ipv6 traffic statistics

Volkswagen, the Internet of Things, and Cheating Sensors

By A.R. Guess

by Angela Guess Forbes contributor Theo Priestley recently wrote, “Gartner IT analyst Doug Laney defined the 3 V’s of Big Data (Volume, Variety, Velocity) in a 2001 MetaGroup research publication. Since then there have been revisions by various analysts and vendors, but this week another V exposed a severe weakness not only in Big Data…

The post Volkswagen, the Internet of Things, and Cheating Sensors appeared first on DATAVERSITY.

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RFC 3232 – Assigned Numbers: RFC 1700 is Replaced by an On-line Database

Network Working Group                                J. Reynolds, Editor
Request for Comments: 3232                                    RFC Editor
Obsoletes: 1700                                             January 2002
Category: Informational


Assigned Numbers: RFC 1700 is Replaced by an On-line Database


Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2002).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This memo obsoletes RFC 1700 (STD 2) "Assigned Numbers", which
   contained an October 1994 snapshot of assigned Internet protocol
   parameters.

Description

   From November 1977 through October 1994, the Internet Assigned
   Numbers Authority (IANA) periodically published tables of the
   Internet protocol parameter assignments in RFCs entitled, "Assigned
   Numbers".  The most current of these Assigned Numbers RFCs had
   Standard status and carried the designation: STD 2.  At this time,
   the latest STD 2 is RFC 1700.

   Since 1994, this sequence of RFCs have been replaced by an online
   database accessible through a web page (currently, www.iana.org).
   The purpose of the present RFC is to note this fact and to officially
   obsolete RFC 1700, whose status changes to Historic.  RFC 1700 is
   obsolete, and its values are incomplete and in some cases may be
   wrong.

   We expect this series to be revived in the future by the new IANA
   organization.

Security Considerations

   This memo does not affect the technical security of the Internet.





Reynolds                     Informational                      [Page 1]

RFC 3232         RFC 1700 Replaced by On-line Database      January 2002


Author's Address

   Joyce K. Reynolds
   RFC Editor
   4676 Admiralty Way
   Marina del Rey, CA  90292
   USA

   EMail: rfc-editor@rfc-editor.org

RFC 2464 – Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks

Network Working Group M. Crawford
Request for Comments: 2464 Fermilab
Obsoletes: 1972 December 1998
Category: Standards Track

Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

1. Introduction

This document specifies the frame format for transmission of IPv6
packets and the method of forming IPv6 link-local addresses and
statelessly autoconfigured addresses on Ethernet networks. It also
specifies the content of the Source/Target Link-layer Address option
used in Router Solicitation, Router Advertisement, Neighbor
Solicitation, Neighbor Advertisement and Redirect messages when those
messages are transmitted on an Ethernet.

This document replaces RFC 1972, "A Method for the Transmission of
IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks", which will become historic.

The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC 2119].

2. Maximum Transmission Unit

The default MTU size for IPv6 [IPV6] packets on an Ethernet is 1500
octets. This size may be reduced by a Router Advertisement [DISC]
containing an MTU option which specifies a smaller MTU, or by manual
configuration of each node. If a Router Advertisement received on an
Ethernet interface has an MTU option specifying an MTU larger than
1500, or larger than a manually configured value, that MTU option may
be logged to system management but must be otherwise ignored.

For purposes of this document, information received from DHCP is
considered "manually configured" and the term Ethernet includes
CSMA/CD and full-duplex subnetworks based on ISO/IEC 8802-3, with
various data rates.

3. Frame Format

IPv6 packets are transmitted in standard Ethernet frames. The
Ethernet header contains the Destination and Source Ethernet
addresses and the Ethernet type code, which must contain the value
86DD hexadecimal. The data field contains the IPv6 header followed
immediately by the payload, and possibly padding octets to meet the
minimum frame size for the Ethernet link.

0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Destination |
+- -+
| Ethernet |
+- -+
| Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Source |
+- -+
| Ethernet |
+- -+
| Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IPv6 |
+- -+
| header |
+- -+
| and |
+- -+
/ payload ... /
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

(Each tic mark represents one bit.)

4. Stateless Autoconfiguration

The Interface Identifier [AARCH] for an Ethernet interface is based
on the EUI-64 identifier [EUI64] derived from the interface's built-
in 48-bit IEEE 802 address. The EUI-64 is formed as follows.
(Canonical bit order is assumed throughout.)

The OUI of the Ethernet address (the first three octets) becomes the
company_id of the EUI-64 (the first three octets). The fourth and
fifth octets of the EUI are set to the fixed value FFFE hexadecimal.
The last three octets of the Ethernet address become the last three
octets of the EUI-64.

The Interface Identifier is then formed from the EUI-64 by
complementing the "Universal/Local" (U/L) bit, which is the next-to-
lowest order bit of the first octet of the EUI-64. Complementing
this bit will generally change a 0 value to a 1, since an interface's
built-in address is expected to be from a universally administered
address space and hence have a globally unique value. A universally
administered IEEE 802 address or an EUI-64 is signified by a 0 in the
U/L bit position, while a globally unique IPv6 Interface Identifier
is signified by a 1 in the corresponding position. For further
discussion on this point, see [AARCH].

