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Ditch Linux for Windows 10 on your Raspberry Pi with Microsoft’s IoT kit

While those interested in running Microsoft’s Windows 10 IoT Core—its free OS for hobbyist boards like the Raspberry Pi 2 and MinnowBoard Max—will likely have the chops to put together their own custom hardware configuration, the company wants to give newbies a helping hand. Microsoft has partnered with Adafruit to release the Windows IoT Core Starter Kit, which gives users everything they need to get started with IoT development.

The $75 (~£50) kit comes comes complete with an SD card preloaded with Windows 10 IoT Core, a Raspberry Pi 2 case, full size 40-pin breadboard, miniature WiFi module, BMP280 environmental sensor, RGB colour sensor, eight channel 10-Bit ADC with SPI interface, and a whole host of different resistors and LEDs. Those who needed Raspberry Pi 2 can pick up a $114.95 (~£70) with one included. A full list of the included components is below.

  • 8GB class 10 SD/MicroSD Memory Card w/ Windows 10 IOT Core
  • Adafruit Raspberry Pi B+ Case
  • Full Size Breadboard
  • Premium Male/Male Jumper Wires
  • Premium Female/Male ‘Extension’ Jumper Wires
  • Miniature WiFi Module
  • 5V 2A Switching Power Supply
  • Assembled Adafruit BMP280 Temperature & Humidity sensor
  • Assembled TCS34725 RGB Color Sensor
  • MCP3008 – 8 Channel 10-Bit ADC With SPI Interface
  • 1x Photo Cell
  • 2x Breadboard Trim Potentiometer
  • 5x 10K 5% 1/4W Resistor
  • 5x 560 ohm 5% 1/4W Resistor
  • 1x Diffused 10mm Blue LED
  • 1x Electrolytic Capacitor – 1.0uF
  • 1x Diffused 10mm Red LED
  • 1x Diffused 10mm Green LED
  • 3x 12mm Tactile Switches

Microsoft is hoping that kit, along with some free sample code, will encourage users to ditch Linux on their IoT projects in favour of Windows 10. While that’s a big ask, the company has been heavily courting the hobbyist community of late. Earlier this year, Microsoft revealed that it was bringing Windows 10 to the ever popular Arduino microcontroller boards, starting with the release of two open source libraries that connect Arduinos to Windows 10 devices.

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The ‘Internet of Things’ and Clinical Research: Privacy, Security and Ethical Aspects, New Webinar

As the first of its 2015 Advanced Thought in Clinical Research series, Chesapeake IRB will host a panel of experts to examine issues surrounding the “Internet of Things” in clinical research. The 90-minute broadcast is Monday, Sep.28, 2015, 11am EDT (4pm BST/ UK GMT +1). The “Internet of Things” is a vision of the future…

The post The ‘Internet of Things’ and Clinical Research: Privacy, Security and Ethical Aspects, New Webinar appeared first on IoT.do.

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Sponsored post: 5 Ways that Support can Save the IoT

We’ve all heard the numbers: between 35 billion and 220 billion devices hooked up to the Internet of Things (IoT) by 2020; $1.4 trillion USD in annual sales. The pace of progress is dizzying. Competition frenzied. Opportunities unlimited. And bumps in the road are already showing up.

Approximately 30-40% of consumers trying to install home automation run into problems, and it’s twice that rate for first-timers. The majority of all consumer electronics returned for refund are in perfect working order – the devices were just too hard to install or use – and, to top it off, the demand for home automation actually dropped in the first six months of 2015.

The good news? A revised approach to support can stop that backlash. To do so, support has to move away from waiting for things to break and then fixing them, and morph into helping consumers realize value from their technology purchases.

