ipv4 exhaustion

Connecting with the Caribbean

By Jennifer Bly

The Caribbean is an integral part of ARIN’s service region. Our presence in the Caribbean dates back over two decades. Through outreach events and relationships with technical community members, local operator groups, government officials, regulators, and law enforcement agencies, ARIN has been a strong partner to the Caribbean’s efforts to establish and maintain a strong and resilient Internet infrastructure. We’ve hosted Public Policy and Members meetings, attended community events, provided technical expertise, and so much more.

Here are a few of the many ways we’ve been active in the Caribbean over the years:

Distributing Address Space to Caribbean Members

The first allocation/assignment of IPv4 address space to a Caribbean organization was in 1992. Today ARIN is serving 140 customers in the Caribbean, noting there are an additional 80 customers in Puerto Rico.

Hosting ARIN Meetings in the Caribbean

We hold two Public Policy and Members Meetings a year for members of the entire Internet community to engage in policy discussions, network with colleagues, and attend workshops and tutorials. Our meetings are held in varying locations across the US, Canada, and the Caribbean to allow individuals in all areas of our region to attend. These meetings have been hosted in Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Barbados and Jamaica. We also offer the opportunity to attend a meeting for free through our Fellowship Program. So far, we’ve had 30 fellows join us from the Caribbean!

Spring 2015 meeting fellows pose for a picture at ARIN 36 in Montego Bay, Jamaica

Listening to the concerns of the Caribbean community

Anyone who is interested in participating in ARIN’s public policy process that determines how Internet number resources are distributed is welcome to participate. Back in 2008, the Caribbean community involvement in the policy process resulted in a smaller minimum allocation size for the region.

Bringing ARIN on the Road Events to the Caribbean

ARIN on the Road is a day-long educational event that travels to lesser-frequented locations within our region. These events provide the latest information on our technical services, the status of IPv6 adoption, current policy discussions and updates about ARIN and the RIR system. We answer questions about how to interact with our online services and how to get involved in our policy development process. To date, we’ve hosted ARIN on the Road programs in different cities throughout the Caribbean including Dominica, St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda, with an upcoming event in Puerto Rico this summer!


ARIN on the Road Dominica participants hear from Andy Newton, ARIN Chief Engineer, on 18 June 2015

Partnering with Caribbean Operator Group, CaribNOG

We work closely with local operator groups in our region toward the shared goals of the successful operation of the Internet infrastructure. We regularly sponsor the Caribbean Network Operators Group (CaribNOG) meetings held in locations throughout the Caribbean region. Members of our engineering team frequently give presentations at CaribNOG to help support the needs of Caribbean network operators. In fact, we also played an instrumental role in the first ever CaribNOG meeting which occurred in 2010 in St. Maarten. Our CTO, Mark Kosters, along with other ARIN staff were in attendance. They gave presentations briefing the participants on ARIN and topics including RPKI, DNSSEC, IPv4 exhaustion, and IPv6.


ARIN Infrastructure Manager, Matt Rowley, presents at the 2011 CaribNOG workshop and CTU ICT Roadshow in Castries, Saint Lucia

Supporting the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU)

We’ve been a supporter of the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU) since 2007. The CTU is an inter-governmental treaty organization dedicated to facilitating the development of the regional telecommunications sector. The CTU works with Caribbean agencies in the areas of capacity building, knowledge sharing, education and policies for Internet governance within the Caribbean. ARIN provides educational information at Ministerial and CTU’s ICT Roadshows, collaborates to get the word out about ongoing ICT capacity-building efforts carried out by the CTU, and, where possible, lends resources to reach our Caribbean community.

ARIN staff, Nate Davis, Cathy Handley, John Curran, Richard Jimmerson, and Susan Hamlin welcome Bernadette Lewis, Secretary General of the CTU, to the ARIN offices

Getting involved in CANTO

The Caribbean Association of National Telecommunication Organization (CANTO) serves the Caribbean telecommunications and Internet community by influencing policy, providing information in all aspects of the industry as it evolves, and facilitating a meaningful collaborative process. Over the past decade we have consistently sponsored and sent speakers to the annual CANTO meeting and exhibited to support their efforts in the Caribbean ICT community. Earlier this month, Susan Hamlin, Director of Communication and Member Services, presented and exhibited at CANTO in the Dominican Republic.

ARIN and LACNIC host a joint booth at CANTO 2015 in Miami, Florida to discuss Internet number resources with attendees

Engaging with Governments, Regulators, and LEAs

We’ve maintained a long-standing, well-established working relationship with the governments, regulators, and law enforcement agencies (LEAs) based both within and outside of the Caribbean. This cooperative relationship has become increasingly important, as the wider Internet community strives to ensure that all voices are heard and the interests of all parties are considered. Promoting a more open dialogue between all stakeholders is vital to the open, transparent, bottom-up policy development process and ensuring the continued stability of the Internet. In our normal course of business we provide information and assistance to governments as they walk through the process of obtaining Internet number resources from ARIN.

