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FreeWave and Baud Telecom to Roll Out WavePro Installation With Saudi Electricity Company

By News Aggregator

By IoT

FreeWave Technologies, a leader in industrial, secure Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) wireless networking solutions, announced a strategic partnership with Baud Telecom Company, one of the largest integrated ICT solution providers in the Middle East. FreeWave and Baud Telecom Company have recently combined their expertise to deliver an extremely rugged, yet flexible, industrial IoT networking solution for Saudi Electric Company (SEC). SEC was the first customer to certify and deploy FreeWave’s new WavePro (WP201) shorthaul Point- to-Point and Wi-Fi hotspot platform. Installed since October 2015 with 100 percent uptime, WavePro provides SEC with an outdoor self-healing network at a remote power plant, enabling the secure collection, control and transport of Voice, Video, Data and Sensor data (VVDS).

“Our customers demand that we deliver the best ICT solutions and services available, and therefore we must be highly selective in the partnerships we create,” explained Omar Al Charif, Telecom Business Unit Manager for BTC. “After rigorous review of many alternatives, we are excited to partner with a reputable industrial IoT communication technology partner such as FreeWave, and are confident that we’ll be able bring the value, high performance, security and reliability that our customers expect.”

The first project for Baud Telecom Company and FreeWave was to provide SEC, the premier power provider in the Gulf, with reliable and secure IoT networking at a remote power plant site in the desert. With constant sand blasts and temperatures rising to 65 degrees Centigrade (145 degrees Fahrenheit), the need to deploy extremely rugged field systems is a must. Additionally, the significant amount of metal located at the power plant made it even more difficult for radio frequency (RF) based communications to work effectively. Despite these challenges, BTC and FreeWave were able to successfully and rapidly deploy a WavePro network to solve the following industrial IoT applications:

  • Self-healing Wi-Fi mesh network over the power plant
  • Voice over IP (VoIP) communications
  • Security camera control and video transport back to a central monitoring center
  • SCADA networking for monitoring the inbound water quality for cooling applications
  • AMI backhaul networking to help manage energy consumption within the smart grid
  • Wi-Fi hotspot for the residents of the neighboring village

Abdul Aziz Al Sultan, telecom engineering and substation automation department manager at SEC/NG SA, said: “We require a robust solution for time-critical applications. With FreeWave WavePro, we are confident that we have found a reliable and flexible platform that can be deployed quickly and cost-effectively integrated into our network.”

By incorporating dual-band, concurrently operational radios (2.4GHz and 5GHz) into an IP67 enclosure, WavePro brings industrial-grade communications to the harshest of environments without fail. It’s an ideal field area network solution for oil and gas, utilities, mining, power plants, municipalities, disaster recovery and many other industrial applications. WavePro is also a global solution, homologating in a number of countries beyond the USA including Canada, LATAM, the Middle East, the Far East and Europe.

“Being able to partner with the premier systems integrator in the Middle East is a significant step forward for FreeWave,” said Kim Niederman, CEO of FreeWave. “We are thrilled for the opportunity to work with Baud Telecom Company and its customers, as we strive to help solve the most complex and demanding industrial IoT networking applications in the world.”

For more information, please visit www.freewave.com.

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Cellular M2M modules to reach $2.2bn in 2019: Wireless terminals growing even faster, says new Beecham report

By Milan Goldas

A new report from Beecham Research predicts rapid growth in the sales of M2M cellular modules and wireless terminals to end 2019, with volumes shipped reaching 154% and 166% of 2014 levels, respectively. Cellular M2M modules are expected to reach $2.2bn in sales in 2019. Despite the move to 3G and 4G and talk of […]

The post Cellular M2M modules to reach $2.2bn in 2019: Wireless terminals growing even faster, says new Beecham report appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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RFC 3232 – Assigned Numbers: RFC 1700 is Replaced by an On-line Database

Network Working Group                                J. Reynolds, Editor
Request for Comments: 3232                                    RFC Editor
Obsoletes: 1700                                             January 2002
Category: Informational


Assigned Numbers: RFC 1700 is Replaced by an On-line Database


Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2002).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This memo obsoletes RFC 1700 (STD 2) "Assigned Numbers", which
   contained an October 1994 snapshot of assigned Internet protocol
   parameters.

