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Asia Pacific spending on technologies enabling smart city initiatives to reach US$30bn in 2018, says IDC

By Anasia D’mello

The latest update of the IDC Worldwide Semiannual Smart Cities Spending Guide expects spending on technologies that enable Smart Cities initiatives to reach a value amounting to USD $30 billion (€26.10 billion) in 2018 for Asia/Pacific excluding Japan (APeJ).

IDC provides a detailed view at the technology investments associated with a range of Smart City priorities and use cases. As these initiatives gain traction, IDC spending will continue to accelerate over the 2017-22 forecast period, reaching USD $54.4 billion (€47.32 billion) in 2022.

Fixed Usual Surveillance, Advanced Public Transit, Intelligent Traffic Management and Smart Outdoor Lighting use cases are seeing maximum impetus, representing more than 35% share of the overall spending in 2018 from USD $25.86 Billion (€22.49) in 2017. However, over the forecast period (2017-22), fastest growing use cases will be in Vehicle to Everything (V2X) Connectivity and Officer Wearables (Fitbit/smart glasses) use cases at a five-year CAGR of 44.4% and 36.9% respectively.

“Cities in the Asia Pacific are challenged to continually deliver smart, livable, and sustainable urban ecosystems by harnessing technology innovations and widespread collaborations. This also requires clarity around implementation policies that are focused on the building and financing of city infrastructures as well as new city digital services in the long-term,” shares Gerald Wang, head of public sector at IDC Asia/Pacific.

“City governments need to continually analyse the impact of rapid advances in technologies on city transformation goals and create outcome-based metrics for future smart city investments. This approach requires a rethink of the way governments traditionally procure for technologies and innovative solutions.”

Hardware continue to account for the highest spending with 38.1% share of the overall spending in 2018 but the trend is likely to observe a linear growth of 14.4% over a five-year CAGR, thus reaching USD $19.4 billion (€16.88 billion) by 2022. Services is the second largest technology spend at USD $8.9 billion (€7.74 billion), followed by Software and Connectivity in 2018.

Over the forecast period (2017-22), Services is expected to grow the fastest at a five-year CAGR of 18.4%. The growth in Services and Hardware will be mostly driven by State/Local Government segment, with the maximum usage of Fixed Visual Surveillance and Smart Outdoor Lighting use cases. These use cases attract considerable investment across the region.

Fixed Visual Surveillance will be the leading use case in China, accounting for 17.3% of China spending in 2018. This is due to the increasing demand for video information sources to track down the movement of citizens. Consequently, huge investment is expected in surveillance and facial recognition coverage across the country.

China has deployed around 20 million security cameras, facilitated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology to locate and track criminals China will complete building its facial recognition and surveillance network nationwide, attaining nearly overall surveillance of urban residents including their homes through smartphones and smart TVs by 2020.

“Data-Driven Public Safety and Intelligent Transportation are the two priority investments centered around the region in response to growing urban population,” said Malini Swamy, market analyst at IDC Asia/Pacific. “However, we are also finding significant spending and growth in platform […]

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IDC Canada projects Smart Cities spending in Canada to reach C$2.8 bn in 2022

By Anasia D’mello

Smart City initiatives in Canada will attract technology investments of more than C$1.4 billion (€0.93 billion) in 2018, and spending is set to grow to C$2.8 billion (€1.87 billion) in 2022, according to the new release of the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Semiannual Smart Cities Spending Guide. The Spending Guide provides a detailed look at the technology investments associated with a range of Smart Cities priorities, programmes, and use cases.

“The three largest use cases, which will attract over one fifth of total Canadian Smart Cities spending in 2018, are fixed visual surveillance, smart outdoor lighting, and advanced public transit. By 2022, however, intelligent traffic management will overcome fixed visual surveillance and jump up to first position.”

“Vehicle to everything (V2X) connectivity and Next-Gen Emergency PSAPs will generate the fastest growth at 90.0% and 66.3% CAGR respectively although they currently start from a small base,” says Nigel Wallis, IoT & Industries research vice president at IDC Canada.

Spending by the 53 Cities that are currently sized in IDC’s database among which three come from Canada—Toronto, Vancouver and Alberta. IDC Canada Measurement and Forecasting analyst Meng Cong notes “The Smart Cities spending in these three cities account for over one fifth of the total Smart City investments in Canada.”

IDC’s Worldwide Semiannual Smart Cities Spending Guide quantifies the expected technology opportunity around smart cities initiatives from a region and worldwide level. Spending data is available for nine regions with a focus on 25 use cases across five strategic priorities, as well as the overall Smart Cities market size.

