ipv6 protocol

AI Investment Up, ROI Remains Iffy

By George Leopold

Real-world applications for artificial intelligence are emerging in areas such as boosting the productivity of dispersed workforces. However, early adopters are still struggling to determine the return on initial AI investments, according to a pair of new vendor reports.

Red Hat released research this week indicating that AI deployments have yielded some tangible results in areas such as transportation and utilities that rely heavily on field workers. A separate forecast released Wednesday (Jan.17) by Narrative Science found growing enterprise adoption of AI technologies but little in the way of investment returns.

Chicago-based Narrative Science, which sells natural language generation technology, found that 61 percent of those companies it surveyed deployed AI technologies in 2017. Early deployments focused on business intelligence, finance and product management. “In 2018, the focus will be on ensuring enterprises get value from their AI investments,” company CEO Stuart Frankel noted in releasing the survey.

Early adopters are also encountering many of the hurdles associated with a “first mover” advantage. “More and more organizations are deploying AI-powered technologies, with goals such as improving worker productivity and enhancing the customer experience that are not only laudable, but achievable,” Narrative Science concluded. “A focus on realistic deployment timeframes and accurately measuring the effectiveness and [return on investment] of AI is critical to keeping the current momentum around the technology moving forward.”

Meanwhile, the Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) survey also found an uptick in AI deployments, with 30 percent of respondents planning to implement AI for “field service workers” this year. Other applications include predictive analytics, machine learning and robotics.

While issues such as securing data access and a lack of standards persist, Red Hat found that field workers are “now at the forefront of digital transformation where artificial intelligence, smart mobile devices, the Internet of Things (IoT) and business process management technologies have created new opportunities to better streamline and transform traditional workflows and workforce management practices.”

A predicted 25 percent increase in AI investment through November 2018 is seen transforming field service operations, Red Hat noted in a blog posted on Thursday (Jan. 18). Early movers cited increase field worker productivity (46 percent), streamlining field operations (40 percent) and improving customer service (37 percent) as the top business factors for investing in AI.

Along with a lack of standards, respondents said deployment challenges include keeping pace with technological change and integrating AI deployments with legacy systems. The survey notes that industry groups are focusing on standards and interoperability among IoT devices along with data security while improving integration technologies.

Earlier vendor surveys also have identified barriers to implementation ranging from a lack of IT infrastructure suited to AI applications to a lack AI expertise. For instance, a survey released last fall by data analytics vendor Teradata Corp. (NYSE: TDC) found that 30 percent of those it polled said greater investments would be required to expand AI deployments.

Despite the promise and pitfalls of AI—ranging from freeing workers from drudgery to displacing those same workers—early AI deployments appear to underscore the reality that the technology remains a solution in search of a problem.

Recent items:

AI Seen Better Suited to IoT Than Big Data

AI Adopters Confront Barriers to ROI

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On the Road Again: Highlights from ARIN’s Outreach

By Susan Hamlin

We are celebrating our 20th anniversary this December and have found ourselves reflecting over these last two wonderful decades. One of the most important organizational objectives we have here at ARIN is our community outreach efforts. We make it a priority to reach out to you, our community, to provide the tools and advice you need when it comes to Internet number resources. We have hosted and attended an incredible number of events over the years, and thought it would be fun to look back and share where we’ve been and what we’ve accomplished with our community.

What kind of outreach do we do?

Each year, we host or attend a number of different events. Twice annually we hold our Public Policy and Members Meetings in the second and fourth quarters in various locations throughout our region. These meetings provide an opportunity for the entire Internet community to engage in policy discussions, network with colleagues, and attend workshops and tutorials. Everyone with an interest in Internet number resources is welcome to attend the Public Policy & Members Meetings and registration is free!

We also host many ARIN on the Road events around our region throughout the year. These free events provide local communities with the latest news from ARIN, covering everything from requesting IP addresses and Autonomous System Numbers (ASNs) to the status of IPv6 adoption, to current policy discussions, and updates about our technical services. Did you know that you can request an ARIN on the Road in your city, town, or metro area? I encourage you to send an email to info@arin.net if you believe your local Internet community would be interested in participating.

While we do discuss IPv6 at ARIN on the Road, that is not the only way we continue to spread the word in support of IPv6 deployment. Our message has evolved since we started actively promoting IPv6 in 2007, when we set up our TeamARIN site and began exhibiting at major industry shows. Today we exhibit at fewer tradeshows, but we do send speakers to many events across a wide range of industries, where we encourage organizations to prepare for the future by enabling IPv6 on their websites.

Additionally, members of our team attend community events around the world. Whether it be other RIR meetings, Internet Governance events, or partners such as NANOG or CARIBNOG, we believe it’s important to show our support to the wider Internet community. For a full list of events we host or attend, check out our events page.

Where was our first meeting?

Our first members meeting took place in Chantilly, Virginia on 20 March 1998. Since then, we’ve held a total of 40 meetings over the last 20 years!

Where was our first AOTR?

Our first ARIN on the Road event was held in Phoenix, Arizona on 17 August 2010. Since then we have held an additional 46 AOTR events and counting!

How can you get involved?

Phew! As you can see, we’ve done a lot over the last 20 years, but we’ve only just begun. We plan to continue expanding our outreach efforts around our region, including a continued focus on the Caribbean, and it is all possible thanks to our wonderful community.

There are so many ways you can continue to get involved with ARIN, including:

  • Subscribe to our mailing lists to discuss Internet number resource policy development and keep up with ARIN services and activities
  • Attend an ARIN meeting – We have great remote participation capabilities if needed
  • Don’t forget you can apply for a fellowship! We are accepting fellowship applications to ARIN 41 in Miami 15-18 April 2018
  • Attend our ARIN on the Road events
  • Member organizations, get involved in our election process

The post On the Road Again: Highlights from ARIN’s Outreach appeared first on Team ARIN.