For example, the Interface Identifier for an Ethernet interface whose
built-in address is, in hexadecimal,

34-56-78-9A-BC-DE

would be

36-56-78-FF-FE-9A-BC-DE.

A different MAC address set manually or by software should not be
used to derive the Interface Identifier. If such a MAC address must
be used, its global uniqueness property should be reflected in the
value of the U/L bit.

An IPv6 address prefix used for stateless autoconfiguration [ACONF]
of an Ethernet interface must have a length of 64 bits.

5. Link-Local Addresses

The IPv6 link-local address [AARCH] for an Ethernet interface is
formed by appending the Interface Identifier, as defined above, to
the prefix FE80::/64.

10 bits 54 bits 64 bits
+----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+
|1111111010| (zeros) | Interface Identifier |
+----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+

6. Address Mapping -- Unicast

The procedure for mapping IPv6 unicast addresses into Ethernet link-
layer addresses is described in [DISC]. The Source/Target Link-layer
Address option has the following form when the link layer is
Ethernet.

0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
+- Ethernet -+
| |
+- Address -+
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

Option fields:

Type 1 for Source Link-layer address.
2 for Target Link-layer address.

Length 1 (in units of 8 octets).

Ethernet Address
The 48 bit Ethernet IEEE 802 address, in canonical bit
order. This is the address the interface currently
responds to, and may be different from the built-in
address used to derive the Interface Identifier.

7. Address Mapping -- Multicast

An IPv6 packet with a multicast destination address DST, consisting
of the sixteen octets DST[1] through DST[16], is transmitted to the
Ethernet multicast address whose first two octets are the value 3333
hexadecimal and whose last four octets are the last four octets of
DST.

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1|0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| DST[13] | DST[14] |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| DST[15] | DST[16] |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

8. Differences From RFC 1972

The following are the functional differences between this
specification and RFC 1972.

The Address Token, which was a node's 48-bit MAC address, is
replaced with the Interface Identifier, which is 64 bits in
length and based on the EUI-64 format [EUI64]. An IEEE-defined
mapping exists from 48-bit MAC addresses to EUI-64 form.

A prefix used for stateless autoconfiguration must now be 64 bits
long rather than 80. The link-local prefix is also shortened to
64 bits.

9. Security Considerations

The method of derivation of Interface Identifiers from MAC addresses
is intended to preserve global uniqueness when possible. However,
there is no protection from duplication through accident or forgery.

10. References

[AARCH] Hinden, R. and S. Deering "IP Version 6 Addressing
Architecture", RFC 2373, July 1998.

[ACONF] Thomson, S. and T. Narten, "IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration", RFC 2462, December 1998.

[DISC] Narten, T., Nordmark, E. and W. Simpson, "Neighbor Discovery
for IP Version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 2461, December 1998.

[EUI64] "Guidelines For 64-bit Global Identifier (EUI-64)",
http://standards.ieee.org/db/oui/tutorials/EUI64.html

[IPV6] Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
(IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.

[RFC 2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

11. Author's Address

Matt Crawford
Fermilab MS 368
PO Box 500
Batavia, IL 60510
USA

Phone: +1 630 840-3461
EMail: crawdad@fnal.gov

12. Full Copyright Statement

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1998). All Rights Reserved.

This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are
included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this
document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
English.

The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.

This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
"AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.


RFC 1885 – Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for IPv6 (OBSOLETE)

 
Network Working Group             A. Conta, Digital Equipment Corporation
Request for Comments: 1885 S. Deering, Xerox PARC
Category: Standards Track December 1995

Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6)
for the Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
Specification

Status of this Memo

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

This document specifies a set of Internet Control Message Protocol
(ICMP) messages for use with version 6 of the Internet Protocol
(IPv6). The Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) messages
specified in STD 5, RFC 1112 have been merged into ICMP, for IPv6,
and are included in this document.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction........................................3

2. ICMPv6 (ICMP for IPv6)..............................3

2.1 Message General Format.......................3

2.2 Message Source Address Determination.........4

2.3 Message Checksum Calculation.................5

2.4 Message Processing Rules.....................5

3. ICMPv6 Error Messages...............................8

3.1 Destination Unreachable Message..............8

3.2 Packet Too Big Message......................10

3.3 Time Exceeded Message.......................11

3.4 Parameter Problem Message...................12

4. ICMPv6 Informational Messages......................14

4.1 Echo Request Message........................14

4.2 Echo Reply Message..........................15

4.3 Group Membership Messages...................17

5. References.........................................19

6. Acknowledgements...................................19

7. Security Considerations............................19

Authors' Addresses....................................20

1. Introduction

The Internet Protocol, version 6 (IPv6) is a new version of IP. IPv6
uses the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) as defined for IPv4
[RFC-792], with a number of changes. The Internet Group Membership
Protocol (IGMP) specified for IPv4 [RFC-1112] has also been revised
and has been absorbed into ICMP for IPv6. The resulting protocol is
called ICMPv6, and has an IPv6 Next Header value of 58.

This document describes the format of a set of control messages used
in ICMPv6. It does not describe the procedures for using these
messages to achieve functions like Path MTU discovery or multicast
group membership maintenance; such procedures are described in other
documents (e.g., [RFC-1112, RFC-1191]). Other documents may also
introduce additional ICMPv6 message types, such as Neighbor Discovery
messages [IPv6-DISC], subject to the general rules for ICMPv6
messages given in section 2 of this document.

