internet stream protocol

End-to-end IoT platform Particle banks $20M Series B

Particle, an end-to-end enterprise IoT platform has raised $20 Million in Series B Funding. Spark Capital led the round.

Particle is a full-stack IoT device platform.

The company entered into the IoT platform market as a hardware connectivity solution deploying its platform in a wide variety of industrial and municipal IoT applications, such as in gas stations, on oil rigs, in storm water drains, and in manufacturing equipment.

However, it has evolved into a full-stack suite having the hardware, firmware, software and the Particle cloud. An appealing tagline “prototype-to-production platform for developing an Internet of Things product” and an equally robust product has helped Particle’s growth. 120,000 people and companies, 50% of which are from S&P 500, currently use it to develop their IoT products.

“While the media’s IoT focus has been primarily on consumer electronics, wearables, and ‘smart home’, we’ve learned from our customers that the future of IoT is within the enterprise market,” said Zach Supalla, CEO at Particle.

Forbes estimated that more than 450 IoT companies have mushroomed in the past two years and 25% of the IoT companies founded in 2016 closed their shop. Particle’s growth and traction were noteworthy compared to other IoT products.

Particle full-stack platform has a cloud offering, device management console, cellular IoT SIMs, SDKs and IDE (integrated development environment). The hardware components it sells include Wi-Fi connected microcontrollers, internet buttons, and asset tracking hardware kits.

The company has been consistently raising funds throughout its five years journey. It raised $567,000 of crowd-funding in 2013 followed by a Seed Round of $4.2M in July 2014 and $10.4M Series A from Root Ventures, O’Reilly Alpha Tech Ventures (OATV), and Rincon Venture Partners in Nov 2016.

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End-to-end IoT platform Particle banks $20M Series B

By News Aggregator

Particle, an end-to-end enterprise IoT platform has raised $20 Million in Series B Funding. Spark Capital led the round.

Particle is a full-stack IoT device platform.

The company entered into the IoT platform market as a hardware connectivity solution deploying its platform in a wide variety of industrial and municipal IoT applications, such as in gas stations, on oil rigs, in storm water drains, and in manufacturing equipment.

However, it has evolved into a full-stack suite having the hardware, firmware, software and the Particle cloud. An appealing tagline “prototype-to-production platform for developing an Internet of Things product” and an equally robust product has helped Particle’s growth. 120,000 people and companies, 50% of which are from S&P 500, currently use it to develop their IoT products.

“While the media’s IoT focus has been primarily on consumer electronics, wearables, and ‘smart home’, we’ve learned from our customers that the future of IoT is within the enterprise market,” said Zach Supalla, CEO at Particle.

Forbes estimated that more than 450 IoT companies have mushroomed in the past two years and 25% of the IoT companies founded in 2016 closed their shop. Particle’s growth and traction were noteworthy compared to other IoT products.

Particle full-stack platform has a cloud offering, device management console, cellular IoT SIMs, SDKs and IDE (integrated development environment). The hardware components it sells include Wi-Fi connected microcontrollers, internet buttons, and asset tracking hardware kits.

The company has been consistently raising funds throughout its five years journey. It raised $567,000 of crowd-funding in 2013 followed by a Seed Round of $4.2M in July 2014 and $10.4M Series A from Root Ventures, O’Reilly Alpha Tech Ventures (OATV), and Rincon Venture Partners in Nov 2016.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/iot

The post End-to-end IoT platform Particle banks $20M Series B appeared on IPv6.net.

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Checklist for Getting a Grip on DDOS Attacks and the Botnet Army

By Industry Perspectives

Heitor Faroni is Director of Solutions Marketing for Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise.

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks jumped into the mainstream consciousness last year after several high-profile cases – one of the largest and most widely reported being the Dyn takedown in Fall 2016, an interesting example as it used poorly secured IoT devices to coordinate the attack. While not necessarily a new threat, they have in fact been around since the late ’90s.

When you consider that Gartner predicts that by 2020 it is predicted there will be 20 billion connected devices as part of the growing Internet of Things, the need to implement the right network procedures and tools to properly secure all these devices is only going to grow.

