ipv6 adoption 2015

Microsoft, Adafruit Partner on Windows IoT Core Starter Kit

The companies offer a Raspberry Pi 2-based bundle to help enthusiasts and Internet of things developers get up and running fast.

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Sync’ing the Internet of Things to the pace of the business

By rss@it-analysis.com (Rob Bamforth, Quocirca)

Rob Bamforth
By: Rob Bamforth, Principal Analyst, Quocirca
Posted: 2nd September 2015
Copyright Quocirca © 2015

I must be a fan of smart connected things—sitting here with 2 wrist wearable devices in a house equipped with thirteen wireless thermostats and an environmental (temp, humidity, co2) monitoring system. However, even with all this data collection, an Internet of Things (IoT) poster-child application that works out the lifestyles of those in the household and adapts the heating to suit would be a total WOMBAT (waste of money, brains and time).

Why? Systems engineering—frequency response and the feedback loop.

The house’s heating ‘system’ has much more lag time than the connected IT/IoT technology would expect. Thermal mass, trickle under floor heating and ventilation heat recovery systems mean a steady state heating system, not one optimised by high frequency energy trading algorithms. The monitoring is there for infrequent anomaly detection (and re-assurance), not minute by minute variation and endless adjustments.

The same concepts can be applied to business systems. Some are indeed high frequency, with tight feedback loops that can, with little or no damping or shock absorption, be both very flexible and highly volatile. For example, the Typhoon Eurofighter aircraft with its inherent instability can only be supported by masses of data being collected, analysed and fed back in real-time to make pin-point corrections to keep control. Another example is the vast connected banking and financial sector, where there is feedback, but with no over-arching central control the systems occasionally either do not respond quickly enough or go into a kind of destructive volatile resonance.

Most business systems are not this highly strung. However, there is still a frequency response, or measure of the outputs in response to inputs that characterise the dynamics of the ‘system’, i.e. the business processes. Getting to grips with this is key to understanding the impact of change or what happens when things go wrong. This means processes need to be well understood—measured and benchmarked.

In the ‘old days’, we might have called these “time and motion” studies; progress chasers with stopwatches and clipboards measuring the minutiae of activities of those working on a given task. A problem was that workers (often rightly) thought they were being individually slighted for any out of the ordinary changes or inefficiency in the process, when in reality other (unmeasured) things were often at fault. This approach did not necessarily measure the things that mattered, only things that were easy to measure—a constant failing of many benchmarking systems, even today.

Fast-forward to the 1990s and a similar approach tried to implement improvements through major upheavals under a pragmatic guise—business process re-engineering (BPR). A good idea in principal, especially to bring a closer relationship between resources such as IT and business process, but unfortunately many organisations ditched the engineering principals and took a more simplistic route by using BPR as a pretext to reduce staff numbers. BPR became synonymous with ‘downsizing’.

Through the IoT there is now an opportunity to pick up on some of the important BPR principles, especially those with respect to measurement, having suitable resources to support the process and monitoring for on-going continuous improvement (or unanticipated failures). With a more holistic approach to monitoring, organisations can properly understand the behaviour and frequency response of a system or process by capturing a large and varied number of measurements in real time, and then be able to analyse all the data and take steps to make improvements.

Which brings us to the feedback loop. The mistake that technologists often make is that since automating part of a process appears to make things a little more efficient, then fully automating it must make it completely efficient.

While automating and streamlining can help improve efficiency, they can also introduce risks if the automation is out of step with the behaviour of the system and its frequency response. This leads to wasting money on systems that do not have the ability to respond quickly or alternatively, destructive (resonant) behaviour in those that respond too fast.

It might seem cool and sexy to go after a futuristic strategy of fully automated systems, but the IoT has many practical tactical benefits by holding a digital mirror up to the real world and a good first step that many organisations would benefits from would be to use it for benchmarking, analysis and incremental improvements.