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Looking Back on our Youth and Academia Outreach Efforts in Africa This Year

As 2017 is almost over, we’d like to take a moment to reflect on our engagement journey with the youth and academic communities in Africa.

One of our fundamental objectives has been to create awareness that will lead to meaningful participation of the African community in ICANN and in the wider Internet governance ecosystem. According to the Africa Union, 65 percent of Africans are below the age of 35. The World Economic Forum states that the 10 youngest populations of the world are all in Africa. This reality makes it imperative that we put youth at the center of our regional engagement agenda.

Africa, home to hundreds of higher education institutions in 54 countries, is also diverse, which makes effective engagement a challenge. So far, we have focused on regional platforms such as national and regional educational networks (NRENs) and the Association of African Universities (AAU), to bring together administrators, students, and faculty. Additionally, we have organized multiple workshops and public lectures directly with universities whenever our resources were sufficient. This blog describes some of our outreach efforts during the year.

Two years ago, we piloted the youth community workshops, an initiative targeted at introducing young people under thirty to ICANN and the Internet ecosystem. This program complemented our global ICANN NextGen and Fellowship programs. The first workshop of this series took place in April 2016 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, followed by two others – in Kenya in May and in Benin in December. In 2017, we have continued our academic outreach efforts with a number of events.

14th AAU General Conference

  • In June, ICANN hosted a workshop and participated in thematic panels geared toward academics and students at the AAU General Conference in Accra, Ghana. We also collaborated with Ghana ICANN Fellowship alumni, who organized an ICANN exhibition booth at the conference.

African Regional Conferences

  • In March, our team gathered the academic community at West and Central African Research and Education Network (WACREN) Annual Conference in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Participants learned from the leadership role that Addis-Ababa University has taken in defining Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) label generation rules for the Ethiopic script.
  • In November, we participated at UbuntuNet-Connect, the annual meeting of the Ubuntu Alliance, held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. We presented Domain Name Security Extensions (DNSSEC) and the key signing key (KSK) rollover to attending academics.

Direct University Outreach

  • In late May, on the periphery of the Africa Internet Summit Summit’17 (AIS2017) held in Nairobi, Kenya, we participated in a public lecture and panel session at the Multimedia University of Kenya. Over 50 engineering and computer science students attended the session that they later called “eye opening.” Interest in ICANN was evident, and students were encouraged to reach out – to collaborate on research ideas and efforts.
  • In September, on the sidelines of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organization Annual General Meeting held in Maputo, Mozambique, we visited Edwardo Mondlane University. There, we gave a lecture on ICANN and Internet governance to 25 students, members of the faculty, and .mz registrars.
  • Matogoro Jabera, an ICANN Fellowship alumnus, was inspired by his experience attending an ICANN Public Meeting as a Fellow. He shared his experience by organizing a workshop on Internet governance for his students. Held in September, this third successful school of Internet governance was supported by the leadership of the University of Dodoma in Tanzania and other Fellowship alumni like Bonface Witaba. ICANN, ICANNwiki, and the .za Central Registry (ZACR) also supported and participated in this workshop.

These efforts have yielded encouraging outcomes. A good number of ICANN alumni, whether from Namibia, Malawi, Benin or the Congo DRC are now active in their communities. They are working regularly with our team to deliver in-class public lectures, put together workshops and set up inaugural National IGFs to further national inclusive dialogues on Internet issues. In addition, multiple institutions of higher learning and universities have expressed their willingness for structured Memoranda with ICANN to streamline and institutionalize our partnerships.

Through these developments, it is possible to envision a future in which the youth of Africa can fully participate in the Internet ecosystem. And this progress will only happen if we all work together. It is our sincere hope that our alumni, from both the NextGen and Fellowship programs would actively seek to localize the multistakeholder Internet dialogue at the national level!

We want to thank all our partners and participants in these events. As ICANN, we remain committed to organizing programs that tap into the overwhelming potential of the youth and academic communities in Africa.

Read more here:: www.icann.org/news/blog.rss

IoT security company Pwine Express gets $8M and a new CEO

Pwine Express, the maker of Pulse IoT security platform that identifies rouge devices and networks across connected devices raised $8M in new funding from existing investors .406 Ventures, Ascent Venture Partners and Fairhaven Capital.

Pulse Device Detection

The new funding comes with the change in leadership in the form of Todd DeSisto as the company’s new CEO. Desisto is an ex-CEO of Axeda, an IoT company acquired by PTC (Nasdaq: PTC) for $170M.

“The opportunity to work with a terrific team at an IoT security company like Pwnie was too good to pass up. At Axeda we saw that as things become connected to the Internet, they also become vulnerable to cyber threats. IoT environments cannot depend on the constant integrity of every connected device to ensure their ongoing security. A system specifically designed to monitor and protect the environment is required. Pwnie is well positioned to meet this challenge,”
CEO Desisto

The company’s core solutions include network asset discovery, wireless network security, Bluetooth security and rouge device and network detection. The company also sells penetration testing devices (called pentesting devices) to detect/assess on-site network/device security.

Pwn Plug R4

The new CEO will help the company by rolling out the new channel partner programs (aimed towards managed security service providers MSSPs). The funding proceeds will also help launch new IoT security products.

The latest round of funding brings Pwine’s total equity funding to $28M. There’s been a series of investments in the IoT security startups. This year four startups including ZingBox, CloudPost, Armis, and Mocana raised north of $50M. And, there’s a group of IoT security startups that got funded by the Department of Homeland Security in Q1’17. This shows that as the number of internet-connected devices/machines has increased, so has the need to secure these assets via new solutions.

Read more here:: feeds.feedburner.com/iot