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Digitalisation-not just for big business

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hegde

When cellphones were first released in the mid-1980s, a handset would set you back $4000 (€3378.98) — the equivalent of almost $10,000 (€8447.45) today. Here, Markus Brettschneider, group senior vice president and general manager for global food & beverage applications for ABB, explains how smaller food manufacturers can take advantage of low-cost digital technology.

When the first cellphone was released in 1983, this breakthrough technology was reserved for high-ranking business people and the social elite. Yet, decreasing technological costs have led to cellphones becoming arguably the most common technology available today. In fact, the UN’s 2014 telecommunications figures revealed that there are almost as many cellphone subscriptions as there are people on Earth.

This is indicative of a technological trend known as quality-adjusted price, which ties closely into the concept of Moore’s law. As technology rapidly develops at a pace that leads to significant performance increases year on year, the cost of that technology decreases at a similar pace.

This presents an important opportunity for smaller businesses to take advantage of newer technologies that were previously only accessible to large companies. In the food production industry, for example, there has been a significant increase in the adoption of digital technologies and software among larger businesses.Yet, food manufacturing companies of all sizes can tap into the productivity and efficiency benefits offered by digitalisation.

Markus Brettschneider

The digital food plant

While equipment and robotics have been the key drivers of plant improvement in past decades, the rise of the industrial internet of things (IIoT) has placed greater importance on software and insight. In particular, many plant managers now use digital solutions to monitor the status of equipment to mitigate performance problems.

For example, most food processing plants will have automated at least one part of the production line with a conveyor system. As with any piece of equipment, parts of this system will gradually wear down from repeated use over time. For critical components such as the motor, this leads to a slow decline in performance and risks downtime due to breakage.

Plant managers must therefore undertake predictive maintenance to address any issues before they become problems. To do this effectively, plant managers must have accurate performance data from the conveyor’s low-voltage motors.

Rather than invest in new systems that feature IIoT functionality, businesses can install multi-function sensors to collect and analyse performance data.

For example, the ABB Ability Smart Sensor for motors allows engineers to digitalise food production plants with minimal expenditure. These sensors fit directly onto the motor’s frame and monitor key performance factors such as temperature and vibration. This data is transmitted to the cloud, where it is analysed and reports are generated for plant engineers.

What the data provides is new insight into the health of motors used in production, enabling a shift from reactive maintenance to predictive maintenance. With a simple “stop light” system of green, yellow and red lights, fleet motor status is simple to assess.

Just as cellphones are no longer exclusive to the likes of CEOs of listed companies, digitalisation is not reserved for large food […]

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Digitalisation-not just for big business

By Zenobia Hegde

When cellphones were first released in the mid-1980s, a handset would set you back $4000 (€3378.98) — the equivalent of almost $10,000 (€8447.45) today. Here, Markus Brettschneider, group senior vice president and general manager for global food & beverage applications for ABB, explains how smaller food manufacturers can take advantage of low-cost digital technology.

When the first cellphone was released in 1983, this breakthrough technology was reserved for high-ranking business people and the social elite. Yet, decreasing technological costs have led to cellphones becoming arguably the most common technology available today. In fact, the UN’s 2014 telecommunications figures revealed that there are almost as many cellphone subscriptions as there are people on Earth.

This is indicative of a technological trend known as quality-adjusted price, which ties closely into the concept of Moore’s law. As technology rapidly develops at a pace that leads to significant performance increases year on year, the cost of that technology decreases at a similar pace.

This presents an important opportunity for smaller businesses to take advantage of newer technologies that were previously only accessible to large companies. In the food production industry, for example, there has been a significant increase in the adoption of digital technologies and software among larger businesses.Yet, food manufacturing companies of all sizes can tap into the productivity and efficiency benefits offered by digitalisation.

Markus Brettschneider

The digital food plant

While equipment and robotics have been the key drivers of plant improvement in past decades, the rise of the industrial internet of things (IIoT) has placed greater importance on software and insight. In particular, many plant managers now use digital solutions to monitor the status of equipment to mitigate performance problems.

For example, most food processing plants will have automated at least one part of the production line with a conveyor system. As with any piece of equipment, parts of this system will gradually wear down from repeated use over time. For critical components such as the motor, this leads to a slow decline in performance and risks downtime due to breakage.