Starting from the current release, the spending guide offers a complementary Cities database, providing Smart City 2018 spending for over 50 cities across nine regions. The spending guide is designed to provide IT vendors with insights into this rapidly growing market and how the market will develop over the five-year forecast period. For more detail on IDC’s definition of the overall Smart Cities opportunity and select use cases, see IDC’s Worldwide Semiannual Smart Cities Spending Guide Taxonomy, 2H17.

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Cybersecurity breaches to result in over 146 bn records being stolen by 2023

By Anasia D’mello

A new report by Juniper Research found that over 33 billion records will be stolen by cyber criminals in 2023 alone, an increase of 175% over the 12 billion records expected to be compromised in 2018, resulting in cumulative loss of over 146 billion records for the whole period.

The new research, The Future of Cybercrime & Security: Threat Analysis, Impact Assessment & Leading Vendors 2018-2023, found that, in spite of legislation like GDPR and PSD2 mandating strong cybersecurity and authentication measures to protect personal and financial data, average levels of cybersecurity spend will remain relatively static.

Small business continues to be vulnerable

Spend by small businesses in 2018 will only make up 13% of the overall cybersecurity market in 2018, despite over 99% of all companies being small businesses. In addition, the cost of breaches can exceed millions of dollars, dwarfing the turnover of such businesses.

Many of these companies use consumer-grade products, spending on average under $500 (€433.93) per year on cybersecurity. With many such businesses digitising, this will leave them vulnerable to newer forms of malware which require more advanced cybersecurity, beyond simple endpoint protection.

“Juniper’s strategic analysis of 48 cybersecurity companies shows that AI and predictive analytics are now table stakes for this market”, remarked research author James Moar. “These technologies need to be made available to all businesses, regardless of size”.

Threats coalesce in the US

Additionally, the research found that the US will become a more prominent target over the next 5 years. Juniper expects over half of all data breaches globally to occur in the US by 2023. This is because the country has much national and international consumer and corporate data in a disparate range of institutions and regulations; making it easier to find and exploit systemic weaknesses.

Juniper Research provides research and analytical services to the global hi-tech communications sector, providing consultancy, analyst reports and industry commentary.

For more insights on the future of cybercrime, download our free whitepaper: Cybercrime & the Internet of Threats 2018.

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Resistance is futile – Protecting your company from non-compliance with data protection regulations

By Anasia D’mello

May 25, 2018 came and went, leaving many companies unprepared for the level of compliance that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requires. Even with four years notice, IT technologists responsible for business resilience strategies are still struggling to add new sophistications to the list of data protection goals. Syncsort’s 2018 State of Resilience Report shows that security and data privacy concerns are top of mind for most IT departments, especially as they adopt cloud platforms to gather, store and analyse data, says David Hodgson, chief product officer, Syncsort .

The long arm of the law

According to the GDPR authors, “the processing of personal data should be designed to serve mankind.” GDPR builds on and replaces the earlier data protection directive 95/46/EC and was primarily designed to unify and standardise data privacy laws across Europe. But, it raises the data privacy bar for organisations both inside the region and those outside wishing to do business with EU countries.

Bottom line: it would behoove any company, anywhere, to reconsider its data management practices in the light of GDPR. Do you know what data you have, about whom, how that is used by you or shared with others? Is it properly secured against theft? The same survey, with nearly 6,000 global respondents, found that most companies are still grappling these issues.

Putting the individual back in charge

GDPR ensures an individual’s right to know a company is keeping personal data on them, what that data is, the right to inspect and correct it and, most significantly, the right to have it removed, or the right to be forgotten.

The new approach starts with the right of consent. Many individuals have experienced this personally with companies sending emails to confirm approval to keep personal data. Certainly, as much as data is the fuel for many new business models, data is now also the new banana-skin that may cause a few slip-ups.

The first step is to clearly track what data you have, about whom and to confirm consent. A key part of this is unifying your view of an individual across different systems, databases and data sources. Is David Hodgson the same as David M Hodgson or are these two different people? To achieve this visibility, ensure you have the proper tools that can deliver and maintain data integrity.

Data quality tools that can both identify personal data and help keep it accurate, clean and de-duped are all essential to achieve compliance. Equally important is the ability to maintain an audit trail of who has accessed personal data. However, these requirements are only made harder in the realms of big data and streaming data.

What is personal data and how can it be used safely?

The spread of data gathering practices that routinely individualise our online experiences have underpinned the Digital Revolution, but it has also driven the concerns that have led to GDPR.

Article 4(1) of the GDPR defines Personally Identifiable Information (PII) as data that identifies, describes, or is unique to an individual. This includes the obvious – name, age, and social […]

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