkmeijer

In June 2016 SecureLink acquired Coresec securing a market leadership position in the Nordics, closely followed by its acquisition of Nebulas in August 2016 to gain a market leadership position in the UK. In December it then acquired IT Cube Systems securing the market leadership position in Germany/DACH region.

SecureLink was recognised by PWC as a leader in European Cyber Security emerging market report in January 2017 and listed as a representative vendor in Gartner’s market guide for Managed Detection & Response services in June 2017. The new Shanghai CDC is the latest milestone in SecureLink’s expansion.

Marco concludes, “At SecureLink we are, of course, proud that our international customers want us to follow them worldwide. This means that other companies can also come to us knowing that we have the strength, resources and knowledge to ensure their security anytime, anywhere. We learn and improve based on the data we see daily, and with this new source of information we can deliver an even higher quality service. SecureLink is committed to safely enabling its customers businesses, both today and tomorrow.

To find out more about SecureLink, its services and solutions, click here

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post SecureLink confirms opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in China appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post SecureLink confirms opening a Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) in China appeared on IPv6.net.

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Building cross-boundary collaborative solutions for next-gen IoT-enabled operations

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hedge

Over the past few decades, IIoT technologies have crept into virtually every aspect of industrial automation and operations. Seamless connectivity, technology-agnostic interoperability and data-uniformity have enabled operators to easily monitor, manage and leverage data from any number of proprietary assets and processes in ways that, before, were simply cost prohibitive.

During this time, we’ve also seen the influence of the IIoT extend beyond the factory floor to the cloud. The omnipresent IoT liberates inexhaustible quantities of real-time data and metrics that flow cloud-bound to feed insatiable analytics, predictive AI and enterprise data applications; a holy grail manifested in the form of absolute (almost clairvoyant) awareness, intelligence and knowledge… at least this was the plan, says Nitesh Arora, head of Marketing of Cloudleaf.

Pretty sensational stuff, so let’s come down to earth and talk facts:

All too often, these IoT solutions were designed, implemented and managed on the underlying principle of providing efficiency through automation. In the race to digitise, far less thought was given to the real value of the IoT and its ability to help enterprises future-proof their capital investments by providing the means (not the end) to solving real-world business challenges.

As a matter of course, many enterprises implemented technology simply for technology’s sake and after the novelty wore off, operators were left with yet one more system to learn, maintain and pay-off. Even under the best scenarios, operation managers found that their IoT footprint was anything but low-overhead; the majority of IoT solutions on the market require significant allocation of implementation, integration and training resources.

More importantly, these solutions added unnecessary operational complexity that forced enterprises to shift focus from their core-competencies, building collaborate partnerships, managing staff, enhancing customer user-experiences and maintaining government mandated safety standards.

Today, few industrial IoT solutions are engineered from the ground-up to solve business challenges and uncover opportunities in a sustainable value-added way, and if you ask operation managers what their top 4 pain-points are, they’ll likely say:

I don’t have a way to efficiently orchestrate our complex workflows of materials, tools and people,
I can’t track the location or condition of my assets, or prevent them from getting lost or stolen
I have no idea how to leverage our partner relationships and tie into their inventory systems
I don’t have a good way of keeping my operational costs in check

Fortunately a new-breed of IoT solutions has recently come on-line offering a collection of robust technologies that go the extra mile to provide simplicity and the sustainable industry-centric solutions operation managers are looking for. So before we get ahead of our skis, let’s take a look a 4 essential ingredients that go into successful IoT asset tracking and workflow optimisation solutions:

Robust and battle-tested tech

IoT solutions must be able to rely on technology that is robust, interoperable, cost-effective and offers high-availability functioning. By equipping assets with unobtrusive medium-range wireless transmitters (such as Bluetooth-low-energy), plant managers can quickly build smart networks of IoT-capable sensors, gateways and channel and real-time operational data into their cloud applications.

This provides managers with virtually unlimited control over large groups of […]

The post Building cross-boundary collaborative solutions for next-gen IoT-enabled operations appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post Building cross-boundary collaborative solutions for next-gen IoT-enabled operations appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Building cross-boundary collaborative solutions for next-gen IoT-enabled operations

By Zenobia Hedge

Over the past few decades, IIoT technologies have crept into virtually every aspect of industrial automation and operations. Seamless connectivity, technology-agnostic interoperability and data-uniformity have enabled operators to easily monitor, manage and leverage data from any number of proprietary assets and processes in ways that, before, were simply cost prohibitive.