Plant managers must therefore undertake predictive maintenance to address any issues before they become problems. To do this effectively, plant managers must have accurate performance data from the conveyor’s low-voltage motors.

Rather than invest in new systems that feature IIoT functionality, businesses can install multi-function sensors to collect and analyse performance data.

For example, the ABB Ability Smart Sensor for motors allows engineers to digitalise food production plants with minimal expenditure. These sensors fit directly onto the motor’s frame and monitor key performance factors such as temperature and vibration. This data is transmitted to the cloud, where it is analysed and reports are generated for plant engineers.

What the data provides is new insight into the health of motors used in production, enabling a shift from reactive maintenance to predictive maintenance. With a simple “stop light” system of green, yellow and red lights, fleet motor status is simple to assess.

Just as cellphones are no longer exclusive to the likes of CEOs of listed companies, digitalisation is not reserved for large food […]

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Cyber threats are still being ‘brushed aside’ even after WannaCry and NotPetya, says AlienVault global survey

By Zenobia Hegde

Just 16% of IT security professionals believe that their bosses and company boards have taken a greater interest in their roles as a result of the WannaCry and NotPetya cyber-attacks of 2017. This is according to new research conducted by Unified Security Management and crowd-sourced threat intelligence specialist, AlienVault.

The research, which surveyed 233 IT professionals globally about how their roles have changed following these high-profile attacks, found that just 14% have had their budgets for cyber security increased, and only a fifth (20%) have been able to implement changes or projects that were previously put on hold.

Risks grow yet budgets fall

The findings follow a separate research report from PwC which found that UK businesses have cut their cyber security budgets by a third, compared to the same point last year.

As Javvad Malik, security advocate at AlienVault, explains: “WannaCry and NotPetya are generally believed to have marked a turning point in cyber awareness, but the reality on the ground paints a different picture. Destructive malware poses existential threats to companies across all industries and can no longer be ignored. To improve our cyber resilience, corporate strategy needs to be developed that covers how to plan for, detect, mitigate and recover from such destructive attacks.”

Increased workloads

Worryingly, 13% of IT professionals whose organisations were affected by WannaCry or NotPetya felt that they were blamed for their organisations falling victim. As a result, many IT teams have worked hard to strengthen their organisation’s cyber security in the wake of these attacks.

Two-thirds (66%) are more up-to-date with patching than they were previously, and half (50%) say that they are now using threat intelligence more regularly, to stay ahead of emerging threats. In addition, 58% carried out a review of their organisation’s cyber security posture following the attacks.

Javvad Malik continues, “Working life has become much more difficult for many IT professionals in the wake of these attacks. But the preventative measures that many are engaged in, such as patching and security reviews, points towards a panicked reaction from management tiers. Given the unpredictable nature of today’s security environment, organisations should focus their efforts on detection and response.”

Changing perceptions

The research also explored whether IT professionals have noticed any changes in the way others treat them, following the high volumes of media attention around WannaCry and NotPetya. Almost a quarter (23%) reported that their family and friends are more interested now in hearing about their work. In addition, 28% believe that most people in their organisations listen to their IT advice more than they did before.

However, despite the widely reported IT security skills shortage, just 10% of those surveyed have experienced an increase in job offers, or managed to negotiate a pay increase, following the attacks.

Javvad Malik adds, “The IT security profession remains a very tough place to work, where resilience is the key to success – particularly if you are blamed in the event of your company suffering a security incident.”

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Cyber threats are still being ‘brushed aside’ even after WannaCry and NotPetya, says AlienVault global survey appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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Cyber threats are still being ‘brushed aside’ even after WannaCry and NotPetya, says AlienVault global survey

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hegde

Just 16% of IT security professionals believe that their bosses and company boards have taken a greater interest in their roles as a result of the WannaCry and NotPetya cyber-attacks of 2017. This is according to new research conducted by Unified Security Management and crowd-sourced threat intelligence specialist, AlienVault.

The research, which surveyed 233 IT professionals globally about how their roles have changed following these high-profile attacks, found that just 14% have had their budgets for cyber security increased, and only a fifth (20%) have been able to implement changes or projects that were previously put on hold.

Risks grow yet budgets fall

The findings follow a separate research report from PwC which found that UK businesses have cut their cyber security budgets by a third, compared to the same point last year.