Terminology defined in the IPv6 specification [IPv6] and the IPv6
Routing and Addressing specification [IPv6-ADDR] applies to this
document as well.

2. ICMPv6 (ICMP for IPv6)

ICMPv6 is used by IPv6 nodes to report errors encountered in
processing packets, and to perform other internet-layer functions,
such as diagnostics (ICMPv6 "ping") and multicast membership
reporting. ICMPv6 is an integral part of IPv6 and MUST be fully
implemented by every IPv6 node.

2.1 Message General Format

ICMPv6 messages are grouped into two classes: error messages and
informational messages. Error messages are identified as such by
having a zero in the high-order bit of their message Type field
values. Thus, error messages have message Types from 0 to 127;
informational messages have message Types from 128 to 255.

This document defines the message formats for the following ICMPv6
messages:

ICMPv6 error messages:

1 Destination Unreachable (see section 3.1)
2 Packet Too Big (see section 3.2)
3 Time Exceeded (see section 3.3)
4 Parameter Problem (see section 3.4)

ICMPv6 informational messages:

128 Echo Request (see section 4.1)
129 Echo Reply (see section 4.2)
130 Group Membership Query (see section 4.3)
131 Group Membership Report (see section 4.3)
132 Group Membership Reduction (see section 4.3)

Every ICMPv6 message is preceded by an IPv6 header and zero or more
IPv6 extension headers. The ICMPv6 header is identified by a Next
Header value of 58 in the immediately preceding header. (NOTE: this
is different than the value used to identify ICMP for IPv4.)

The ICMPv6 messages have the following general format:

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
+ Message Body +
| |

The type field indicates the type of the message. Its value
determines the format of the remaining data.

The code field depends on the message type. It is used to create an
additional level of message granularity.

The checksum field is used to detect data corruption in the ICMPv6
message and parts of the IPv6 header.

2.2 Message Source Address Determination

A node that sends an ICMPv6 message has to determine both the Source
and Destination IPv6 Addresses in the IPv6 header before calculating
the checksum. If the node has more than one unicast address, it must
choose the Source Address of the message as follows:

(a) If the message is a response to a message sent to one of the
node's unicast addresses, the Source Address of the reply must
be that same address.

(b) If the message is a response to a message sent to a multicast or
anycast group in which the node is a member, the Source Address
of the reply must be a unicast address belonging to the
interface on which the multicast or anycast packet was received.

(c) If the message is a response to a message sent to an address
that does not belong to the node, the Source Address should be
that unicast address belonging to the node that will be most
helpful in diagnosing the error. For example, if the message is
a response to a packet forwarding action that cannot complete
successfully, the Source Address should be a unicast address
belonging to the interface on which the packet forwarding
failed.

(d) Otherwise, the node's routing table must be examined to
determine which interface will be used to transmit the message
to its destination, and a unicast address belonging to that
interface must be used as the Source Address of the message.

2.3 Message Checksum Calculation

The checksum is the 16-bit one's complement of the one's complement
sum of the entire ICMPv6 message starting with the ICMPv6 message
type field, prepended with a "pseudo-header" of IPv6 header fields,
as specified in [IPv6, section 8.1]. The Next Header value used in
the pseudo-header is 58. (NOTE: the inclusion of a pseudo-header in
the ICMPv6 checksum is a change from IPv4; see [IPv6] for the
rationale for this change.)

For computing the checksum, the checksum field is set to zero.

2.4 Message Processing Rules

Implementations MUST observe the following rules when processing
ICMPv6 messages (from [RFC-1122]):

(a) If an ICMPv6 error message of unknown type is received, it MUST
be passed to the upper layer.

(b) If an ICMPv6 informational message of unknown type is received,
it MUST be silently discarded.

(c) Every ICMPv6 error message (type < 128) includes as much of the
IPv6 offending (invoking) packet (the packet that caused the
error) as will fit without making the error message packet
exceed 576 octets.

(d) In those cases where the internet-layer protocol is required to
pass an ICMPv6 error message to the upper-layer protocol, the
upper-layer protocol type is extracted from the original packet
(contained in the body of the ICMPv6 error message) and used to
select the appropriate upper-layer protocol entity to handle the
error.

If the original packet had an unusually large amount of
extension headers, it is possible that the upper-layer protocol
type may not be present in the ICMPv6 message, due to truncation
of the original packet to meet the 576-octet limit. In that
case, the error message is silently dropped after any IPv6-layer
processing.

(e) An ICMPv6 error message MUST NOT be sent as a result of
receiving:

(e.1) an ICMPv6 error message, or

(e.2) a packet destined to an IPv6 multicast address (there are
two exceptions to this rule: (1) the Packet Too Big
Message - Section 3.2 - to allow Path MTU discovery to
work for IPv6 multicast, and (2) the Parameter Problem
Message, Code 2 - Section 3.4 - reporting an unrecognized
IPv6 option that has the Option Type highest-order two
bits set to 10), or

(e.3) a packet sent as a link-layer multicast, (the exception
from e.2 applies to this case too), or

(e.4) a packet sent as a link-layer broadcast, (the exception
from e.2 applies to this case too), or

(e.5) a packet whose source address does not uniquely identify
a single node -- e.g., the IPv6 Unspecified Address, an
IPv6 multicast address, or an address known by the ICMP
message sender to be an IPv6 anycast address.