First published in www.computerweekly.com

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SolidRun Ltd. announces its HummingBoard-Edge computer with industry’s highest feature density for IoT Smart Edge Applications

SolidRun Ltd. announced today the launch of the HummingBoard-Edge™ ; a feature rich, small and powerful, low-cost ARM computer based on Freescale’s i.MX6 leading embedded processor. The HummingBoard-Edge is the new high-end member of SolidRun’s HummingBoard™ family. The HummingBoard-Edge incorporates unique features such as M.2 module support, eMMC storage and wide range voltage input (7…

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Atmel Introduces World’s Most Innovative 2-pin, Self-Powered Serial EEPROM Targeting the IoT, Battery, Consumable and Cable Identification Markets

Atmel® Corporation recently launched the industry’s most innovative Single-Wire EEPROM with only two-pins – a data pin and ground pin for operation – making the new family ideal for the Internet of Things (IoT), wearables, consumable, battery and cable identification markets. The new devices are self-powered, eliminating the need for a power source or Vcc pin, with a…

The post Atmel Introduces World’s Most Innovative 2-pin, Self-Powered Serial EEPROM Targeting the IoT, Battery, Consumable and Cable Identification Markets appeared first on IoT.do.

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Qualcomm Closes $2.4B CSR Buy

Expands product lines and channels to accelerate growth in IoT and automotive sectors.

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Exclusive Q&A with Doris Mattingly, Director of Engineering at Lantronix – Part 2/2

In the second part of our interview with Doris Mattingly, Director of Engineering at Lantronix, we talk about which industries she believes will be the next to benefit from IoT and what could be done to encourage more women to work within the M2M and IoT sector. Why is M2M not being more widely adopted […]

The post Exclusive Q&A with Doris Mattingly, Director of Engineering at Lantronix – Part 2/2 appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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New Weightless 2-Way Communication IoT standard launches

The Weightless SIG announced that M²Communication (M2COMM), a provider of industrial IoT connectivity technologies, has joined the Weightless SIG to lead a Weightless Working Group for the development of a new high performance LPWAN Standard. This latest standard, called Weightless-P, will offer uplink and downlink capabilities to significantly enhance quality of service especially important in the […]

The post New Weightless 2-Way Communication IoT standard launches appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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Americas are just 2 weeks away from running out of IPv4 addresses

By Bob Brown

John Curran, CEO of the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), told attendees at the Campus Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday that the IP address authority’s pool of IPv4 addresses has dwindled to 90,000 and will be exhausted in about two weeks.

“This is a pretty dramatic issue,” says Curran, who founded ARIN in 1997 and was once CTO of Internet pioneer BBN.

[ Check out InfoWorld’s New Tech Forum, where you can learn all about new enterprise technology — without the hype. | Read Bill Snyder’s Tech’s Bottom Line blog for what the key business trends mean to you. ]

Curran’s revelation came during a talk during which he urged IT pros from educational institutions to upgrade their public facing websites to IPv6 as soon as possible. Not that the IPv4 address pool drying up will result in such websites being cut off from the Internet, but Curran did say moving to IPv6 will provide much more direct access to end users whose mobile and other devices increasingly have IPv6 rather than IPv4 addresses.

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Americas are just 2 weeks away from running out of IPv4 addresses

By Bob Brown

John Curran, CEO of the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), told attendees at the Campus Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday that the IP address authority’s pool of IPv4 addresses has dwindled to 90,000 and will be exhausted in about two weeks.

“This is a pretty dramatic issue,” says Curran, who founded ARIN in 1997 and was once CTO of Internet pioneer BBN.

Curran’s revelation came during a talk during which he urged IT pros from educational institutions to upgrade their public facing websites to IPv6 as soon as possible. Not that the IPv4 address pool drying up will result in such websites being cut off from the Internet, but Curran did say moving to IPv6 will provide much more direct access to end users whose mobile and other devices increasingly have IPv6 rather than IPv4 addresses.

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Imagine Cup World Finals Day 2: A sneak peek at Microsoft HoloLens and more fun

Imagine Cup finalists from around the world got an exclusive peek at Microsoft HoloLens, ate lunch in the bustling Microsoft Commons and watched Raspberry Pi CEO Eben Upton play with robots at a presentation about the Internet of Things. …

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