(ipv6 and security) -ipv4

IoT: Top 7 Challenges

The IoT represents a unique set of challenges that pose a real threat to its utility as an engine of economic growth.

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IoT: Top 7 Challenges

By News Aggregator

The IoT represents a unique set of challenges that pose a real threat to its utility as an engine of economic growth.

Read more here:: www.itbusinessedge.com/feeds

The post IoT: Top 7 Challenges appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Smart thermostats gain traction in Europe and North America

By Sheetal Kumbhar

Berg Insight, the M2M/IoT market research provider, released new findings about the smart thermostat market. The number of North American and European homes with a smart thermostat grew by 67% to 10.1 million in 2016. The North American market recorded a 64% growth in the installed base of smart thermostats to 7.8 million. In Europe, […]

The post Smart thermostats gain traction in Europe and North America appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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Smart thermostats gain traction in Europe and North America

By News Aggregator

By Sheetal Kumbhar

Berg Insight, the M2M/IoT market research provider, released new findings about the smart thermostat market. The number of North American and European homes with a smart thermostat grew by 67% to 10.1 million in 2016. The North American market recorded a 64% growth in the installed base of smart thermostats to 7.8 million. In Europe, […]

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7 Things to consider when designing an IoT system

By IoT Now Magazine

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7 Things to consider when designing an IoT system

By News Aggregator

By IoT Now Magazine

The post 7 Things to consider when designing an IoT system appeared first on IoT Now – How to run an IoT enabled business.

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The post 7 Things to consider when designing an IoT system appeared on IPv6.net.

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Access All the Resources in the World

By News Aggregator

IPv6 to access all the resources in the world

By Charles R. Watts III

IPv6 Case Study from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania

Washington and Jefferson College is ready for IPv6. When we first started to look into doing IPv6, our initial thinking was that we could get a range of addresses, and then take our time with the rollout. However, once we got our ARIN assignment, we took off with it. We knew more and more systems are going to be IPv4 and IPv6, so we wanted to be able to access all the resources in the world, and we wanted people to be able to access all of our resources too. We did not want to be in a situation where we were limiting ourselves.

Brace yourself for impact (or not)

In the past when I have gone to conferences and heard people talking about IPv6, they would paint this picture that IPv6 is very complicated so brace yourself for impact. Then after we got our addresses, I thought to myself, this is not as complicated as I thought it was going to be. Once I got the proper materials, started researching and planning, it was not a nightmare like people had made it out to be. Some resources that we used to get up to speed were online tech documents, message boards, and books like Cisco IPv6 Fundamentals or Cisco IPv6 for Enterprise Networks. Fear of the unknown has led some to ignore IPv6, but really, we are running out of excuses.

Our process

Washington and Jefferson College acquired IPv6 from ARIN in 2013. Later that year, we started an in-depth planning stage. In early 2014, we enabled and configured IPv6 in our network core and on our critical servers like domain controllers, LDAP servers, DNS servers, etc. Then as the year went on, we did more testing. We decided to go with Stateful DHCPv6 for clients, so once we had everything set up on our servers and in our network core, we configured a test VLAN with just IPv6 to see if we could get internal communication to work. Once we could do that with IPv6, we set up an admin VLAN for our department that was dual stack to test if we were communicating with different servers over IPv4 and IPv6. The next year, after we switched Internet Service Providers, we expanded out to our ISP so we could communicate with the rest of the world via IPv6. Once we verified that everything was working on our critical servers and admin VLAN, we then moved on to internal servers and services people would access from off campus like our VPN servers.

In our server room infrastructure out to the Internet, we are set up and live with IPv6. Our plan now is to expand out to our faculty, staff, and computer labs. When we were initially deciding to implement IPv6, our Server Manager, Jason Pergola, and myself talked to our CIO, Dan Faulk, about moving forward with acquiring an IPv6 range. Because of the uncertainties with IPv6 and not many, if any, colleges in our area even thinking about IPv6 yet, our CIO asked that we first put together an initial plan. After discussing our plan and the benefits, we were given the green light to move forward. Laying out a road map is what helped to make a good convincing case.