(f) Finally, to each sender of an erroneous data packet, an IPv6
node MUST limit the rate of ICMPv6 error messages sent, in order
to limit the bandwidth and forwarding costs incurred by the
error messages when a generator of erroneous packets does not
respond to those error messages by ceasing its transmissions.

There are a variety of ways of implementing the rate-limiting
function, for example:

(f.1) Timer-based - for example, limiting the rate of
transmission of error messages to a given source, or to
any source, to at most once every T milliseconds.

(f.2) Bandwidth-based - for example, limiting the rate at
which error messages are sent from a particular interface
to some fraction F of the attached link's bandwidth.

The limit parameters (e.g., T or F in the above examples) MUST
be configurable for the node, with a conservative default value
(e.g., T = 1 second, NOT 0 seconds, or F = 2 percent, NOT 100
percent).

The following sections describe the message formats for the above
ICMPv6 messages.

3. ICMPv6 Error Messages

3.1 Destination Unreachable Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Unused |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| As much of invoking packet |
+ as will fit without the ICMPv6 packet +
| exceeding 576 octets |

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

Copied from the Source Address field of the invoking
packet.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 1

Code 0 - no route to destination
1 - communication with destination
administratively prohibited
2 - not a neighbor
3 - address unreachable
4 - port unreachable

Unused This field is unused for all code values.
It must be initialized to zero by the sender
and ignored by the receiver.
Description

A Destination Unreachable message SHOULD be generated by a router, or
by the IPv6 layer in the originating node, in response to a packet
that cannot be delivered to its destination address for reasons other
than congestion. (An ICMPv6 message MUST NOT be generated if a
packet is dropped due to congestion.)

If the reason for the failure to deliver is lack of a matching entry
in the forwarding node's routing table, the Code field is set to 0
(NOTE: this error can occur only in nodes that do not hold a "default
route" in their routing tables).

If the reason for the failure to deliver is administrative
prohibition, e.g., a "firewall filter", the Code field is set to 1.

If the reason for the failure to deliver is that the next destination
address in the Routing header is not a neighbor of the processing
node but the "strict" bit is set for that address, then the Code
field is set to 2.

If there is any other reason for the failure to deliver, e.g.,
inability to resolve the IPv6 destination address into a
corresponding link address, or a link-specific problem of some sort,
then the Code field is set to 3.

A destination node SHOULD send a Destination Unreachable message with
Code 4 in response to a packet for which the transport protocol
(e.g., UDP) has no listener, if that transport protocol has no
alternative means to inform the sender.

Upper layer notification

A node receiving the ICMPv6 Destination Unreachable message MUST
notify the upper-layer protocol.

3.2 Packet Too Big Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| MTU |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| As much of invoking packet |
+ as will fit without the ICMPv6 packet +
| exceeding 576 octets |

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

Copied from the Source Address field of the invoking
packet.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 2

Code 0

MTU The Maximum Transmission Unit of the next-hop link.

Description

A Packet Too Big MUST be sent by a router in response to a packet
that it cannot forward because the packet is larger than the MTU of
the outgoing link. The information in this message is used as part
of the Path MTU Discovery process [RFC-1191].

Sending a Packet Too Big Message makes an exception to one of the
rules of when to send an ICMPv6 error message, in that unlike other
messages, it is sent in response to a packet received with an IPv6
multicast destination address, or a link-layer multicast or link-
layer broadcast address.

Upper layer notification

An incoming Packet Too Big message MUST be passed to the upper-layer
protocol.

3.3 Time Exceeded Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Unused |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| As much of invoking packet |
+ as will fit without the ICMPv6 packet +
| exceeding 576 octets |

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address
Copied from the Source Address field of the invoking
packet.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 3

Code 0 - hop limit exceeded in transit

1 - fragment reassembly time exceeded

Unused This field is unused for all code values.
It must be initialized to zero by the sender
and ignored by the receiver.

Description

If a router receives a packet with a Hop Limit of zero, or a router
decrements a packet's Hop Limit to zero, it MUST discard the packet
and send an ICMPv6 Time Exceeded message with Code 0 to the source of
the packet. This indicates either a routing loop or too small an
initial Hop Limit value.

The router sending an ICMPv6 Time Exceeded message with Code 0 SHOULD
consider the receiving interface of the packet as the interface on
which the packet forwarding failed in following rule (d) for
selecting the Source Address of the message.

Upper layer notification

An incoming Time Exceeded message MUST be passed to the upper-layer
protocol.

3.4 Parameter Problem Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Pointer |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| As much of invoking packet |
+ as will fit without the ICMPv6 packet +
| exceeding 576 octets |

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

Copied from the Source Address field of the invoking
packet.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 4

Code 0 - erroneous header field encountered

1 - unrecognized Next Header type encountered

2 - unrecognized IPv6 option encountered

Pointer Identifies the octet offset within the
invoking packet where the error was detected.

The pointer will point beyond the end of the ICMPv6
packet if the field in error is beyond what can fit
in the 576-byte limit of an ICMPv6 error message.