We’ve identified five specific “imperatives” to help the metamorphosis:

  1. Provide support throughout the customer’s entire experience of the product
  2. Design the product with support in mind
  3. Make support a natural part of product usage, not a separate experience
  4. Provide contextual guided assistance to both support personnel and customers
  5. Gather data aggressively and optimize continually, on both the service and the product sides

For a full description of each of these, I invite you to download Support.com’s IoT white paper, “New Rules for a New World: Five Support Imperatives That Can Save the Internet of Things.”

Lee Gruenfeld is Vice President, Strategic Initiatives at Support.com, makers of Nexus® cloud software that optimizes support for professionals and self-service users. He is responsible for long-range technology and service strategies, including the company’s IoT positioning.

Copyright © 2015 Support.com, Inc. Support.com, the Support.com logo and Nexus are trademarks or registered trademarks of Support.com, Inc. in the United States and other countries.

Sponsored post: 5 Ways that Support can Save the IoT originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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LTE standard for Internet of Things machines gets the green light

By Stephen Lawson

The international body in charge of LTE will standardize a version of that technology specifically for the Internet of Things, taking on rival systems for connecting low-power equipment like parking meters and industrial sensors.

At a workshop last week in Phoenix, members of the 3GPP agreed to define a standard for NB-IoT (NarrowBand IoT), which would be based on the dominant global cellular system but tuned for devices that typically rely on batteries and only send small amounts of information.

NB-IoT will be one of several technologies designed for low speed but long reach, key criteria for IoT networks. Devices like sensors and industrial equipment often are set up to operate for years in isolation with no service visits. Nearly 1.5 million devices will be connected to these so-called LPWA (low-power wide-area) networks by 2020, according to Machina Research.

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Eurotech releases v3.1 of its Java-OSGi Framework for M2M gateways, smart devices and IoT applications

Eurotech, a leading supplier of embedded technologies, products and systems, announced the official release of ESF 3.1, the Java OSGi software framework for M2M multiservice gateways and smart devices. ESF offers a development environment for Java programmers that radically simplify the creation and remote management of embedded applications. ESF provides a set of common services […]

The post Eurotech releases v3.1 of its Java-OSGi Framework for M2M gateways, smart devices and IoT applications appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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LTE standard for machines gets the green light

By Stephen Lawson

The international body in charge of LTE will standardize a version of that technology specifically for the Internet of Things, taking on rival systems for connecting low-power equipment like parking meters and industrial sensors.

At a workshop last week in Phoenix, members of the 3GPP agreed to define a standard for NB-IoT (NarrowBand IoT), which would be based on the dominant global cellular system but tuned for devices that typically rely on batteries and only send small amounts of information.

NB-IoT will be one of several technologies designed for low speed but long reach, key criteria for IoT networks. Devices like sensors and industrial equipment often are set up to operate for years in isolation with no service visits. Nearly 1.5 million devices will be connected to these so-called LPWA (low-power wide-area) networks by 2020, according to Machina Research.

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OriginGPS gets $1.75m funding and partners with Flex to add miniature GNSS modules to IoT devices

OriginGPS, a manufacturer of miniature Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) solutions, has closed US$1.75 million of funding from existing shareholders and the technology accelerator, Lab IX. Lab IX is a part of Flex, a sketch-to-scaleT solutions company that designs and builds intelligent products for a connected world. Drawing on its decade of experience, OriginGPS has […]

The post OriginGPS gets $1.75m funding and partners with Flex to add miniature GNSS modules to IoT devices appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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Ten Years of Secure DNS at .se! (What We Learned)

By Anne-Marie Eklund Löwinder

Ten years ago today, and with 300,000 domains in the zone file, we introduced DNSSEC at .se. It was the end of a fairly long journey, or at least the first stage. The first Swedish workshop to test the new function according to the specifications from the Internet Engineering Task Force was arranged in 1999. At that time, I was still working in the IT Commission’s Secretariat, and the standard was far from complete as it turned out. Our ambition was to change the world, at least the world that exists on the internet.

(This is a translated blog post. You can find the Swedish version here.)