Timeline

Snags

We hit a few snags along the way, but for the most part everything seemed to run smoothly. At first, we found all Windows systems would pull an IPv6 address via DHCPv6, but we could not get any Mac computers to pull one. If we took the same Mac to our home ISP, it would work. It turned out a colon in the wrong place caused a lot of confusion (think a link-local address format of FE80:7::1 instead of FE80::7:1 – a result of us trying to be fancy with manually configuring the link-local address instead of allowing IPv6 to automatically generate it). Once we figured it out and assigned the same link-local address to every VLAN interface with the FE80::#:# format, we were good to go.

As a smaller institution, we lucked out because we had just upgraded our firewall and Internet management appliance, and we just did an update on our core switch. All of our backbone network equipment and server infrastructure supported IPv6. Everything fell into place. We currently have some parts of our campus that have older networking equipment that do not support IPv6, which we are in the process of phasing out. With recent upgrades, we are now ready to continue the rollout.

IPv6 from a recruiting standpoint

Benefits

Our Server Manager said he noticed a huge speed boost to our email servers once we opened IPv6 to the rest of the world. At first with IPv4 only, there was a lag but once our servers were also communicating with the outside world via IPv6, those processes were not taking nearly as long. It appeared that those servers were trying to use IPv6 first and when they could not, they would rollover to IPv4. We have also noticed that some Internet activity seems to be responding quicker than it did over IPv4, like accessing certain websites or videos. It could be the way different content loads, or it could be something with the way our ISP has their IPv6 network infrastructure set up.

From a recruiting standpoint, if you have potential students who are researching your college and they are not able to connect to you because they are running IPv6-only, then I feel like you are hurting the institution. Or if there are students currently enrolled that are looking to do research, and they can’t connect to the proper resources, that isn’t allowing students to complete their classes and get good grades.

IT industry learn IPv6

Final Thoughts

IPv6 is not as scary as many people are making it out to be. Like anything else in the IT industry, you have to put in the time to actually learn IPv6. By not doing it, you are limiting your institution by not being able to communicate with everything in the world.

Do proper research and planning. Even to this day, we are still learning. Do not be afraid to ask questions. No matter how bizarre the issue is, you never know who will give you the right answer that may lead somewhere else. Or you may be helping out someone else without even knowing it.

The post Access All the Resources in the World appeared first on Team ARIN.

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The post Access All the Resources in the World appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Access All the Resources in the World

By Charles R. Watts III

IPv6 to access all the resources in the world

IPv6 Case Study from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania

Washington and Jefferson College is ready for IPv6. When we first started to look into doing IPv6, our initial thinking was that we could get a range of addresses, and then take our time with the rollout. However, once we got our ARIN assignment, we took off with it. We knew more and more systems are going to be IPv4 and IPv6, so we wanted to be able to access all the resources in the world, and we wanted people to be able to access all of our resources too. We did not want to be in a situation where we were limiting ourselves.

Brace yourself for impact (or not)

In the past when I have gone to conferences and heard people talking about IPv6, they would paint this picture that IPv6 is very complicated so brace yourself for impact. Then after we got our addresses, I thought to myself, this is not as complicated as I thought it was going to be. Once I got the proper materials, started researching and planning, it was not a nightmare like people had made it out to be. Some resources that we used to get up to speed were online tech documents, message boards, and books like Cisco IPv6 Fundamentals or Cisco IPv6 for Enterprise Networks. Fear of the unknown has led some to ignore IPv6, but really, we are running out of excuses.