As Javvad Malik, security advocate at AlienVault, explains: “WannaCry and NotPetya are generally believed to have marked a turning point in cyber awareness, but the reality on the ground paints a different picture. Destructive malware poses existential threats to companies across all industries and can no longer be ignored. To improve our cyber resilience, corporate strategy needs to be developed that covers how to plan for, detect, mitigate and recover from such destructive attacks.”

Increased workloads

Worryingly, 13% of IT professionals whose organisations were affected by WannaCry or NotPetya felt that they were blamed for their organisations falling victim. As a result, many IT teams have worked hard to strengthen their organisation’s cyber security in the wake of these attacks.

Two-thirds (66%) are more up-to-date with patching than they were previously, and half (50%) say that they are now using threat intelligence more regularly, to stay ahead of emerging threats. In addition, 58% carried out a review of their organisation’s cyber security posture following the attacks.

Javvad Malik continues, “Working life has become much more difficult for many IT professionals in the wake of these attacks. But the preventative measures that many are engaged in, such as patching and security reviews, points towards a panicked reaction from management tiers. Given the unpredictable nature of today’s security environment, organisations should focus their efforts on detection and response.”

Changing perceptions

The research also explored whether IT professionals have noticed any changes in the way others treat them, following the high volumes of media attention around WannaCry and NotPetya. Almost a quarter (23%) reported that their family and friends are more interested now in hearing about their work. In addition, 28% believe that most people in their organisations listen to their IT advice more than they did before.

However, despite the widely reported IT security skills shortage, just 10% of those surveyed have experienced an increase in job offers, or managed to negotiate a pay increase, following the attacks.

Javvad Malik adds, “The IT security profession remains a very tough place to work, where resilience is the key to success – particularly if you are blamed in the event of your company suffering a security incident.”

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Cyber threats are still being ‘brushed aside’ even after WannaCry and NotPetya, says AlienVault global survey appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post Cyber threats are still being ‘brushed aside’ even after WannaCry and NotPetya, says AlienVault global survey appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

IDG Contributor Network: Refactoring the network

By Erik Fritzler

The fundamental shift of the enterprise toward the cloud has posed a conundrum for many. The largest issue is the state of most enterprise networks. These networks were designed for an era gone by. Their original designs could not foresee the coming of technologies such as SDN, SDWAN, Segment Routing, the Cloud and an exponential increase in bandwidth that have all happened over the past 10 years.

The IPv4 Internet BGP routing table alone has experienced a 10% year over year growth between 2009 and 2017 along. In 2009 the table eclipsed 286,000 routes. Here in 2017 we are at approximately 650,000. These figures only account for IPv4 routes, and not the full IPv4 and IPv6 tables. During that same period we have gone from token ring and 10Base-T to 100GbE.

To read this article in full, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

IDG Contributor Network: Refactoring the network

By News Aggregator

By Erik Fritzler

The fundamental shift of the enterprise toward the cloud has posed a conundrum for many. The largest issue is the state of most enterprise networks. These networks were designed for an era gone by. Their original designs could not foresee the coming of technologies such as SDN, SDWAN, Segment Routing, the Cloud and an exponential increase in bandwidth that have all happened over the past 10 years.

The IPv4 Internet BGP routing table alone has experienced a 10% year over year growth between 2009 and 2017 along. In 2009 the table eclipsed 286,000 routes. Here in 2017 we are at approximately 650,000. These figures only account for IPv4 routes, and not the full IPv4 and IPv6 tables. During that same period we have gone from token ring and 10Base-T to 100GbE.

To read this article in full, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

The post IDG Contributor Network: Refactoring the network appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Orange Belgium’s new IoT network claims 100% coverage to support massive Internet of Things solutions

By Zenobia Hegde

The possibilities offered by the Internet of Things (IoT) are growing strongly in Belgium and throughout the world. Orange Belgium decided last year to invest in new IoT technologies based on international standards, and has now announced the availability of Narrow Band-IoT (NB-IoT) and LTE-M technologies, so called “Mobile IoT”, across the whole Belgian territory, reaching nationwide coverage both indoors and outdoors.