During this time, we’ve also seen the influence of the IIoT extend beyond the factory floor to the cloud. The omnipresent IoT liberates inexhaustible quantities of real-time data and metrics that flow cloud-bound to feed insatiable analytics, predictive AI and enterprise data applications; a holy grail manifested in the form of absolute (almost clairvoyant) awareness, intelligence and knowledge… at least this was the plan, says Nitesh Arora, head of Marketing of Cloudleaf.

Pretty sensational stuff, so let’s come down to earth and talk facts:

All too often, these IoT solutions were designed, implemented and managed on the underlying principle of providing efficiency through automation. In the race to digitise, far less thought was given to the real value of the IoT and its ability to help enterprises future-proof their capital investments by providing the means (not the end) to solving real-world business challenges.

As a matter of course, many enterprises implemented technology simply for technology’s sake and after the novelty wore off, operators were left with yet one more system to learn, maintain and pay-off. Even under the best scenarios, operation managers found that their IoT footprint was anything but low-overhead; the majority of IoT solutions on the market require significant allocation of implementation, integration and training resources.

More importantly, these solutions added unnecessary operational complexity that forced enterprises to shift focus from their core-competencies, building collaborate partnerships, managing staff, enhancing customer user-experiences and maintaining government mandated safety standards.

Today, few industrial IoT solutions are engineered from the ground-up to solve business challenges and uncover opportunities in a sustainable value-added way, and if you ask operation managers what their top 4 pain-points are, they’ll likely say:

I don’t have a way to efficiently orchestrate our complex workflows of materials, tools and people,
I can’t track the location or condition of my assets, or prevent them from getting lost or stolen
I have no idea how to leverage our partner relationships and tie into their inventory systems
I don’t have a good way of keeping my operational costs in check

Fortunately a new-breed of IoT solutions has recently come on-line offering a collection of robust technologies that go the extra mile to provide simplicity and the sustainable industry-centric solutions operation managers are looking for. So before we get ahead of our skis, let’s take a look a 4 essential ingredients that go into successful IoT asset tracking and workflow optimisation solutions:

Robust and battle-tested tech

IoT solutions must be able to rely on technology that is robust, interoperable, cost-effective and offers high-availability functioning. By equipping assets with unobtrusive medium-range wireless transmitters (such as Bluetooth-low-energy), plant managers can quickly build smart networks of IoT-capable sensors, gateways and channel and real-time operational data into their cloud applications.

This provides managers with virtually unlimited control over large groups of […]

The post Building cross-boundary collaborative solutions for next-gen IoT-enabled operations appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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Teradata Climbs Up the Stack with ‘Analytics Platform’ Strategy

By Alex Woodie

Teradata is extending the types of data, algorithms, and frameworks it can store and run in its flagship MPP database as part of the new Teradata Analytics Platform unveiled at its annual user conference today. Shipping early next year, the new platform is being billed as the next iteration of the enterprise data warehouse, and a one-stop shop for all of its customers’ analytic needs.

For most of its history, Teradata has focused its efforts on building core underlying data storage and management functions into its massively parallel processing (MPP), column-oriented relational database. With that foundation in place, customers could then write their own analytic routines using SQL, run pre-generated SQL from business intelligence tools, or run packaged analytic applications from the likes of SAS and other vendors.

The company revealed a desire to go “up the stack” in 2011, when it spent $230 million to acquire Aster Data Systems. Aster had developed SQL- and MapReduce-based software that let customers analyze large amounts of semi-structured and unstructured data, such as Internet clickstreams and social media activity, for the purpose of generating product recommendations, detecting fraud, and reducing churn.

While Aster helped Teradata break into the burgeoning market for big data analytics, the Aster technology hasn’t been fully integrated with the company’s traditional EDW business. There were integration points, such as the QueryGrid functionality Teradata unveiled in 2014, and its foray into pushdown processing. But the two products largely lived separate lives.

That separation will be erased when Aster technology is fully ported to run within Teradata’s EDW. That’s part and parcel of the Teradata Analytics Platform plan, says Imad Birouty, Teradata’s director of product marketing.

The Teradata Analytics Platform is a superset of traditional EDW and emerging data science capabilities

“We’re actually moving Aster and Teradata together. This is step number one in…bringing those analytics over,” Birouty tells Datanami. “We’re taking those advanced analytic functions that were in Aster, and we’re porting them over to the Teradata database. So those will be embedded directly in the database.”