Our process

Washington and Jefferson College acquired IPv6 from ARIN in 2013. Later that year, we started an in-depth planning stage. In early 2014, we enabled and configured IPv6 in our network core and on our critical servers like domain controllers, LDAP servers, DNS servers, etc. Then as the year went on, we did more testing. We decided to go with Stateful DHCPv6 for clients, so once we had everything set up on our servers and in our network core, we configured a test VLAN with just IPv6 to see if we could get internal communication to work. Once we could do that with IPv6, we set up an admin VLAN for our department that was dual stack to test if we were communicating with different servers over IPv4 and IPv6. The next year, after we switched Internet Service Providers, we expanded out to our ISP so we could communicate with the rest of the world via IPv6. Once we verified that everything was working on our critical servers and admin VLAN, we then moved on to internal servers and services people would access from off campus like our VPN servers.

In our server room infrastructure out to the Internet, we are set up and live with IPv6. Our plan now is to expand out to our faculty, staff, and computer labs. When we were initially deciding to implement IPv6, our Server Manager, Jason Pergola, and myself talked to our CIO, Dan Faulk, about moving forward with acquiring an IPv6 range. Because of the uncertainties with IPv6 and not many, if any, colleges in our area even thinking about IPv6 yet, our CIO asked that we first put together an initial plan. After discussing our plan and the benefits, we were given the green light to move forward. Laying out a road map is what helped to make a good convincing case.

Timeline

IPv6 Timeline

Snags

We hit a few snags along the way, but for the most part everything seemed to run smoothly. At first, we found all Windows systems would pull an IPv6 address via DHCPv6, but we could not get any Mac computers to pull one. If we took the same Mac to our home ISP, it would work. It turned out a colon in the wrong place caused a lot of confusion (think a link-local address format of FE80:7::1 instead of FE80::7:1 – a result of us trying to be fancy with manually configuring the link-local address instead of allowing IPv6 to automatically generate it). Once we figured it out and assigned the same link-local address to every VLAN interface with the FE80::#:# format, we were good to go.

As a smaller institution, we lucked out because we had just upgraded our firewall and Internet management appliance, and we just did an update on our core switch. All of our backbone network equipment and server infrastructure supported IPv6. Everything fell into place. We currently have some parts of our campus that have older networking equipment that do not support IPv6, which we are in the process of phasing out. With recent upgrades, we are now ready to continue the rollout.

IPv6 from a recruiting standpoint

Benefits

Our Server Manager said he noticed a huge speed boost to our email servers once we opened IPv6 to the rest of the world. At first with IPv4 only, there was a lag but once our servers were also communicating with the outside world via IPv6, those processes were not taking nearly as long. It appeared that those servers were trying to use IPv6 first and when they could not, they would rollover to IPv4. We have also noticed that some Internet activity seems to be responding quicker than it did over IPv4, like accessing certain websites or videos. It could be the way different content loads, or it could be something with the way our ISP has their IPv6 network infrastructure set up.

From a recruiting standpoint, if you have potential students who are researching your college and they are not able to connect to you because they are running IPv6-only, then I feel like you are hurting the institution. Or if there are students currently enrolled that are looking to do research, and they can’t connect to the proper resources, that isn’t allowing students to complete their classes and get good grades.

IT industry learn IPv6

Final Thoughts

IPv6 is not as scary as many people are making it out to be. Like anything else in the IT industry, you have to put in the time to actually learn IPv6. By not doing it, you are limiting your institution by not being able to communicate with everything in the world.

Do proper research and planning. Even to this day, we are still learning. Do not be afraid to ask questions. No matter how bizarre the issue is, you never know who will give you the right answer that may lead somewhere else. Or you may be helping out someone else without even knowing it.

The post Access All the Resources in the World appeared first on Team ARIN.

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Launch: PCs, Mac, Smart or IoT Devices: Remo Software offers Tech Help For Free

By Carly Zed Zander

REMO tech help for free

Remo Software believes that not every technical assistance should be paid for. Bangalore based software company Remo Software is now offering free technical help for those who struggle with day-to-day tech problems with their PCs, Mac, Smart or IoT Devices. You can just submit a request and get timely help from trained technicians and its totally free.

Remo Software believes that not every technical assistance should be paid for. Bangalore based software company Remo Software is now offering free technical help for those who struggle with day-to-day tech problems with their PCs, Mac, Smart or IoT Devices. You can just submit a request and get timely help from trained technicians and its totally free.