Description

   From November 1977 through October 1994, the Internet Assigned
   Numbers Authority (IANA) periodically published tables of the
   Internet protocol parameter assignments in RFCs entitled, "Assigned
   Numbers".  The most current of these Assigned Numbers RFCs had
   Standard status and carried the designation: STD 2.  At this time,
   the latest STD 2 is RFC 1700.

   Since 1994, this sequence of RFCs have been replaced by an online
   database accessible through a web page (currently, www.iana.org).
   The purpose of the present RFC is to note this fact and to officially
   obsolete RFC 1700, whose status changes to Historic.  RFC 1700 is
   obsolete, and its values are incomplete and in some cases may be
   wrong.

   We expect this series to be revived in the future by the new IANA
   organization.

Security Considerations

   This memo does not affect the technical security of the Internet.





Reynolds                     Informational                      [Page 1]

RFC 3232         RFC 1700 Replaced by On-line Database      January 2002


Author's Address

   Joyce K. Reynolds
   RFC Editor
   4676 Admiralty Way
   Marina del Rey, CA  90292
   USA

   EMail: rfc-editor@rfc-editor.org

NCSC has published a new version of their IPv6 white paper

The Dutch National Cyber Security Centre has put a new version (2.0) of their IPv6 white paper online. It is written in cooperation with a number of experts from public and private organizations. Dennis Silva and I also helped out and our article “Niets doen is geen optie”, published in Computable 04-06-2012, was used as one of the references. This article was based on our own IPv6 white paper that we wrote last year and it provided interesting input for discussions on what transition scenarios are feasible and what risks they come with.

It was great to be part of this and I’m proud to see our names, and the company’s, being mentioned in the list of references and contributors. 🙂

The paper is published here: http://www.ncsc.nl/dienstverlening/expertise-advies/kennisdeling/whitepapers/ip-versie-6-ipv6.html

In this version of the IPv6 paper, there is more focus on security risks of migration scenarios. Depletion of the IPv4 address space means that everyone at some point has to decide on an IPv6 strategy. With every scenario, whether it is ‘doing nothing’ or going for a full native IPv6 implementation, comes risk. For instance, 6in4 tunnels can provide unwanted access into secured networks and the default enabled IPv6 in many OSes can provide unnoticed connectivity between nodes that are thought to be isolated.

Erwin

RFC 2464 – Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks

Network Working Group M. Crawford
Request for Comments: 2464 Fermilab
Obsoletes: 1972 December 1998
Category: Standards Track

Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

1. Introduction

This document specifies the frame format for transmission of IPv6
packets and the method of forming IPv6 link-local addresses and
statelessly autoconfigured addresses on Ethernet networks. It also
specifies the content of the Source/Target Link-layer Address option
used in Router Solicitation, Router Advertisement, Neighbor
Solicitation, Neighbor Advertisement and Redirect messages when those
messages are transmitted on an Ethernet.

This document replaces RFC 1972, "A Method for the Transmission of
IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks", which will become historic.

The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC 2119].

2. Maximum Transmission Unit

The default MTU size for IPv6 [IPV6] packets on an Ethernet is 1500
octets. This size may be reduced by a Router Advertisement [DISC]
containing an MTU option which specifies a smaller MTU, or by manual
configuration of each node. If a Router Advertisement received on an
Ethernet interface has an MTU option specifying an MTU larger than
1500, or larger than a manually configured value, that MTU option may
be logged to system management but must be otherwise ignored.

For purposes of this document, information received from DHCP is
considered "manually configured" and the term Ethernet includes
CSMA/CD and full-duplex subnetworks based on ISO/IEC 8802-3, with
various data rates.

3. Frame Format

IPv6 packets are transmitted in standard Ethernet frames. The
Ethernet header contains the Destination and Source Ethernet
addresses and the Ethernet type code, which must contain the value
86DD hexadecimal. The data field contains the IPv6 header followed
immediately by the payload, and possibly padding octets to meet the
minimum frame size for the Ethernet link.

0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Destination |
+- -+
| Ethernet |
+- -+
| Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Source |
+- -+
| Ethernet |
+- -+
| Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IPv6 |
+- -+
| header |
+- -+
| and |
+- -+
/ payload ... /
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

(Each tic mark represents one bit.)