Description

If an IPv6 node processing a packet finds a problem with a field in
the IPv6 header or extension headers such that it cannot complete
processing the packet, it MUST discard the packet and SHOULD send an
ICMPv6 Parameter Problem message to the packet's source, indicating
the type and location of the problem.

The pointer identifies the octet of the original packet's header
where the error was detected. For example, an ICMPv6 message with
Type field = 4, Code field = 1, and Pointer field = 40 would indicate

that the IPv6 extension header following the IPv6 header of the
original packet holds an unrecognized Next Header field value.

Upper layer notification

A node receiving this ICMPv6 message MUST notify the upper-layer
protocol.

4. ICMPv6 Informational Messages

4.1 Echo Request Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Identifier | Sequence Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Data ...
+-+-+-+-+-

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

Any legal IPv6 address.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 128

Code 0

Identifier An identifier to aid in matching Echo Replies
to this Echo Request. May be zero.

Sequence Number

A sequence number to aid in matching Echo Replies
to this Echo Request. May be zero.

Data Zero or more octets of arbitrary data.

Description

Every node MUST implement an ICMPv6 Echo responder function that
receives Echo Requests and sends corresponding Echo Replies. A node
SHOULD also implement an application-layer interface for sending Echo
Requests and receiving Echo Replies, for diagnostic purposes.

Upper layer notification

A node receiving this ICMPv6 message MAY notify the upper-layer
protocol.

4.2 Echo Reply Message

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Identifier | Sequence Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Data ...
+-+-+-+-+-

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

Copied from the Source Address field of the invoking
Echo Request packet.

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 129

Code 0

Identifier The identifier from the invoking Echo Request message.

Sequence The sequence number from the invoking Echo Request
Number message.

Data The data from the invoking Echo Request message.

Description

Every node MUST implement an ICMPv6 Echo responder function that
receives Echo Requests and sends corresponding Echo Replies. A node
SHOULD also implement an application-layer interface for sending Echo
Requests and receiving Echo Replies, for diagnostic purposes.

The source address of an Echo Reply sent in response to a unicast
Echo Request message MUST be the same as the destination address of
that Echo Request message.

An Echo Reply SHOULD be sent in response to an Echo Request message
sent to an IPv6 multicast address. The source address of the reply
MUST be a unicast address belonging to the interface on which the
multicast Echo Request message was received.

The data received in the ICMPv6 Echo Request message MUST be returned
entirely and unmodified in the ICMPv6 Echo Reply message, unless the
Echo Reply would exceed the MTU of the path back to the Echo
requester, in which case the data is truncated to fit that path MTU.

Upper layer notification

Echo Reply messages MUST be passed to the ICMPv6 user interface,
unless the corresponding Echo Request originated in the IP layer.

4.3 Group Membership Messages

The ICMPv6 Group Membership Messages have the following format:

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Type | Code | Checksum |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Maximum Response Delay | Unused |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
+ +
| Multicast |
+ +
| Address |
+ +
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

IPv6 Fields:

Destination Address

In a Group Membership Query message, the multicast
address of the group being queried, or the Link-Local
All-Nodes multicast address.

In a Group Membership Report or a Group Membership
Reduction message, the multicast address of the
group being reported or terminated.

Hop Limit 1

ICMPv6 Fields:

Type 130 - Group Membership Query
131 - Group Membership Report
132 - Group Membership Reduction

Code 0

Maximum Response Delay

In Query messages, the maximum time that responding
Report messages may be delayed, in milliseconds.

In Report and Reduction messages, this field is
is initialized to zero by the sender and ignored by
receivers.

Unused Initialized to zero by the sender; ignored by receivers.

Multicast Address

The address of the multicast group about which the
message is being sent. In Query messages, the Multicast
Address field may be zero, implying a query for all
groups.

Description

The ICMPv6 Group Membership messages are used to convey information
about multicast group membership from nodes to their neighboring
routers. The details of their usage is given in [RFC-1112].

5. References

[IPv6] Deering, S., and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version
6, Specification", RFC 1883, Xerox PARC, Ipsilon
Networks, December 1995.

[IPv6-ADDR] Hinden, R., and S. Deering, Editors, "IP Version 6
Addressing Architecture", RFC 1884, Ipsilon Networks,
Xerox PARC, December 1995.

[IPv6-DISC] Narten, T., Nordmark, E., and W. Simpson, "Neighbor
Discovery for IP Version 6 (IPv6)", Work in Progress.

[RFC-792] Postel, J., "Internet Control Message Protocol", STD 5,
RFC 792, USC/Information Sciences Institute, September
1981.

[RFC-1112] Deering, S., "Host Extensions for IP Multicasting", STD
5, RFC 1112, Stanford University, August 1989.

[RFC-1122] Braden, R., "Requirements for Internet Hosts -
Communication Layers", STD 3, RFC 1122, USC/Information
Sciences Institute, October 1989.

[RFC-1191] Mogul, J., and S. Deering, "Path MTU Discovery", RFC
1191, DECWRL, Stanford University, November 1990.

6. Acknowledgements

The document is derived from previous ICMP drafts of the SIPP and
IPng working group.

The IPng working group and particularly Robert Elz, Jim Bound, Bill
Simpson, Thomas Narten, Charlie Lynn, Bill Fink, and Scott Bradner
(in chronological order) provided extensive review information and
feedback.