The New Battleground – Rent-a-bots on the Rise

Put simply, DDoS attacks occur when an attacker attempts to make a network resource unavailable to legitimate users by flooding the targeted network with superfluous traffic until it simply overwhelms the servers and knocks the service offline. Thousands and thousands of these attacks happen every year, and are increasing both in number and in scale. According to some reports, 2016 saw a 138 percent year-over-year increase in the total number of attacks greater than 100Gbps.

The Dyn attack used the Mirai botnet which exploits poorly secured, IP-enabled “smart things” to swell its ranks of infected devices. It is programmed to scan for IoT devices that are still only protected by factory-set defaults or hard-coded usernames and passwords. Once infected, the device becomes a member of a botnet of tens of thousands of IoT devices, which can then bombard a selected target with malicious traffic.

This botnet and others are available for hire online from enterprising cybercriminals; and as their functionalities and capabilities are expanded and refined, more and more connected devices will be at risk.

So what steps can businesses take to protect themselves now and in the in the future?

First: Contain the Threat

With the rise of IoT at the heart of digital business transformation and its power as an agent for leveraging some of the most important technological advances – such as big data, automation, machine learning and enterprise-wide visibility – new ways of managing networks and their web of connected devices are rushing to keep pace.

A key development is IoT containment. This is a method of creating virtual isolated environments using network virtualization techniques. The idea is to group connected devices with a specific functional purpose, and the respective authorized users into a unique IoT container. You still have all users and devices in a corporation physically connected to a single converged network infrastructure, but they are logically isolated by these containers.

Say, for example, the security team has 10 IP-surveillance cameras at a facility. By creating an IoT container for the security team’s network, IT staff can create a virtual, isolated network which cannot be accessed by unauthorized personnel – or be seen by other devices outside the virtual environment. If any part of the network outside of this environment is compromised, it will not spread to the surveillance network. This can be replicated for payroll systems, R&D or any other team within the business.

By creating a virtual IoT environment you can also ensure the right conditions for a group of devices to operate properly. Within a container, quality of service (QoS) rules can be enforced, and it is possible to reserve or limit bandwidth, prioritize mission critical traffic and block undesired applications. For instance, the surveillance cameras that run a continuous feed may require a reserved amount of bandwidth, whereas critical-care machines in hospital units must get the highest priority. This QoS enforcement can be better accomplished by using switches enabled with deep-packet inspection, which see the packets traversing the network as well as what applications are in use – so you know if someone is accessing the CRM system, security feeds or simply watching Netflix.

Second: Protection at the Switch

Businesses should ensure that switch vendors are taking the threat seriously and putting in place procedures to maximize hardware protection. A good approach can be summed up in a three-pronged strategy.

  • A second pair of eyes – make sure the switch operating system is verified by third-party security experts. Some companies may shy away from sharing source code to be verified by industry specialists, but it is important to look at manufacturers that have ongoing relationships with leading industry security experts.
  • Scrambled code means one switch can’t compromise the whole network. The use of open source code as part of operating systems is common in the industry, which does come with some risk as the code is “common knowledge”. By scrambling object code within the switch’s memory, even if a hacker could locate sections of open source code in one switch each would be scrambled uniquely, so the same attack would not work on multiple switches.
  • How is the switch operating system delivered? The IT industry has a global supply chain, with component manufacturing, assembly, shipping and distribution having a worldwide footprint. This introduces the risk of the switch being tampered with before it gets to the end-customer. The network installation team should always download the official operating systems to the switch directly from the vendor’s secure servers before installation.

Third: Do the Simple Things to Secure Your Smart Things

As well as establishing a more secure core network, there are precautions you can take right now to enhance device protection. It is amazing how many businesses miss out these simple steps.

  • Change the default password One very simple and often overlooked procedure is changing the default password. In the Dyn case, the virus searched for default settings of the IP devices to take control.
  • Update the software As the battle between cybercriminals and security experts continues, the need to stay up-to-the-minute with the latest updates and security patches becomes more important. Pay attention to the latest updates and make it part of the routine to stay on top.
  • Prevent remote management Disable the remote management protocol, such as telnet or http, that provide control from another location. The recommended remote management secure protocols are via SSH or https.