The NB-IoT and LTE-M technologies are Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) cellular network layers that will allow millions of everyday objects to be connected to the Internet of Things (IoT). LPWA technologies offer many advantages when connecting objects to the Internet of Things, such as extending the battery life of the connected equipment by up to 10 years thanks to low energy consumption, or drastically reducing the cost of the radio modules inside the devices that need to be connected. Smart furniture, smart parking and asset tracking for instance become possible.

Orange turns Belgium into a mobile IoT test lab

The Mobile IoT technologies bring a different approach to LPWA technologies. Apart from extended battery life and the minimal cost of radio modules, NB-IoT and LTE-M is also said to enable:

Full bidirectional communication between the object and the network allowing firmware software updates over the air;

The best possible mobile coverage (up to +20dB compared to 2G/4G coverage), considerably improving signal penetration inside buildings;
Guaranteed connectivity abroad (roaming) on other operators’ mobile IoT networks;
And the safest solution for IoT connectivity as it operates in licensed spectrum. Moreover, says Orange, the SIM card offers secure connections thanks to LTE networks’ unique capabilities in terms of authenticating and encrypting the data in transit.

Gabriel Flichy, chief technology officer of Orange Belgium, explains: “The choice for Mobile IoT technologies is future-proof as it is fully consistent with the future evolution towards 5G. It will then be possible to connect objects that require very high reliability e.g. for the remote control of critical devices and automation processes.”

“Today we are already using our Mobile IoT network together with the Flemish government for a project with connected bikes in collaboration with our partners Huawei and Sensinxs; IMEC is testing a smart plug project as part of Antwerp’s City of Things program and we have teamed up with CommuniThings for smart parking solutions. We invite all application developers, system integrators and early adopters to test the advantages of Orange Mobile IoT network.”

Overall Mobile IoT will act as the catalyst for companies to establish connections that would not have been viable with existing technologies. Consumers will see a huge variety of new products, services and applications enabled by Mobile IoT.

For more information click here.

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Orange Belgium’s new IoT network claims 100% coverage to support massive Internet of Things solutions appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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Orange Belgium’s new IoT network claims 100% coverage to support massive Internet of Things solutions

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hegde

The possibilities offered by the Internet of Things (IoT) are growing strongly in Belgium and throughout the world. Orange Belgium decided last year to invest in new IoT technologies based on international standards, and has now announced the availability of Narrow Band-IoT (NB-IoT) and LTE-M technologies, so called “Mobile IoT”, across the whole Belgian territory, reaching nationwide coverage both indoors and outdoors.

The NB-IoT and LTE-M technologies are Low Power Wide Area (LPWA) cellular network layers that will allow millions of everyday objects to be connected to the Internet of Things (IoT). LPWA technologies offer many advantages when connecting objects to the Internet of Things, such as extending the battery life of the connected equipment by up to 10 years thanks to low energy consumption, or drastically reducing the cost of the radio modules inside the devices that need to be connected. Smart furniture, smart parking and asset tracking for instance become possible.

Orange turns Belgium into a mobile IoT test lab

The Mobile IoT technologies bring a different approach to LPWA technologies. Apart from extended battery life and the minimal cost of radio modules, NB-IoT and LTE-M is also said to enable:

Full bidirectional communication between the object and the network allowing firmware software updates over the air;

The best possible mobile coverage (up to +20dB compared to 2G/4G coverage), considerably improving signal penetration inside buildings;
Guaranteed connectivity abroad (roaming) on other operators’ mobile IoT networks;
And the safest solution for IoT connectivity as it operates in licensed spectrum. Moreover, says Orange, the SIM card offers secure connections thanks to LTE networks’ unique capabilities in terms of authenticating and encrypting the data in transit.

Gabriel Flichy, chief technology officer of Orange Belgium, explains: “The choice for Mobile IoT technologies is future-proof as it is fully consistent with the future evolution towards 5G. It will then be possible to connect objects that require very high reliability e.g. for the remote control of critical devices and automation processes.”

“Today we are already using our Mobile IoT network together with the Flemish government for a project with connected bikes in collaboration with our partners Huawei and Sensinxs; IMEC is testing a smart plug project as part of Antwerp’s City of Things program and we have teamed up with CommuniThings for smart parking solutions. We invite all application developers, system integrators and early adopters to test the advantages of Orange Mobile IoT network.”