7. Security Considerations

Security issues are not discussed in this memo.

Authors' Addresses:

Alex Conta Stephen Deering
Digital Equipment Corporation Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
110 Spitbrook Rd 3333 Coyote Hill Road
Nashua, NH 03062 Palo Alto, CA 94304

Phone: +1-603-881-0744 Phone: +1-415-812-4839
EMail: conta@zk3.dec.com EMail: deering@parc.xerox.com


RFC 792 – Internet Control Message Protocol


Network Working Group                                          J. Postel
Request for Comments:  792                                           ISI
                                                          September 1981
Updates:  RFCs 777, 760
Updates:  IENs 109, 128

                   INTERNET CONTROL MESSAGE PROTOCOL

                         DARPA INTERNET PROGRAM
                         PROTOCOL SPECIFICATION

Introduction

   The Internet Protocol (IP) [1] is used for host-to-host datagram
   service in a system of interconnected networks called the
   Catenet [2].  The network connecting devices are called Gateways.
   These gateways communicate between themselves for control purposes
   via a Gateway to Gateway Protocol (GGP) [3,4].  Occasionally a
   gateway or destination host will communicate with a source host, for
   example, to report an error in datagram processing.  For such
   purposes this protocol, the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP),
   is used.  ICMP, uses the basic support of IP as if it were a higher
   level protocol, however, ICMP is actually an integral part of IP, and
   must be implemented by every IP module.

   ICMP messages are sent in several situations:  for example, when a
   datagram cannot reach its destination, when the gateway does not have
   the buffering capacity to forward a datagram, and when the gateway
   can direct the host to send traffic on a shorter route.

   The Internet Protocol is not designed to be absolutely reliable.  The
   purpose of these control messages is to provide feedback about
   problems in the communication environment, not to make IP reliable.
   There are still no guarantees that a datagram will be delivered or a
   control message will be returned.  Some datagrams may still be
   undelivered without any report of their loss.  The higher level
   protocols that use IP must implement their own reliability procedures
   if reliable communication is required.

   The ICMP messages typically report errors in the processing of
   datagrams.  To avoid the infinite regress of messages about messages
   etc., no ICMP messages are sent about ICMP messages.  Also ICMP
   messages are only sent about errors in handling fragment zero of
   fragemented datagrams.  (Fragment zero has the fragment offeset equal
   zero).

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Message Formats

   ICMP messages are sent using the basic IP header.  The first octet of
   the data portion of the datagram is a ICMP type field; the value of
   this field determines the format of the remaining data.  Any field
   labeled "unused" is reserved for later extensions and must be zero
   when sent, but receivers should not use these fields (except to
   include them in the checksum).  Unless otherwise noted under the
   individual format descriptions, the values of the internet header
   fields are as follows:

   Version

      4

   IHL

      Internet header length in 32-bit words.

   Type of Service

      0

   Total Length

      Length of internet header and data in octets.

   Identification, Flags, Fragment Offset

      Used in fragmentation, see [1].

   Time to Live

      Time to live in seconds; as this field is decremented at each
      machine in which the datagram is processed, the value in this
      field should be at least as great as the number of gateways which
      this datagram will traverse.

   Protocol

      ICMP = 1

   Header Checksum

      The 16 bit one's complement of the one's complement sum of all 16
      bit words in the header.  For computing the checksum, the checksum
      field should be zero.  This checksum may be replaced in the
      future.

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   Source Address

      The address of the gateway or host that composes the ICMP message.
      Unless otherwise noted, this can be any of a gateway's addresses.

   Destination Address

      The address of the gateway or host to which the message should be
      sent.

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Destination Unreachable Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                             unused                            |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |      Internet Header + 64 bits of Original Data Datagram      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Destination Address

      The source network and address from the original datagram's data.

   ICMP Fields:

   Type

      3

   Code

      0 = net unreachable;

      1 = host unreachable;

      2 = protocol unreachable;

      3 = port unreachable;

      4 = fragmentation needed and DF set;

      5 = source route failed.

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Internet Header + 64 bits of Data Datagram

      The internet header plus the first 64 bits of the original

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      datagram's data.  This data is used by the host to match the
      message to the appropriate process.  If a higher level protocol
      uses port numbers, they are assumed to be in the first 64 data
      bits of the original datagram's data.

   Description

      If, according to the information in the gateway's routing tables,
      the network specified in the internet destination field of a
      datagram is unreachable, e.g., the distance to the network is
      infinity, the gateway may send a destination unreachable message
      to the internet source host of the datagram.  In addition, in some
      networks, the gateway may be able to determine if the internet
      destination host is unreachable.  Gateways in these networks may
      send destination unreachable messages to the source host when the
      destination host is unreachable.

      If, in the destination host, the IP module cannot deliver the
      datagram  because the indicated protocol module or process port is
      not active, the destination host may send a destination
      unreachable message to the source host.

      Another case is when a datagram must be fragmented to be forwarded
      by a gateway yet the Don't Fragment flag is on.  In this case the
      gateway must discard the datagram and may return a destination
      unreachable message.

      Codes 0, 1, 4, and 5 may be received from a gateway.  Codes 2 and
      3 may be received from a host.