Evolve Your Network

The Internet of Things has great transformative potential for businesses in all industries, from manufacturing and healthcare to transportation and education. But with any new wave of technical innovation comes new challenges. We are at the beginning of the IoT era, which is why it’s important to get the fundamental network requirements in place to support not only the increase in data traversing our networks, but enforcing QoS rules and minimizing risk from cyberattacks.

Opinions expressed in the article above do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Data Center Knowledge and Penton.

Industry Perspectives is a content channel at Data Center Knowledge highlighting thought leadership in the data center arena. See our guidelines and submission process for information on participating. View previously published Industry Perspectives in our Knowledge Library.

Read more here:: datacenterknowledge.com/feed/

Checklist for Getting a Grip on DDOS Attacks and the Botnet Army

By News Aggregator

By Industry Perspectives

Heitor Faroni is Director of Solutions Marketing for Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise.

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks jumped into the mainstream consciousness last year after several high-profile cases – one of the largest and most widely reported being the Dyn takedown in Fall 2016, an interesting example as it used poorly secured IoT devices to coordinate the attack. While not necessarily a new threat, they have in fact been around since the late ’90s.

When you consider that Gartner predicts that by 2020 it is predicted there will be 20 billion connected devices as part of the growing Internet of Things, the need to implement the right network procedures and tools to properly secure all these devices is only going to grow.

The New Battleground – Rent-a-bots on the Rise

Put simply, DDoS attacks occur when an attacker attempts to make a network resource unavailable to legitimate users by flooding the targeted network with superfluous traffic until it simply overwhelms the servers and knocks the service offline. Thousands and thousands of these attacks happen every year, and are increasing both in number and in scale. According to some reports, 2016 saw a 138 percent year-over-year increase in the total number of attacks greater than 100Gbps.

The Dyn attack used the Mirai botnet which exploits poorly secured, IP-enabled “smart things” to swell its ranks of infected devices. It is programmed to scan for IoT devices that are still only protected by factory-set defaults or hard-coded usernames and passwords. Once infected, the device becomes a member of a botnet of tens of thousands of IoT devices, which can then bombard a selected target with malicious traffic.

This botnet and others are available for hire online from enterprising cybercriminals; and as their functionalities and capabilities are expanded and refined, more and more connected devices will be at risk.

So what steps can businesses take to protect themselves now and in the in the future?

First: Contain the Threat

With the rise of IoT at the heart of digital business transformation and its power as an agent for leveraging some of the most important technological advances – such as big data, automation, machine learning and enterprise-wide visibility – new ways of managing networks and their web of connected devices are rushing to keep pace.

A key development is IoT containment. This is a method of creating virtual isolated environments using network virtualization techniques. The idea is to group connected devices with a specific functional purpose, and the respective authorized users into a unique IoT container. You still have all users and devices in a corporation physically connected to a single converged network infrastructure, but they are logically isolated by these containers.

Say, for example, the security team has 10 IP-surveillance cameras at a facility. By creating an IoT container for the security team’s network, IT staff can create a virtual, isolated network which cannot be accessed by unauthorized personnel – or be seen by other devices outside the virtual environment. If any part of the network outside of this environment is compromised, it will not spread to the surveillance network. This can be replicated for payroll systems, R&D or any other team within the business.

By creating a virtual IoT environment you can also ensure the right conditions for a group of devices to operate properly. Within a container, quality of service (QoS) rules can be enforced, and it is possible to reserve or limit bandwidth, prioritize mission critical traffic and block undesired applications. For instance, the surveillance cameras that run a continuous feed may require a reserved amount of bandwidth, whereas critical-care machines in hospital units must get the highest priority. This QoS enforcement can be better accomplished by using switches enabled with deep-packet inspection, which see the packets traversing the network as well as what applications are in use – so you know if someone is accessing the CRM system, security feeds or simply watching Netflix.

Second: Protection at the Switch

Businesses should ensure that switch vendors are taking the threat seriously and putting in place procedures to maximize hardware protection. A good approach can be summed up in a three-pronged strategy.