ARIN COO, Nate Davis, addresses the CTU ICT Roadshow in September 2012 with Barbados Government Information Service CIO Sharon Lynch, CTU Secretary General, Bernadette Lewis, and Barbados ICT Minister, Senator Darcy Boyce, at the headtable

Our Commitment to the Caribbean

Phew! As you can see, we’ve already done a lot. Our goals for interacting with the Caribbean community include:

  • Establishing a well-informed community about IP Addressing
  • Opening channels of communication between the different Internet number resource policy stakeholders
  • Increasing participation in policy development
  • Developing a strong relationship with governments
  • Establishing ourselves as a trusted resource for information

We expect our partnership with the Caribbean to only increase, and we look forward to continued community participation and engagement. We are pleased to announce we created a new position within our organization, and welcome Bevil Wooding as our new Caribbean Outreach Liaison. This position will further our reach and involvement in the Caribbean.

Bevil Wooding takes to the microphone in Belize City at CaribNOG 10 in November 2015

Here is a reminder of the ways you can get involved with us:

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Need for Speed

By Cablefax Staff

The Akamai Intelligent Platform report released Wednesday shows that the global average Internet connection speed has increased 12% to 7.0 Mbps in the fourth quarter, a 26 percent increase year over year. The report—which provides insight into key global statistics such as connection speeds, broadband adoption metrics, notable Internet disruptions, IPv4 exhaustion and IPv6 implementation—also finds that DC led the US in average connection speed at 26.7 Mbps, with Idaho marking the low end of the scale, connecting to Akamai at an average of 11.9 Mbps.

The post Need for Speed appeared first on Cablefax.

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The Promise of Connectivity at CES Means Nothing Without IPv6

For a few years now, we have been promised a bright future where connected devices all communicate with each other on the Internet of Things. If this year’s CES was any indication, the consumer technology industry is just about ready to deliver on that promise with a flood of new devices and products that will transform the way we interact with technology on a fundamental level.

The future certainly looks bright, but what isn’t mentioned in the keynotes and in booth pitches on the CES show floor is that the transformative effects of the Internet of Things will never be felt as long as device manufacturers, web content developers and consumer technology interests still operate on yesterday’s Internet.

The reality of the Internet’s current evolutionary state is known to every network engineer and IT professional from the largest ISP to the smallest start-up. In late 2015, ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, announced that they had exhausted their free pool of IPv4 number resources. This was an important announcement indicating the time had finally come to look beyond IPv4 to the future. To bridge the gap left by IPv4 exhaustion, consumer tech companies, service providers and websites must switch to IPv6, which will offer a near endless supply of IP addresses for the new Internet and the connected devices that wowed the 170,000 attendees at CES.

Here’s the bottom line: IPv6 isn’t a “feature” for a new product or a talking point on a marketing brochure. IPv6 is a requirement for every connected device on the market today.

This sounds fairly clear-cut to the casual observer. Unfortunately, this isn’t how IPv6 migration has been regarded by a large percentage of the consumer technology industry that is continuing to hold the adoption of IPv6 at arm’s length. That’s a problem that must be addressed before the IoT takes off and that’s why ARIN decided to take the IPv6 message right to the audiences that matter at CES.

Working with our contacts at the Consumer Technology Association, ARIN scheduled a pre-show panel discussion for Tuesday January 5th on IPv6 titled “Your Customers are on the New Internet. Are You?” On the panel were some of the best engineers working on IPv6 deployment today. The all-star line-up was anchored by ARIN’s president and CEO, John Curran, and included Paul Saab from Facebook, John Brzozowski from Comcast, Samir Vaidya from Verizon Wireless and Limor Schafman, from TIA. Moderating the panel was CTA’s own Brian Markwalter.

The room in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center was standing room only and ready to hear some compelling information on the Internet’s move to IPv6. Maybe there is some hope after all that the big guns in consumer tech finally “get it.”

Each of the panelists offered a good deal of data and statistics to support their call for IPv6 migration, but one of the standouts was one fact presented by Facebook’s Paul Saab. It’s this:

The normal router found in the average home has the capacity to connect to about 50 devices with IPv4.That same router with IPv6 could connect every single device known to man.

Imagine that for a moment — one router with enough capacity to connect a near endless stream of devices with IPv6. This is the key that will unlock an entire ecosystem of devices for the IoT and sustain the estimated 50 billion connected devices that Cisco estimates will be on the market by 2020.