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Time Exceeded Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                             unused                            |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |      Internet Header + 64 bits of Original Data Datagram      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Destination Address

      The source network and address from the original datagram's data.

   ICMP Fields:

   Type

      11

   Code

      0 = time to live exceeded in transit;

      1 = fragment reassembly time exceeded.

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Internet Header + 64 bits of Data Datagram

      The internet header plus the first 64 bits of the original
      datagram's data.  This data is used by the host to match the
      message to the appropriate process.  If a higher level protocol
      uses port numbers, they are assumed to be in the first 64 data
      bits of the original datagram's data.

   Description

      If the gateway processing a datagram finds the time to live field

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      is zero it must discard the datagram.  The gateway may also notify
      the source host via the time exceeded message.

      If a host reassembling a fragmented datagram cannot complete the
      reassembly due to missing fragments within its time limit it
      discards the datagram, and it may send a time exceeded message.

      If fragment zero is not available then no time exceeded need be
      sent at all.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway.  Code 1 may be received
      from a host.

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Parameter Problem Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |    Pointer    |                   unused                      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |      Internet Header + 64 bits of Original Data Datagram      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Destination Address

      The source network and address from the original datagram's data.

   ICMP Fields:

   Type

      12

   Code

      0 = pointer indicates the error.

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Pointer

      If code = 0, identifies the octet where an error was detected.

   Internet Header + 64 bits of Data Datagram

      The internet header plus the first 64 bits of the original
      datagram's data.  This data is used by the host to match the
      message to the appropriate process.  If a higher level protocol
      uses port numbers, they are assumed to be in the first 64 data
      bits of the original datagram's data.

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   Description

      If the gateway or host processing a datagram finds a problem with
      the header parameters such that it cannot complete processing the
      datagram it must discard the datagram.  One potential source of
      such a problem is with incorrect arguments in an option.  The
      gateway or host may also notify the source host via the parameter
      problem message.  This message is only sent if the error caused
      the datagram to be discarded.

      The pointer identifies the octet of the original datagram's header
      where the error was detected (it may be in the middle of an
      option).  For example, 1 indicates something is wrong with the
      Type of Service, and (if there are options present) 20 indicates
      something is wrong with the type code of the first option.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway or a host.

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Source Quench Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                             unused                            |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |      Internet Header + 64 bits of Original Data Datagram      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Destination Address

      The source network and address of the original datagram's data.

   ICMP Fields:

   Type

      4

   Code

      0

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Internet Header + 64 bits of Data Datagram

      The internet header plus the first 64 bits of the original
      datagram's data.  This data is used by the host to match the
      message to the appropriate process.  If a higher level protocol
      uses port numbers, they are assumed to be in the first 64 data
      bits of the original datagram's data.

   Description

      A gateway may discard internet datagrams if it does not have the
      buffer space needed to queue the datagrams for output to the next
      network on the route to the destination network.  If a gateway

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      discards a datagram, it may send a source quench message to the
      internet source host of the datagram.  A destination host may also
      send a source quench message if datagrams arrive too fast to be
      processed.  The source quench message is a request to the host to
      cut back the rate at which it is sending traffic to the internet
      destination.  The gateway may send a source quench message for
      every message that it discards.  On receipt of a source quench
      message, the source host should cut back the rate at which it is
      sending traffic to the specified destination until it no longer
      receives source quench messages from the gateway.  The source host
      can then gradually increase the rate at which it sends traffic to
      the destination until it again receives source quench messages.

      The gateway or host may send the source quench message when it
      approaches its capacity limit rather than waiting until the
      capacity is exceeded.  This means that the data datagram which
      triggered the source quench message may be delivered.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway or a host.

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RFC 792

Redirect Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |                 Gateway Internet Address                      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |      Internet Header + 64 bits of Original Data Datagram      |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Destination Address

      The source network and address of the original datagram's data.

   ICMP Fields:

   Type

      5

   Code

      0 = Redirect datagrams for the Network.

      1 = Redirect datagrams for the Host.

      2 = Redirect datagrams for the Type of Service and Network.

      3 = Redirect datagrams for the Type of Service and Host.

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Gateway Internet Address

      Address of the gateway to which traffic for the network specified
      in the internet destination network field of the original
      datagram's data should be sent.

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   Internet Header + 64 bits of Data Datagram

      The internet header plus the first 64 bits of the original
      datagram's data.  This data is used by the host to match the
      message to the appropriate process.  If a higher level protocol
      uses port numbers, they are assumed to be in the first 64 data
      bits of the original datagram's data.

   Description

      The gateway sends a redirect message to a host in the following
      situation.  A gateway, G1, receives an internet datagram from a
      host on a network to which the gateway is attached.  The gateway,
      G1, checks its routing table and obtains the address of the next
      gateway, G2, on the route to the datagram's internet destination
      network, X.  If G2 and the host identified by the internet source
      address of the datagram are on the same network, a redirect
      message is sent to the host.  The redirect message advises the
      host to send its traffic for network X directly to gateway G2 as
      this is a shorter path to the destination.  The gateway forwards
      the original datagram's data to its internet destination.

      For datagrams with the IP source route options and the gateway
      address in the destination address field, a redirect message is
      not sent even if there is a better route to the ultimate
      destination than the next address in the source route.

      Codes 0, 1, 2, and 3 may be received from a gateway.