  • A second pair of eyes – make sure the switch operating system is verified by third-party security experts. Some companies may shy away from sharing source code to be verified by industry specialists, but it is important to look at manufacturers that have ongoing relationships with leading industry security experts.
  • Scrambled code means one switch can’t compromise the whole network. The use of open source code as part of operating systems is common in the industry, which does come with some risk as the code is “common knowledge”. By scrambling object code within the switch’s memory, even if a hacker could locate sections of open source code in one switch each would be scrambled uniquely, so the same attack would not work on multiple switches.
  • How is the switch operating system delivered? The IT industry has a global supply chain, with component manufacturing, assembly, shipping and distribution having a worldwide footprint. This introduces the risk of the switch being tampered with before it gets to the end-customer. The network installation team should always download the official operating systems to the switch directly from the vendor’s secure servers before installation.

Third: Do the Simple Things to Secure Your Smart Things

As well as establishing a more secure core network, there are precautions you can take right now to enhance device protection. It is amazing how many businesses miss out these simple steps.

  • Change the default password One very simple and often overlooked procedure is changing the default password. In the Dyn case, the virus searched for default settings of the IP devices to take control.
  • Update the software As the battle between cybercriminals and security experts continues, the need to stay up-to-the-minute with the latest updates and security patches becomes more important. Pay attention to the latest updates and make it part of the routine to stay on top.
  • Prevent remote management Disable the remote management protocol, such as telnet or http, that provide control from another location. The recommended remote management secure protocols are via SSH or https.

Evolve Your Network

The Internet of Things has great transformative potential for businesses in all industries, from manufacturing and healthcare to transportation and education. But with any new wave of technical innovation comes new challenges. We are at the beginning of the IoT era, which is why it’s important to get the fundamental network requirements in place to support not only the increase in data traversing our networks, but enforcing QoS rules and minimizing risk from cyberattacks.

Opinions expressed in the article above do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Data Center Knowledge and Penton.

Industry Perspectives is a content channel at Data Center Knowledge highlighting thought leadership in the data center arena. See our guidelines and submission process for information on participating. View previously published Industry Perspectives in our Knowledge Library.

Read more here:: datacenterknowledge.com/feed/

The post Checklist for Getting a Grip on DDOS Attacks and the Botnet Army appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Could your IoT solution survive on Silk Road 4.0? Submit your ideas now

By News Aggregator

By Jeremy Cowan

Regular readers will remember our exclusive article on the madcap, multinational, multilingual scheme to ride deep into the heart of China along the old Silk Road. (See: Two motorcycles, 10,000 km along Silk Road 4.0, the Internet of Things … and you?) Well, now it’s getting serious, says Jeremy Cowan. And what’s more, it’s time […]

The post Could your IoT solution survive on Silk Road 4.0? Submit your ideas now appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post Could your IoT solution survive on Silk Road 4.0? Submit your ideas now appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Could your IoT solution survive on Silk Road 4.0? Submit your ideas now

By Jeremy Cowan

Regular readers will remember our exclusive article on the madcap, multinational, multilingual scheme to ride deep into the heart of China along the old Silk Road. (See: Two motorcycles, 10,000 km along Silk Road 4.0, the Internet of Things … and you?) Well, now it’s getting serious, says Jeremy Cowan. And what’s more, it’s time […]

The post Could your IoT solution survive on Silk Road 4.0? Submit your ideas now appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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10 Benefits of Analyzing Data at the Edge in an IoT Environment

There is a tremendous amount of data being generated at the sources in IoT environments. eWEEK offers 10 reasons why real-time analytics at the data source is critical.

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AgilePoint to Attend Microsoft Inspire 2017

Low-code leader to highlight AI and IoT readiness and ability to create apps, forms, and workflows that will run on any version of SharePoint and Salesforce

(PRWeb July 10, 2017)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/07/prweb14491570.htm

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TensorFlow to Hadoop By Way of Datameer

By Alex Woodie

Companies that want to use TensorFlow to execute deep learning models on big data stored in Hadoop may want to check out the new SmartAI offering unveiled by Datameer today.

Deep learning has emerged as one of the hottest technique for turning massive sets of unstructured data into useful information, and Google‘s Tensorflow is arguably the most popular programming and runtime framework for enabling it. So it made sense that Datameer, which was one of the first vendors to develop a soup-to-nuts Hadoop application for big data anatlyics, has now added support for TensorFlow into its Hadoop-based application.