Here are some other key takeaways from the panel:

  • IPv4 has exhausted and for the Internet to evolve, companies, products manufacturers and web hosting companies can either advance to IPv6 or stay in the past. In other words, if you aren’t moving to IPv6, your competitors are.
  • Comcast estimates that 97 percent of devices it sees are managed using only IPv6.
  • IPv6 is the connection method of choice for Facebook, with over 10 percent of the world’s users connecting to the service over IPv6.
  • Facebook also sees faster connections over IPv6 compared to IPv4, offering users the opportunity to connect to their content faster over rival services.
  • Comcast has deployed IPv6 100 percent across its network and its next generation of the X1 Entertainment OS will be built natively on IPv6.
  • Old concerns over the cost of IPv6 deployment had been largely rendered unnecessary. The cost now for an IPv6 testbed is nothing compared to the costs associated with catching up to the rest of the IPv6 enabled world.
  • IPv6 allows for end-to-end connections without the need to rely on CDN translation. That means companies have a direct connection to their customers.

The statistics shared by the panelists illustrate the unavoidable fact that IPv6 adoption and the march towards the new Internet are intertwined and inseparable.

The IPv6 panel at CES was a success, but more work needs to be done to spread the message that IPv6 is here to stay. It’s easy to sell the idea of a connected product at a show like CES. Who doesn’t want a home that is smarter than its occupants? Why not have a smartphone that connects to my wearable device, my computer and my car? The promise of the Internet of Things is one of convenience and that’s an easy sell for busy consumers looking to remove one more choice from their busy day. But all this promise of a connected future won’t amount to anything besides lip service if we don’t have a next generation Internet that can handle all of the connections and the flood of data it will generate.

ARIN will continue to spread the Get6 message to all who will hear it, but it is equally important that you — as a member of the Internet community — become an active participant. If you are reading this blog post, thank you. You’ve taken the first step. We now need you to take the next step by spreading the Get6 message to your colleagues and your online communities. Facebook, Verizon Wireless and Comcast are among those who have already begun to prepare for the New Internet. Are you?

This post was originally published on TeamARIN’s website.

Written by Jeff Urbanchuk, Author at Stanton Communications

Read more here:: www.circleid.com/rss/topics/ipv6

The Promise of Connectivity at CES Means Nothing without IPv6

By jbly

IPv6 Panel at CES 2016

By Jeff Urbanchuk, Stanton Communications

For a few years now, we have been promised a bright future where connected devices all communicate with each other on the Internet of Things. If this year’s CES was any indication, the consumer technology industry is just about ready to deliver on that promise with a flood of new devices and products that will transform the way we interact with technology on a fundamental level.

The future certainly looks bright, but what isn’t mentioned in the keynotes and in booth pitches on the CES show floor is that the transformative effects of the Internet of Things will never be felt as long as device manufacturers, web content developers and consumer technology interests still operate on yesterday’s Internet.

The reality of the Internet’s current evolutionary state is known to every network engineer and IT professional from the largest ISP to the smallest start-up. In late 2015, ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, announced that they had exhausted their free pool of IPv4 number resources. This was an important announcement indicating the time had finally come to look beyond IPv4 to the future. To bridge the gap left by IPv4 exhaustion, consumer tech companies, service providers and websites must switch to IPv6, which will offer a near endless supply of IP addresses for the new Internet and the connected devices that wowed the 170,000 attendees at CES.

Here’s the bottom line: IPv6 it isn’t a “feature” for a new product or a talking point on a marketing brochure. IPv6 is a requirement for every connected device on the market today.

This sounds fairly clear-cut to the casual observer. Unfortunately, this isn’t how IPv6 migration has been regarded by a large percentage of the consumer technology industry that is continuing to hold the adoption of IPv6 at arm’s length. That’s a problem that must be addressed before the IoT takes off and that’s why ARIN decided to take the IPv6 message right to the audiences that matter at CES.

Working with our contacts at the Consumer Technology Association, ARIN scheduled a pre-show panel discussion for Tuesday January 5th on IPv6 titled “Your Customers are on the New Internet. Are You?” On the panel were some of the best engineers working on IPv6 deployment today. The all-star line-up was anchored by ARIN’s president and CEO, John Curran, and included Paul Saab from Facebook, John Brzozowski from Comcast, Samir Vaidya from Verizon Wireless and Limor Schafman, from TIA. Moderating the panel was CTA’s own Brian Markwalter.

The room in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center was standing room only and ready to hear some compelling information on the Internet’s move to IPv6. Maybe there is some hope after all that the big guns in consumer tech finally “get it.”

Each of the panelists offered a good deal of data and statistics to support their call for IPv6 migration, but one of the standouts was one fact presented by Facebook’s Paul Saab. It’s this:

  • The normal router found in the average home has the capacity to connect to about 50 devices with IPv4.That same router with IPv6 could connect every single device known to man.