* * *

False DNS information creates the risk of leading email traffic to an undesired location, to steal information or disturb the transaction. For example, if a user wants a specific website, false DNS information makes the user go to a different website that can have false content or fraudulently entice the user to give sensitive information by representing someone other than the bank, tax authority, social insurance, or anything else. The DNS world knew this earlier but it took many years to produce an antidote. The answer to the question turned out to be DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC), which makes it possible to detect the use of manipulated and falsified information from name servers through the use of digital signatures.

The fact that we were first that made it, we also had to invent all the wheels on our own. Well aware that we would be seen as role models for the rest of the world, we were very careful to document and make the transition in a controlled manner. Starting September 13th, we delivered a signed zone file to one operator each day. The idea behind this gradual process was that we would be able to handle any problems without time pressure. During a short transition period, NIC-SE, which we called it at the time, distributed both an unsigned and a signed version of the .se zone from our distribution points. Everything went through without problems and on September 16th we were finished with the transition.

The Swedish top-level domain was the first top-level domain in the world to introduce DNSSEC. However, it was not enough that the .se zone could handle DNSSEC. Name servers for underlying domains and the users name server that handled the lookup of names to the IP addresses, the so-called resolver, had to also be able to handle the technology. Through the years, we have had many efforts to persuade them to do this.

The supervising authority PTS has been very supportive of the work and they decided early on to test how hard it would be to implement DNSSEC. The result of tests carried out showed that the introduction of DNSSEC was generally simple to implement for name server operators. What was missing was automated and standardized tools for key generating and zone signing, which were important for the use of DNSSEC to take off and that the increased manual work would not negate the increased security that DNSSEC otherwise brought.

So here we are ten years later and the .se zone has grown to 1,257,830 domains of which 585,088 are signed. Most internet operators in Sweden validate answers signed with DNSSEC. DNSSEC is still the way to go to achieve increased trust in the DNS service and thus the internet. Today there are 895 top-level domains signed with DNSSEC.

Expensive? No.

There is free software for signing. An upgrade of one’s own IT environment must be done sometimes anyway. Take the opportunity when it happens and it won’t be so burdensome. There is well spread DNS software that supports validation. It takes only slightly more hardware and does not require much additional care.

Difficult? Nah.

It’s not hard to start signing, but it does require a little order in the IT environment, of course. It is also not difficult to start validating, but it requires more knowledge to understand and debug. With DNSSEC, troubleshooting is more difficult than traditional DNS.

What have we learned?

That we poked at an anthill and eventually by every means of persuasion, we got more and more registrars to sign customer domains revealing weaknesses and shortcomings in the available software, something that benefits everyone.

We learned that the carrot must be fairly juicy to attract registrars, so we introduced the opportunity to receive compensation for every registered domain provided they responded properly to DNS queries.

Our work with DNSSEC has given us experience — both internal and for others who work with DNSSEC; developers, registers, registrars and internet operators.

Are we done yet?

Signing of DNS with DNSSEC is only the beginning. Something we quickly found was that the signing of the domain name system with DNSSEC created a great distribution channel for other security attributes. One example is the recently accepted standard Domain-based Authentication of Named Entities (DANE).

To blindly trust a large number of Certificate Authorities (CA) as we do today because they are pre-installed in, for example, browsers is stupid. A CA, who suffered an infringement or is simply an evil person, can issue certificates for any domain. We have seen many examples that have occurred over the past 2-3 years. DANE makes it possible for domain administrators to certify the keys used in the domain’s TLS clients and servers through storing them in DNS. This also allows DANE domain holders to specify which CA is allowed to issue certificates for any domain.

There is still a need for work to convince more registrars, for still not all registrars have signed either their own or their clients’ zones. There continues to be a need to work to convince more domain holders, above all those representing important society functions.