“Out of the hundreds of presales queries we get every day from SOHOs, we found not all problems required to buy a paid software or even spend a penny,” explained Omer Faiyaz, CEO Remo Software. “In our efforts to help a non-tech person, we came up with a platform where anyone can submit a request for help. Our technical experts will help them resolve their tech problems.”

Currently, Remo Software is focusing on to provide support in areas where their expertise is.

A few of them are:
1. Slow Computer
2. Windows Error
3. File Repair/ Conversion
4. Data Recovery
5. Outlook Annoyances
6. Parental Control
7. IoT Devices.

In a world where software, operating system and technologies are ever changing, troubleshooting any issue requires some level of tech know-how. Remo Software has a proven record of developing advanced, easy-to-use software to fix several tech problems.

Their latest service offering #TechHelpForFree is to serve those who lack time and knowledge to deal with small tech problems. Remo Software agrees that they don’t know it all, as the problems could be varied, but being in the PC Tech & IoT business they know how to get to a solution. They believe this service would in-turn help them get new product ideas and increase their own tech strengths.

About Remo Software:
Founded in 2011, Remo Software – a Microsoft Gold Partner, develops software to make technology easy for non-tech users. The company started off as a consumer software provider of data recovery & repair tools and later launched its flagship product Remo MORE – a parental control, location tracking and multi-device management solution for home users first at the CES, Las Vegas 2014.

For more information, please visit: https://www.remosoftware.com/.

Twitter: @remosoftware #TechHelpForFree

Related link: https://www.remosoftware.com/

This version of news story was published on and is Copr. © Advertising Industry Newswire™ (AdvertisingIndustryNewswire.com) – part of the Neotrope® News Network, USA – all rights reserved. Information is believed accurate but is not guaranteed. For questions about the above news, contact the company/org/person noted in the text and NOT this website.

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Announcing ION Durban with South Africa iWeek in September

By Megan Kruse

After two great ION Conferences so far this year in Islamabad and Costa Rica, we are very pleased to announce that we’re hard at work on ION Durban, which will take place on Thursday, 7 September, alongside the South Africa iWeek.

We’re lucky to once again have a full-day program so we can cover all our favorite topics including IPv6, DNSSEC, Securing BGP, and TLS for Applications. As usual, this ION has generous support from our ION Conference Series Sponsor Afilias.

We’re working on the agenda and speakers now, so if you’ll be attending iWeek and you think you might make a good candidate, please speak up in the comments below or via our
social media channels. A quick preview of some of our draft session titles:

  • Why Implement DNSSEC?
  • Deploying DNSSEC: A Case Study
  • IPv6: Are We There Yet?
  • What’s Happening at the IETF? Internet Standards and How to Get Involved
  • Collaborative Security: Routing Resilience Manifesto and MANRS
  • Best Current Operational Practices – An Update
  • IPv6 Success Stories – Network Operators Tell All!

iWeek is South Africa’s leading annual Internet industry conference, and has been held each year since 2001. iWeek brings together all of South Africa’s major Internet organizations for a series of presentations, workshops, training programs, and social events. The event partners are:

  • The Internet Service Providers’ Association (ISPA)
  • The ZA Central Registry (ZACR)
  • The ZA Domain Name Authority (ZADNA)
  • The South African Internet Exchange (INX-ZA)

We’re still working out the logistics and registration details, so stay tuned to the ION Durban website or this blog for more information. We’re also planning to live stream the ION, so even if you can’t be there in person you’ll be able to follow along online.

We’re also still working on more ION Conference locations for for 2017, as well as our 2018 and beyond locations. Are you part of something that might lend itself to co-locating with an ION? Let us know! We hold several events each year in locations all over the world, and we are open to all sorts of opportunities. Contact us to discuss co-location possibilities, or how your company could sponsor an existing ION Conference.

We hope to see you in Durban, or at a future event!

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