With today’s unveiling of SmartAI, Datameer is providing a way to execute and operationalize TensorFlow models. “The objective here is to take the stuff that mad scientists are coming up with, and actually take it to the business,” Datameer’s Senior Director of Product Marketing John Morrell tells Datanami.

SmartAI, which is still in technical preview, is not helping data scientists to create the models. They will still do that in their favorite coding environment. Nor is it set up to train the models. If you’re interested in learning about how that can be accomplished on Hadoop, Hortonworks has a good blog post on integrating TensorFlow assemblies into YARN.

Rather, Datameer’s new app is all about solving some of the thorny “last mile” problems that organizations often encounter as they’re moving a trained TensorFlow model from the lab into production.

“AI today has had some problems in terms of operationalization,” Morrell says. “When a data scientist come up with a formula using their data science tools, they just chuck it over the wall to IT guy, who then tries to turn it into code, and custom code the whole thing.”

Datameer seeks to help operationalize TensorFlow models with SmartAI

Instead of using scripts and custom coding, SmartAI aims to codify the TensorFlow work into its Hadoop application. Not only does Datameer provide a way to distribute TensorFlow algorithms to nodes in a Hadoop cluster by way of YARN, but it also hooks it into its workflow to help solve some of the thorny issues around code re-use, data governance, and security.

“It allows you to take an AI model that you created in TensorFlow, plug it into Datameer, and then Datameer can operationalize those models,” Morrell continues. “It can operationalize those insights, directly on top of your data lake, and give you all the scale and security and governance and integration with your business systems that is lacking in the data science world.”

AI is only as good as the data that feeds it, says Datameer CTO Peter Voss. “We’re thrilled to connect the dots by allowing enterprises to bring together massive amounts of disparate data, prepare and design the data pipeline, and now ultimately feed the data into models that have the potential to radically optimize business models,” he says.

Deep learning is a form of unsupervised machine learning that’s grown rapidly in popularity over the past year. The approach was initially used by Web giants like Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft to turbo-charge image recognition, voice recognition, and natural language processing (NLP) systems. This is typically done by training very large neural networks, with hundreds or thousands of layers, atop speedy GPUs processors.

As deep learning racks up the wins and demonstrates better accuracy compared to other machine learning techniques, it’s starting to branch out into the broader market. Today data scientists are looking for other ways to leverage the enormous power of this form of unstructured data analysis. In particular, organizations are examining ways to use deep learning in areas like fraud detection, recommendation systems, healthcare analytics, and analysis of time-series IoT data.

Deep learning’s main advantage lies in speed and simplicity. Many data scientists are looking to use TensorFlow to replace models originally developed with Spark’s MLlib, as TensorFlow can be an order of magnitude faster than Spark, Morrell says, “You can train things about four to 100 times faster and you can put together model with 10 to 12 lines of coding,” he says.

One of the great things about AI and deep learning in particular, Morrell adds, is that it takes feature engineering out of the equation, “because the deep learning model can automatically figure out what attributes are important,” he says. “This will dramatically speed up their cycles in terms of producing predictive types of models, and it will allow them to tackle many, many more problems.”

Datameer was one of the first vendors offering an end-to-end analytics application for Apache Hadoop that delivered many of the capabilities organizations need to operationalize their big data investments on the distributed platform. As technology evolved, so did Datameer, which added support for Apache Spark to boost the speed and provide access to more data science tools.

TensorFlow was the first deep learning framework added to Datameer’s application, but the company expects to add more frameworks over time, Morrell says.

Related Items:

Machine Learning, Deep Learning, and AI: What’s the Difference?

Why Deep Learning, and Why Now

Spark’s New Deep Learning Tricks

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Autotalks raises $40m in investments with Round D of V2X support

By Sheetal Kumbhar

Autotalks, a global provider of V2X (Vehicle to Everything) communication chipsets, has extended its recent funding round. Autotalks completed its Series D round with about $40 million in investments, an oversubscription of $10 million. The increased investment amount is a result of new investments from investors such as Mirai Creation Investment Fund, of which the […]

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