We thought earlier, perhaps naively, that all important functions in society would find that DNSSEC was the way to go to protect their users and customers. We could not have been more wrong. If we take Swedish banks, they are not all on track. Most municipalities are signed, but of those who are signed, not everything has been done right when it comes to DNS operations. 65 of 217 government agencies have signed their domains also with mixed results.

Patience is a virtue. I have plenty of that commodity. I think that more people will discover the need for DNSSEC. If you want to know more about what is happening in the world, ISOC has much information. Please contact us if there is something you have missed or that you think IIS can contribute to when it comes to further development of a secure internet.

Written by Anne-Marie Eklund Löwinder, Head of Security at .SE

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Can CSPs build the quintuple play by partnering with utilities on smart metering?–Part 1

According to new research from IDC, the worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) market will grow from US$655.8 billion in 2014 to US$1.7 trillion in 2020, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%. As the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and IoT markets continue this upward trajectory, one market with potential for strong growth is smart metering, […]

The post Can CSPs build the quintuple play by partnering with utilities on smart metering?–Part 1 appeared first on M2M Now – News and expert opinions on the M2M industry, machine to machine magazine.

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55 Days Remain Until the 10th Internet Governance Forum in Joao Pessoa, Brazil

By Janis Karklins

On behalf of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) I would like to extend the official invitation from the United Nations Secretary-General which cordially invites and encourages all stakeholders to participate in the upcoming 10th annual meeting of the Internet Governance Forum, being held this year in the beautiful coastal city of João Pessoa, Brazil.

IGF 2015 takes place at a turning point in the history of Internet governance. The ten-year review of the WSIS is an opportunity to set a forward-looking vision for the Information Society, but also to discuss the renewal of the IGF’s mandate. Furthermore, with the Sustainable Development Summit, this year offers a unique opportunity for the community to articulate the value of ICTs and the Internet in supporting a people-centric and development oriented Information Society. Many of these issues will be at the heart of the IGF’s discussions.

Towards IGF 2015 Outputs

This year some innovative processes are under way, leading to tangible outputs:

‘Policy Options for Connecting the Next Billion’ exercise, which aims to create better synergies and create linkages between the IGF and National and Regional IGF initiatives that are mushrooming around the world. The process that has been put in place by the MAG strives to produce a community driven, bottom-up developed IGF output. It is direct response to the recommendation of the UN CSTD Working Group on improvements of IGF that called for more tangible outcomes from IGF. Information on how to contribute to this initiative in a variety of ways can be found here.

IGF Best Practice Forums (BPFs) are working to produce diverse outputs intended to become robust resources, to serve as inputs into other pertinent forums, and to evolve and grow over time on the subjects of:

  1. Developing meaningful multistakeholder participation mechanisms,
  2. Regulation and mitigation of unsolicited communications (e.g. “spam”),
  3. Establishing and supporting Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRT) for Internet security, IV. Practice to counter abuse against women online,
  4. Creating an Enabling Environment for IPv6 Adoption,
  5. Enabling Environments for Establishing successful IXPs.

All interested individuals and organizations are invited to join this community driven work. Information on how to join and participate in the BPFs can be found here.

IGF Dynamic Coalitions, some of which have been working since the first IGF in 2006, and others who have just began their work on important and emerging issues related to Internet Governance, are open to all interested stakeholders. This year some of the IGF Dynamic Coalitions will be presenting their work to the broader IGF community in a dedicated main session. This work will be available for public comment leading up to the IGF.

Presence of the UN General Assembly President (or his representative), as well as review co-facilitators (ambassadors of Latvia and UAE to UN in NYC) at the IGF, will provide significant relevance to this multistakeholder engagement.

Registration is now open via the IGF website. More than 1,000 representatives from Governments, private sector, civil society and the technical community, have already registered. Thousands more are expected to join both in person and through online participation. Newcomers and first-time IGF participants are also encouraged to participate in the work of IGF.

We look forward to working with all of you online and seeing many of you at the IGF in November.

Written by Janis Karklins, Ambassador of Latvia, Chair of the MAG

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