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Echo or Echo Reply Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |           Identifier          |        Sequence Number        |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Data ...
   +-+-+-+-+-

   IP Fields:

   Addresses

      The address of the source in an echo message will be the
      destination of the echo reply message.  To form an echo reply
      message, the source and destination addresses are simply reversed,
      the type code changed to 0, and the checksum recomputed.

   IP Fields:

   Type

      8 for echo message;

      0 for echo reply message.

   Code

      0

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      If the total length is odd, the received data is padded with one
      octet of zeros for computing the checksum.  This checksum may be
      replaced in the future.

   Identifier

      If code = 0, an identifier to aid in matching echos and replies,
      may be zero.

   Sequence Number

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RFC 792

      If code = 0, a sequence number to aid in matching echos and
      replies, may be zero.

   Description

      The data received in the echo message must be returned in the echo
      reply message.

      The identifier and sequence number may be used by the echo sender
      to aid in matching the replies with the echo requests.  For
      example, the identifier might be used like a port in TCP or UDP to
      identify a session, and the sequence number might be incremented
      on each echo request sent.  The echoer returns these same values
      in the echo reply.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway or a host.

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Timestamp or Timestamp Reply Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |      Code     |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |           Identifier          |        Sequence Number        |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Originate Timestamp                                       |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Receive Timestamp                                         |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Transmit Timestamp                                        |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Addresses

      The address of the source in a timestamp message will be the
      destination of the timestamp reply message.  To form a timestamp
      reply message, the source and destination addresses are simply
      reversed, the type code changed to 14, and the checksum
      recomputed.

   IP Fields:

   Type

      13 for timestamp message;

      14 for timestamp reply message.

   Code

      0

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Identifier

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      If code = 0, an identifier to aid in matching timestamp and
      replies, may be zero.

   Sequence Number

      If code = 0, a sequence number to aid in matching timestamp and
      replies, may be zero.

   Description

      The data received (a timestamp) in the message is returned in the
      reply together with an additional timestamp.  The timestamp is 32
      bits of milliseconds since midnight UT.  One use of these
      timestamps is described by Mills [5].

      The Originate Timestamp is the time the sender last touched the
      message before sending it, the Receive Timestamp is the time the
      echoer first touched it on receipt, and the Transmit Timestamp is
      the time the echoer last touched the message on sending it.

      If the time is not available in miliseconds or cannot be provided
      with respect to midnight UT then any time can be inserted in a
      timestamp provided the high order bit of the timestamp is also set
      to indicate this non-standard value.

      The identifier and sequence number may be used by the echo sender
      to aid in matching the replies with the requests.  For example,
      the identifier might be used like a port in TCP or UDP to identify
      a session, and the sequence number might be incremented on each
      request sent.  The destination returns these same values in the
      reply.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway or a host.

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Information Request or Information Reply Message

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |      Code     |          Checksum             |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |           Identifier          |        Sequence Number        |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   IP Fields:

   Addresses

      The address of the source in a information request message will be
      the destination of the information reply message.  To form a
      information reply message, the source and destination addresses
      are simply reversed, the type code changed to 16, and the checksum
      recomputed.

   IP Fields:

   Type

      15 for information request message;

      16 for information reply message.

   Code

      0

   Checksum

      The checksum is the 16-bit ones's complement of the one's
      complement sum of the ICMP message starting with the ICMP Type.
      For computing the checksum , the checksum field should be zero.
      This checksum may be replaced in the future.

   Identifier

      If code = 0, an identifier to aid in matching request and replies,
      may be zero.

   Sequence Number

      If code = 0, a sequence number to aid in matching request and
      replies, may be zero.

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RFC 792

   Description

      This message may be sent with the source network in the IP header
      source and destination address fields zero (which means "this"
      network).  The replying IP module should send the reply with the
      addresses fully specified.  This message is a way for a host to
      find out the number of the network it is on.

      The identifier and sequence number may be used by the echo sender
      to aid in matching the replies with the requests.  For example,
      the identifier might be used like a port in TCP or UDP to identify
      a session, and the sequence number might be incremented on each
      request sent.  The destination returns these same values in the
      reply.

      Code 0 may be received from a gateway or a host.

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                                                          September 1981
RFC 792

Summary of Message Types

    0  Echo Reply

    3  Destination Unreachable

    4  Source Quench

    5  Redirect

    8  Echo

   11  Time Exceeded

   12  Parameter Problem

   13  Timestamp

   14  Timestamp Reply

   15  Information Request

   16  Information Reply

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RFC 792

References

   [1]  Postel, J. (ed.), "Internet Protocol - DARPA Internet Program
         Protocol Specification," RFC 791, USC/Information Sciences
         Institute, September 1981.

   [2]   Cerf, V., "The Catenet Model for Internetworking," IEN 48,
         Information Processing Techniques Office, Defense Advanced
         Research Projects Agency, July 1978.

   [3]   Strazisar, V., "Gateway Routing:  An Implementation
         Specification", IEN 30, Bolt Beranek and Newman, April 1979.

   [4]   Strazisar, V., "How to Build a Gateway", IEN 109, Bolt Beranek
         and Newman, August 1979.

   [5]   Mills, D., "DCNET Internet Clock Service," RFC 778, COMSAT
         Laboratories, April 1981.