using ipv6

How to plan your migration to IPv6

By Mark Dargin

With the depletion of IPv4 addresses, more organizations are encouraged to transition over to using IPv6 addresses. Many organizations are noticing the benefits of the built-in security features of IPv6. Also, enterprise IT managers are observing that their service providers are successfully using IPv6, and this encourages them to move forward with it.

To continue to ignore IPv6 could cause any number of potential problems, including an inability to immediately migrate to IPv6 when there is no longer a choice, loss of internet connectivity, and not being able to compete with organizations whose systems are configured for IPv6.

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How to plan your migration to IPv6

By News Aggregator

By Mark Dargin

With the depletion of IPv4 addresses, more organizations are encouraged to transition over to using IPv6 addresses. Many organizations are noticing the benefits of the built-in security features of IPv6. Also, enterprise IT managers are observing that their service providers are successfully using IPv6, and this encourages them to move forward with it.

To continue to ignore IPv6 could cause any number of potential problems, including an inability to immediately migrate to IPv6 when there is no longer a choice, loss of internet connectivity, and not being able to compete with organizations whose systems are configured for IPv6.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

The post How to plan your migration to IPv6 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Time to consider a move to IPv6

By Mark Dargin

Organizations should consider migrating their network infrastructure and devices over to IPv6. It may be a challenge to persuade leadership to prioritize it over other projects such as cloud computing or big data migrations, but it is essential to start planning for a migration.

Many service providers, such as Comcast, Verizon and AT&T, have already started using IPv6 addresses and are presently encouraging other organizations across the United States to do the same. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has encouraged organizations to move forward with these migrations for over a decade, and with more devices connecting to the internet, the need has increased.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

Time to consider a move to IPv6

By News Aggregator

By Mark Dargin

Organizations should consider migrating their network infrastructure and devices over to IPv6. It may be a challenge to persuade leadership to prioritize it over other projects such as cloud computing or big data migrations, but it is essential to start planning for a migration.

Many service providers, such as Comcast, Verizon and AT&T, have already started using IPv6 addresses and are presently encouraging other organizations across the United States to do the same. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has encouraged organizations to move forward with these migrations for over a decade, and with more devices connecting to the internet, the need has increased.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more here:: www.networkworld.com/category/lan-wan/index.rss

The post Time to consider a move to IPv6 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

New State of IPv6 Deployment Report

By News Aggregator

World IPv6 Launch Logo

By Megan Kruse

Today marks five years since World IPv6 Launch and today the Internet Society released a new landmark paper on the State of IPv6 Deployment 2017. Sometimes IPv6 deployment seems slow, but it really is moving along nicely and when we stop to compare then and now we see huge improvements.

From Mat Ford’s blog post, the highlights of the paper include:

  • IPv6 has increased 3000% since the beginning of World IPv6 Launch five years ago.
  • Deployment is occurring around the globe: Measurements show 37 countries exceed 5% of traffic is IPv6 to major content providers.
  • Over 25% of the Alexa Top 1000 websites are reachable using IPv6.
  • Some networks are now IPv6-only internally (e.g. JPNE, T-Mobile USA, SoftBank), and some major networks are now majority-IPv6 (e.g. RelianceJIO, Verizon Wireless, SkyBroadcasting, XS4ALL).
  • Some organizations are in the process of turning off IPv4 within their networks and/or data centers to reduce network complexity and cost (e.g. T-Mobile, Facebook, LinkedIn).
  • The Internet Society’s core recommendations are to: (a) start now if you haven’t already, (b) use established RFP requirements like RIPE-554: Requirements for IPv6 in ICT Equipment, and (c) take advantage of existing IPv6 deployment information including the Internet Society’s Deploy360 Program.

There’s also already a ITWorld article on the paper including an interview with Fred Baker, Internet Society consultant and author, and Mat Ford, one of our colleagues: http://www.itworld.com/article/3199930/networking/dont-be-left-behind-by-ipv6-deployment-isoc-warns-enterprises.html

We wish all of you a Happy Launchiversary! Where are you on your deployment transition journey? You can visit our main IPv6 Page for all the resources, or use the guided Start Here page to help you. Looking for something specific and can’t find it? Let us know!

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post New State of IPv6 Deployment Report appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Researches Demonstrate How IPv6 Attacks Can Bypass Network Intrusion Detection Systems

With the increasing popularity of IoT devices and the added interest of transition to IPv6, a whole new range of threat vectors are evolving that allow attackers to set up undetectable communications channels across networks. Juha Saarinen reporting in iTnews: “A paper has been published by researchers at the NATO defence alliance’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence and Estonia’s Tallinn University of Technology. It outlines how attackers can create covert data exfiltration channels and system remote control, using IPv6 transition mechanisms. … The researchers developed proofs of concept with tunnel-based IPv6 transition tools over IPv4-only, or IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack networks, that were able to pass traffic undetected by common network intrusion detection systems (NIDS) such as Snort, Suricata, Bro and Moloch.”