Overall Mobile IoT will act as the catalyst for companies to establish connections that would not have been viable with existing technologies. Consumers will see a huge variety of new products, services and applications enabled by Mobile IoT.

For more information click here.

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Orange Belgium’s new IoT network claims 100% coverage to support massive Internet of Things solutions appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post Orange Belgium’s new IoT network claims 100% coverage to support massive Internet of Things solutions appeared on IPv6.net.

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Gemalto eSIM technology enables always connected experience for new Microsoft Surface Pro with LTE Advanced

By Zenobia Hegde

Gemalto, the provider in digital security, is supplying the eSIM (embedded SIM) solution for Microsoft’s Surface Pro with LTE Advanced, the most connected laptop in its class which will begin shipping to business customers in December 2017. Gemalto’s partnership with Microsoft enabled Surface to become the first fully integrated embedded SIM PC in the Windows ecosystem.

Gemalto’s advanced technology supports seamless activation of mobile subscriptions for users of the innovative Surface Pro with LTE Advanced. This smooth experience leverages Gemalto’s remote subscription management solution in conjunction with Windows 10. Surface customers expect their products to deliver advanced technology and with Gemalto’s eSIM solution, all possible connectivity options are available out-of-box, including the purchase of cellular data from the device itself.

Compliant with the GSMA Remote SIM Provisioning specifications, Gemalto’s eSIM solution is fully integrated with Windows 10. This integration enables the Gemalto solution to have a complete servicing model so that patching and lifecycle management features are available as the technology and standards evolve over time. This capability extends the value promise of Surface as new experiences and capabilities will be available to today’s purchasers of the Surface Pro with LTE Advanced.

“The Surface Pro has redefined the laptop category,” said Paul Bischof, director, Devices Program Management at Microsoft. “Gemalto’s eSIM solution is helping us to materialise our vision of an uncompromised customer experience.”

“Adoption of eSIM technology is growing rapidly. Mobile operators recognise the potential of seamless connectivity and increased convenience as a way of expanding their customer reach to additional devices” said Frédéric Vasnier, executive vice president Mobile Service and IoT for Gemalto. “We are at the beginning of a significant technology transformation and the Surface Pro with LTE Advanced represents the start.”

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Gemalto eSIM technology enables always connected experience for new Microsoft Surface Pro with LTE Advanced appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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Gemalto eSIM technology enables always connected experience for new Microsoft Surface Pro with LTE Advanced

By News Aggregator

By Zenobia Hegde

Gemalto, the provider in digital security, is supplying the eSIM (embedded SIM) solution for Microsoft’s Surface Pro with LTE Advanced, the most connected laptop in its class which will begin shipping to business customers in December 2017. Gemalto’s partnership with Microsoft enabled Surface to become the first fully integrated embedded SIM PC in the Windows ecosystem.

Gemalto’s advanced technology supports seamless activation of mobile subscriptions for users of the innovative Surface Pro with LTE Advanced. This smooth experience leverages Gemalto’s remote subscription management solution in conjunction with Windows 10. Surface customers expect their products to deliver advanced technology and with Gemalto’s eSIM solution, all possible connectivity options are available out-of-box, including the purchase of cellular data from the device itself.

Compliant with the GSMA Remote SIM Provisioning specifications, Gemalto’s eSIM solution is fully integrated with Windows 10. This integration enables the Gemalto solution to have a complete servicing model so that patching and lifecycle management features are available as the technology and standards evolve over time. This capability extends the value promise of Surface as new experiences and capabilities will be available to today’s purchasers of the Surface Pro with LTE Advanced.

“The Surface Pro has redefined the laptop category,” said Paul Bischof, director, Devices Program Management at Microsoft. “Gemalto’s eSIM solution is helping us to materialise our vision of an uncompromised customer experience.”

“Adoption of eSIM technology is growing rapidly. Mobile operators recognise the potential of seamless connectivity and increased convenience as a way of expanding their customer reach to additional devices” said Frédéric Vasnier, executive vice president Mobile Service and IoT for Gemalto. “We are at the beginning of a significant technology transformation and the Surface Pro with LTE Advanced represents the start.”

Comment on this article below or via Twitter: @IoTNow_OR @jcIoTnow

The post Gemalto eSIM technology enables always connected experience for new Microsoft Surface Pro with LTE Advanced appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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