The plan calls for having the first batch of Aster functions — including path analysis, attribution, text analysis, sessionization, and time series analytics –available in version 16.20 of the Teradata database in the first half of 2018, Birouty says. A second batch of Aster functions, including graph functions and other capabilities, are slated for an update that ships in the second half of the year, he adds.

“[Aster] was multi genre. It did graph functions. It did machine learning. It did text analytics. It did a lot of things, and so we’re bringing all those over, little by little,” Birouty says. Eventually, all of Aster’s functions will be ported to run under the Teradata database, and Aster will cease to exist. “It’s going to take a couple of years to do that.”

About a year from now, the Teradata EDW will be updated to natively support other analytic frameworks, including things like Apache Spark, Tensorflow, Theano, and even Gluon, the new machine learning library recently unveiled by Microsoft and AWS. “We’re looking at a lot of the popular tools out there and whatever is the hottest thing, we’ll plug them in,” Birouty says.

These frameworks will be brought into Teradata by way of a “pluggable architecture” that the company is building into its Teradata Analytics Platform, according to Birouty. When it’s ready, the architecture will be transparent to the user and work entirely “under the covers,” he says. However, that system isn’t quite cooked. “We’re not there yet,” he adds.

Teradata is seeking to be just as open when it comes to languages like R and Python and tools like SAS, KNIME, RStudio, Jupyter, and Dataiku, the company says. The database warehouse already had support for JSON data types, and support for Avro and other data formats will be added.

Centralizing the data and the analytics in the Teradata EDW will bring several benefits to customers. For starters, it will minimize the time and expense of moving data over the network. It will also eliminate the need for the IT department to maintain additional systems.

Co-mingling different data sets and data types will also allow customers to experiment with new analytic techniques, Birouty says. “You can imagine you can do some pretty amazing things if you have all these analytics together,” he says. “You can analyze the data that’s in your warehouse and IoT data together.”

For example, a trucking company could use sensor data to track the movement of its trucks while also monitoring the content of the cargo or special business relationships. If the IoT data indicates a delivery to a particular customer is going to be late, while the EDW data shows that the cargo is sensitive or the customer relationship has a special attribute, the trucking outfit could take pains to expedite the delivery or alert the customer to the late delivery.

“This is pretty much unprecedented in the capabilities that it’s bringing together, all at the fingertips of the user,” Birouty says. “The users don’t have to worry about separate pools. All the analytic functions, the tools they have, the data types, are all supported within this Teradata Analytics Platform. You can operatize the insights and deploy them to all the users. Pretty powerful stuff.”

Rather than a dramatic course change, however, the unveiling of the Teradata Analytics Platform represents an extension of the company’s previous strategy, Birouty says. “We refer to the future of the data warehouse as the analytics platform,” he says. “So the Teradata Analytics Platform is a superset [of capabilities] — the next generation with more capabilities than just the data warehouse today.”

Teradata also announced IntelliSphere, a prepackaged set of tools often used in data science and data analysis work. “We put together a software package … that are all the products you need to put together your analytic ecosystem,” Birouty says. “All the software you need to ingest data, to mange it, to deploy apps within the environment, to access the data.”

The company made the announcements today at Partners, its annual user conference, which is taking place this week in Anaheim, California.

Related Items:

Teradata Makes Data Warehouse More Hadoop-ish

Teradata Puts Aster in Hadoop for IoT Analytics

Teradata Adds Graph Engine to the Data Discovery Mix with Aster 6

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Teradata Climbs Up the Stack with ‘Analytics Platform’ Strategy

By News Aggregator

By Alex Woodie

Teradata is extending the types of data, algorithms, and frameworks it can store and run in its flagship MPP database as part of the new Teradata Analytics Platform unveiled at its annual user conference today. Shipping early next year, the new platform is being billed as the next iteration of the enterprise data warehouse, and a one-stop shop for all of its customers’ analytic needs.

For most of its history, Teradata has focused its efforts on building core underlying data storage and management functions into its massively parallel processing (MPP), column-oriented relational database. With that foundation in place, customers could then write their own analytic routines using SQL, run pre-generated SQL from business intelligence tools, or run packaged analytic applications from the likes of SAS and other vendors.

The company revealed a desire to go “up the stack” in 2011, when it spent $230 million to acquire Aster Data Systems. Aster had developed SQL- and MapReduce-based software that let customers analyze large amounts of semi-structured and unstructured data, such as Internet clickstreams and social media activity, for the purpose of generating product recommendations, detecting fraud, and reducing churn.