Imagine that for a moment – one router with enough capacity to connect a near endless stream of devices with IPv6. This is the key that will unlock an entire ecosystem of devices for the IoT and sustain the estimated 50 billion connected devices that Cisco estimates will be on the market by 2020.

Here are some other key takeaways from the panel:

  • IPv4 has exhausted and for the Internet to evolve, companies, products manufacturers and web hosting companies can either advance to IPv6 or stay in the past. In other words, if you aren’t moving to IPv6, your competitors are.
  • Comcast estimates that 97 percent of devices it sees are managed using only IPv6.
  • IPv6 is the connection method of choice for Facebook, with over 10 percent of the world’s users connecting to the service over IPv6.
  • Facebook also sees faster connections over IPv6 compared to IPv4, offering users the opportunity to connect to their content faster over rival services.
  • Comcast has deployed IPv6 100 percent across its network and its next generation of the X1 Entertainment OS will be built natively on IPv6.
  • Old concerns over the cost of IPv6 deployment had been largely rendered unnecessary. The cost now for an IPv6 testbed is nothing compared to the costs associated with catching up to the rest of the IPv6 enabled world.
  • IPv6 allows for end-to-end connections without the need to rely on CDN translation. That means companies have a direct connection to their customers.

The statistics shared by the panelists illustrate the unavoidable fact that IPv6 adoption and the march towards the new Internet are intertwined and inseparable.

The IPv6 panel at CES was a success, but more work needs to be done to spread the message that IPv6 is here to stay. It’s easy to sell the idea of a connected product at a show like CES. Who doesn’t want a home that is smarter than its occupants? Why not have a smartphone that connects to my wearable device, my computer and my car? The promise of the Internet of Things is one of convenience and that’s an easy sell for busy consumers looking to remove one more choice from their busy day. But all this promise of a connected future won’t amount to anything besides lip service if we don’t have a next generation Internet that can handle all of the connections and the flood of data it will generate.

ARIN will continue to spread the Get6 message to all who will hear it, but it is equally important that you – as a member of the Internet community – become an active participant. If you are reading this blog post, thank you. You’ve taken the first step. We now need you to take the next step by spreading the Get6 message to your colleagues and your online communities. Facebook, Verizon Wireless and Comcast are among those who have already begun to prepare for the New Internet. Are you?

The post The Promise of Connectivity at CES Means Nothing without IPv6 appeared first on Team ARIN.

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Running out of Internet addresses: What IPv4 exhaustion means for you

By Michael Ansaldo

We reached the end of an Internet era just a few weeks ago. The American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), the body that distributes Internet addresses in North America, announced it had exhausted its pool of numbers based on the IPv4 standard. Though invisible to users, IPv4 played a huge role in creating the Internet as we know it by facilitating the connection of millions of computers, smartphones, tablets, and smart devices.

That was its ultimate — and perhaps inevitable — undoing. By enabling this vast network of connected devices, it helped spawn more Internet users and devices and than it could ever accommodate. The news has hastened a transition to IPv6, the next-generation Internet protocol that’s been waiting in the wings for more than a dozen years. And while this newer standard is the ultimate answer for supporting our growing array of connected thermostats, watches, cars, and other smart devices, there are a few things you need to know to prepare for the change.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: www.infoworld.com/category/networking/index.rss

Running out of Internet addresses: What IPv4 exhaustion means for you

By Michael Ansaldo

We reached the end of an Internet era just a few weeks ago. The American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), the body that distributes Internet addresses in North America, announced it had exhausted its pool of numbers based on the IPv4 standard. Though invisible to users, IPv4 played a huge role in creating the Internet as we know it by facilitating the connection of millions of computers, smartphones, tablets, and smart devices.

That was its ultimate—and perhaps inevitable—undoing. By enabling this vast network of connected devices, it helped spawn more Internet users and devices and than it could ever accommodate. The news has hastened a transition to IPv6, the next-generation Internet protocol that’s been waiting in the wings for more than a dozen years. And while this newer standard is the ultimate answer for supporting our growing array of connected thermostats, watches, cars, and other smart devices, there are a few things you need to know to prepare for the change.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: feeds.pcworld.com/pcworld/latestnews

Volkswagen, the Internet of Things, and Cheating Sensors

By A.R. Guess

by Angela Guess Forbes contributor Theo Priestley recently wrote, “Gartner IT analyst Doug Laney defined the 3 V’s of Big Data (Volume, Variety, Velocity) in a 2001 MetaGroup research publication. Since then there have been revisions by various analysts and vendors, but this week another V exposed a severe weakness not only in Big Data…

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