4. Stateless Autoconfiguration

The Interface Identifier [AARCH] for an Ethernet interface is based
on the EUI-64 identifier [EUI64] derived from the interface's built-
in 48-bit IEEE 802 address. The EUI-64 is formed as follows.
(Canonical bit order is assumed throughout.)

The OUI of the Ethernet address (the first three octets) becomes the
company_id of the EUI-64 (the first three octets). The fourth and
fifth octets of the EUI are set to the fixed value FFFE hexadecimal.
The last three octets of the Ethernet address become the last three
octets of the EUI-64.

The Interface Identifier is then formed from the EUI-64 by
complementing the "Universal/Local" (U/L) bit, which is the next-to-
lowest order bit of the first octet of the EUI-64. Complementing
this bit will generally change a 0 value to a 1, since an interface's
built-in address is expected to be from a universally administered
address space and hence have a globally unique value. A universally
administered IEEE 802 address or an EUI-64 is signified by a 0 in the
U/L bit position, while a globally unique IPv6 Interface Identifier
is signified by a 1 in the corresponding position. For further
discussion on this point, see [AARCH].

For example, the Interface Identifier for an Ethernet interface whose
built-in address is, in hexadecimal,

34-56-78-9A-BC-DE

would be

36-56-78-FF-FE-9A-BC-DE.

A different MAC address set manually or by software should not be
used to derive the Interface Identifier. If such a MAC address must
be used, its global uniqueness property should be reflected in the
value of the U/L bit.

An IPv6 address prefix used for stateless autoconfiguration [ACONF]
of an Ethernet interface must have a length of 64 bits.

5. Link-Local Addresses

The IPv6 link-local address [AARCH] for an Ethernet interface is
formed by appending the Interface Identifier, as defined above, to
the prefix FE80::/64.

10 bits 54 bits 64 bits
+----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+
|1111111010| (zeros) | Interface Identifier |
+----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+

6. Address Mapping -- Unicast

The procedure for mapping IPv6 unicast addresses into Ethernet link-
layer addresses is described in [DISC]. The Source/Target Link-layer
Address option has the following form when the link layer is
Ethernet.

0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
+- Ethernet -+
| |
+- Address -+
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

Option fields:

Type 1 for Source Link-layer address.
2 for Target Link-layer address.

Length 1 (in units of 8 octets).

Ethernet Address
The 48 bit Ethernet IEEE 802 address, in canonical bit
order. This is the address the interface currently
responds to, and may be different from the built-in
address used to derive the Interface Identifier.

7. Address Mapping -- Multicast

An IPv6 packet with a multicast destination address DST, consisting
of the sixteen octets DST[1] through DST[16], is transmitted to the
Ethernet multicast address whose first two octets are the value 3333
hexadecimal and whose last four octets are the last four octets of
DST.

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1|0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| DST[13] | DST[14] |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| DST[15] | DST[16] |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

8. Differences From RFC 1972

The following are the functional differences between this
specification and RFC 1972.

The Address Token, which was a node's 48-bit MAC address, is
replaced with the Interface Identifier, which is 64 bits in
length and based on the EUI-64 format [EUI64]. An IEEE-defined
mapping exists from 48-bit MAC addresses to EUI-64 form.

A prefix used for stateless autoconfiguration must now be 64 bits
long rather than 80. The link-local prefix is also shortened to
64 bits.

9. Security Considerations

The method of derivation of Interface Identifiers from MAC addresses
is intended to preserve global uniqueness when possible. However,
there is no protection from duplication through accident or forgery.

10. References

[AARCH] Hinden, R. and S. Deering "IP Version 6 Addressing
Architecture", RFC 2373, July 1998.

[ACONF] Thomson, S. and T. Narten, "IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration", RFC 2462, December 1998.

[DISC] Narten, T., Nordmark, E. and W. Simpson, "Neighbor Discovery
for IP Version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 2461, December 1998.

[EUI64] "Guidelines For 64-bit Global Identifier (EUI-64)",
http://standards.ieee.org/db/oui/tutorials/EUI64.html

[IPV6] Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
(IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.

[RFC 2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

11. Author's Address

Matt Crawford
Fermilab MS 368
PO Box 500
Batavia, IL 60510
USA

Phone: +1 630 840-3461
EMail: crawdad@fnal.gov

12. Full Copyright Statement

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are
included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this
document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
English.

The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.

This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
"AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.