While Aster helped Teradata break into the burgeoning market for big data analytics, the Aster technology hasn’t been fully integrated with the company’s traditional EDW business. There were integration points, such as the QueryGrid functionality Teradata unveiled in 2014, and its foray into pushdown processing. But the two products largely lived separate lives.

That separation will be erased when Aster technology is fully ported to run within Teradata’s EDW. That’s part and parcel of the Teradata Analytics Platform plan, says Imad Birouty, Teradata’s director of product marketing.

The Teradata Analytics Platform is a superset of traditional EDW and emerging data science capabilities

“We’re actually moving Aster and Teradata together. This is step number one in…bringing those analytics over,” Birouty tells Datanami. “We’re taking those advanced analytic functions that were in Aster, and we’re porting them over to the Teradata database. So those will be embedded directly in the database.”

The plan calls for having the first batch of Aster functions — including path analysis, attribution, text analysis, sessionization, and time series analytics –available in version 16.20 of the Teradata database in the first half of 2018, Birouty says. A second batch of Aster functions, including graph functions and other capabilities, are slated for an update that ships in the second half of the year, he adds.

“[Aster] was multi genre. It did graph functions. It did machine learning. It did text analytics. It did a lot of things, and so we’re bringing all those over, little by little,” Birouty says. Eventually, all of Aster’s functions will be ported to run under the Teradata database, and Aster will cease to exist. “It’s going to take a couple of years to do that.”

About a year from now, the Teradata EDW will be updated to natively support other analytic frameworks, including things like Apache Spark, Tensorflow, Theano, and even Gluon, the new machine learning library recently unveiled by Microsoft and AWS. “We’re looking at a lot of the popular tools out there and whatever is the hottest thing, we’ll plug them in,” Birouty says.

These frameworks will be brought into Teradata by way of a “pluggable architecture” that the company is building into its Teradata Analytics Platform, according to Birouty. When it’s ready, the architecture will be transparent to the user and work entirely “under the covers,” he says. However, that system isn’t quite cooked. “We’re not there yet,” he adds.

Teradata is seeking to be just as open when it comes to languages like R and Python and tools like SAS, KNIME, RStudio, Jupyter, and Dataiku, the company says. The database warehouse already had support for JSON data types, and support for Avro and other data formats will be added.

Centralizing the data and the analytics in the Teradata EDW will bring several benefits to customers. For starters, it will minimize the time and expense of moving data over the network. It will also eliminate the need for the IT department to maintain additional systems.

Co-mingling different data sets and data types will also allow customers to experiment with new analytic techniques, Birouty says. “You can imagine you can do some pretty amazing things if you have all these analytics together,” he says. “You can analyze the data that’s in your warehouse and IoT data together.”

For example, a trucking company could use sensor data to track the movement of its trucks while also monitoring the content of the cargo or special business relationships. If the IoT data indicates a delivery to a particular customer is going to be late, while the EDW data shows that the cargo is sensitive or the customer relationship has a special attribute, the trucking outfit could take pains to expedite the delivery or alert the customer to the late delivery.

“This is pretty much unprecedented in the capabilities that it’s bringing together, all at the fingertips of the user,” Birouty says. “The users don’t have to worry about separate pools. All the analytic functions, the tools they have, the data types, are all supported within this Teradata Analytics Platform. You can operatize the insights and deploy them to all the users. Pretty powerful stuff.”

Rather than a dramatic course change, however, the unveiling of the Teradata Analytics Platform represents an extension of the company’s previous strategy, Birouty says. “We refer to the future of the data warehouse as the analytics platform,” he says. “So the Teradata Analytics Platform is a superset [of capabilities] — the next generation with more capabilities than just the data warehouse today.”

Teradata also announced IntelliSphere, a prepackaged set of tools often used in data science and data analysis work. “We put together a software package … that are all the products you need to put together your analytic ecosystem,” Birouty says. “All the software you need to ingest data, to mange it, to deploy apps within the environment, to access the data.”

The company made the announcements today at Partners, its annual user conference, which is taking place this week in Anaheim, California.

Related Items:

Teradata Makes Data Warehouse More Hadoop-ish

Teradata Puts Aster in Hadoop for IoT Analytics

Teradata Adds Graph Engine to the Data Discovery Mix with Aster 6

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