Read more here:: www.circleid.com/rss/topics/ipv6

Researches Demonstrate How IPv6 Attacks Can Bypass Network Intrusion Detection Systems

By News Aggregator

With the increasing popularity of IoT devices and the added interest of transition to IPv6, a whole new range of threat vectors are evolving that allow attackers to set up undetectable communications channels across networks. Juha Saarinen reporting in iTnews: “A paper has been published by researchers at the NATO defence alliance’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence and Estonia’s Tallinn University of Technology. It outlines how attackers can create covert data exfiltration channels and system remote control, using IPv6 transition mechanisms. … The researchers developed proofs of concept with tunnel-based IPv6 transition tools over IPv4-only, or IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack networks, that were able to pass traffic undetected by common network intrusion detection systems (NIDS) such as Snort, Suricata, Bro and Moloch.”

Read more here:: www.circleid.com/rss/topics/ipv6

The post Researches Demonstrate How IPv6 Attacks Can Bypass Network Intrusion Detection Systems appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Cosmote introduces IPv6

By Kevin Meynell

Cosmote

There’s recently been a rash of network operators announcing deployment of IPv6, and Cosmote recently joined this growing list. Cosmote is the largest mobile network operator in Greece, and is a fully owned subsidiary of the Hellenic Telecommunications Organization (OTE), the incumbent telecommunications provider. It counts approximately 15 million customers across Greece, Albania and Romania.

The Cosmote announcement suggests its motivations for introducing IPv6 are to provide scalability to meet the challenges of a growing number of mobile devices, the Internet-of-Things and sensor networks. It also aims to improve network management and routing efficiency, as well as faster and more reliable implementation of new services.

No action is required from Cosmote customers and there will be no differentiation in services or tariffs when using IPv6. Most of 4G devices are already compatible with IPv6, whilst upgrades will be available for older devices.

We also aim to help, so please take a look at our Start Here page to understand how you can get started with IPv6.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

Cosmote introduces IPv6

By News Aggregator

Cosmote

By Kevin Meynell

There’s recently been a rash of network operators announcing deployment of IPv6, and Cosmote recently joined this growing list. Cosmote is the largest mobile network operator in Greece, and is a fully owned subsidiary of the Hellenic Telecommunications Organization (OTE), the incumbent telecommunications provider. It counts approximately 15 million customers across Greece, Albania and Romania.

The Cosmote announcement suggests its motivations for introducing IPv6 are to provide scalability to meet the challenges of a growing number of mobile devices, the Internet-of-Things and sensor networks. It also aims to improve network management and routing efficiency, as well as faster and more reliable implementation of new services.

No action is required from Cosmote customers and there will be no differentiation in services or tariffs when using IPv6. Most of 4G devices are already compatible with IPv6, whilst upgrades will be available for older devices.

We also aim to help, so please take a look at our Start Here page to understand how you can get started with IPv6.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/

The post Cosmote introduces IPv6 appeared on IPv6.net.

Read more here:: IPv6 News Aggregator

Why you need IPv6 and the sad tale of an ISP that didn’t deploy it

By Kevin Meynell

IPv6-image

We’ve recently come across a couple of videos about IPv6 that we think are worth sharing.

The first comes from Ethan Banks of Packet Pushers who makes the case for why you finally really do need IPv6. Here he argues that where IPv6 is not deployed, it’s starting to have a real business impact in a number of regional markets. As IPv4 reaches a stage of imminent exhaustion, it’s becoming necessary to buy address space at a significant cost, or use multiple layers of Network Address Translation that degrade performance and break applications.

In many cases, users already have IPv6 capability as many mobile operators have been deploying IPv6 for a while, whilst other ISPs particularly in US but also parts of Europe, are also rolling it out. Many operating systems including Windows, even prefer using IPv6 for transport, so there no reason not to support IPv6 on your web sites and other services. Indeed, you’re increasingly likely to be cutting off potential users if you don’t.

Conversely, take a look at the sad tale of an ISP that didn’t deploy IPv6 that was produced by the University of Guadalajara for LACNIC 23. This relates the tale of a large incumbent ISP that decided not to deploy IPv6 whilst a smaller one did. The result is that it loses customers be cause it no longer has sufficient IPv4 addresses, it cannot participate in state tenders that require IPv6 to be supported, and eventually its engineers and then sales team leave for the smaller ISP. Whilst real names have not been used in the video, it’s purportedly based on a true story and should therefore serve as a cautionary tale.

One more video to view if you’re interested in deploying IPv6 is Clinton Work’s presentation at NANOG 65 on deploying IPv6 at scale. Here he presents TELUS’s experiences of planning and deploying IPv6, the technical and training challenges, and their reasons for doing it.

We at Deploy360 want to support those interested in deploying IPv6, so please take a look at our Start Here page to understand how you can get started.

Read more here:: www.internetsociety.org/deploy360/blog/feed/