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TiTAN AI Robot uses facial and speech recognition to read your emotions and make suitable recommendations

By Zenobia Hegde

TiTAN AI Robot from TiTAN Platform™, a smart content and device company, not only responds to verbal requests (What’s the weather forecast? Did the Cubs win? Play Bob Dylan! Turn on the house lights!) but also gets visual (showing your calendar for the day, home security cameras, your BFF on a video call,streaming content and more). In addition, it can interpret your moods through facial and speech recognition and will make movie, music and food recommendations accordingly.

Key features include a voice assistant, video and audio streaming, voice calling, app monitoring, search, visual display, and connectivity to smart home “Internet of Things” (IoT) solutions such as digitally controlled lights, thermostat and home security systems. The device also includes a swivel base that allows it to follow user movement and offers multiple colour designs for personalisation.

In addition, the TiTAN AI Robot can be used to access and control the company’s new TiTAN Core all-in-one smart home and entertainment hubs. These whole-house gateways enable consumers to manage smart home systems as well as retrieve videos, music, podcasts, e-books, games, VR and other digital content from a single device for the first time, bringing never-before-possible simplicity to the connected home.

“TiTAN AI is helping us rethink how we use devices through smart interaction,” said Brian Eble, president/CMO, Titan Platform US. “The ability of the Titan AI to understand our moods and behaviours is a real game changer in the industry, providing recommendations on music, movies, devices and more to reflect our current lifestyle.”

TiTAN AI Robot will be available at shop.titanplatform.us and at select retailers in Q2 2018.

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IoT botnets will force governments to regulate IoT device manufacturers

By Zenobia Hegde

As IoT botnet attacks continue to grow in size and effectiveness in 2018, the damage they cause will force the IoT manufacturing industry to add stronger security to their products or eventually result in governments addressing IoT security with regulation, according to researchers at WatchGuard Technologies.

“The Mirai botnet showed the world just how powerful an army of IoT devices can be to launch successful, record-breaking DDoS attacks against popular websites like Twitter, Reddit and Netflix,” said Corey Nachreiner, CTO at WatchGuard Technologies.

While the number of IoT devices with weak or non-existent security, both in development and deployment, continues to grow, attackers have already started improving on the Mirai source code, which will mean larger and stronger botnets in 2018. For example, the Reaper botnet actively exploits common vulnerabilities in IoT devices to gain access to the devices instead of relying on a hard-coded credential list.

“Potential IoT device regulations will most likely affect manufacturers of consumer-grade IoT devices first, since the end users of these products don’t have the knowledge to secure their own devices,” says Nachreiner. “These regulations will probably mirror similar liability-oriented regulations in other industries, where the manufacturer is held at least partially accountable for flaws in their products.”

See the of WatchGuard predictions videos here.

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Western Digital Empowers Consumers to Take Control of Their Digital Content

By IoT – Internet of Things

Western Digital Corporation, a global data storage technology and solutions leader, recently launched My Cloud™ Home, a new personal cloud storage solution that empowers consumers to take control of their often-scattered digital content. With the My Cloud Home solution, consumers can easily aggregate all their photos, videos and files from their smart phones, computers, USB […]

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Face authentication and the future of security

By Zenobia Hegde

Apple’s iPhone X has given us a glimpse into the future of personal data security. By 2020 we’ll see billions of smart devices being used as mobile face authentication systems, albeit with varying degrees of security. The stuff of science fiction for years, face recognition will surpass other legacy biometric login solutions,such as fingerprint and iris scans, because of a new generation of AI-driven algorithms, says Kevin Alan Tussy, CEO of FaceTec.

The face recognition space had never received more attention than after the launch of Face ID, but with the internet now home to dozens of spoof videos fooling Face ID with twins, relatives and even olives for eyes, the expensive hardware solution has left many questioning if this is just another missed opportunity to replace passwords.

Face Recognition is a biometric method of identifying an authorised user by comparing the user’s face to the biometric data stored in the original enrolment. Once a positive match is made and the user’s liveness is confirmed the system grants account access.

A step up in security, Face Authentication (Identification + Liveness Detection), offers important and distinct security benefits: no PIN or password memorisation is required, there is no shared secret that can be stolen from a server, and the certainty the correct user is logging in is very high.

Apple’s embrace of Face ID has elevated face recognition into the public consciousness, and when compared to mobile fingerprint recognition, face recognition is far superior in terms of accuracy. According to Apple, their new face scanning technology is 20-times more secure than the fingerprint recognition currently used in the iPhone 8 (Touch ID) and Samsung S8. Using your face to unlock your phone is, of course, a great step forward, but is that all a face biometric can do? Not by a long shot.

While the goal of every new biometric has been to replace passwords, none have succeeded because most rely on special hardware that lacks liveness detection. Liveness detection, the key attribute of Authentication, verifies the correct user is actually present and alive at the time of login.

True 3D face authentication requires: identity verification plus depth sensing plus liveness detection. This means photos or videos cannot spoof the system, nor animated images like those created by CrazyTalk; and even 3D representations of a user like projections on foam heads, custom masks, and wax figures are rebuffed.

With the average price of a smartphone hovering around £150 (€170.58), expensive hardware-based solutions, no matter how good they get, won’t ever see widespread adoption. For a face authentication solution to be universally adopted it must be a 100% software solution that runs on the billions of devices with standard cameras that are already in use, and it must be be more secure than current legacy options (like fingerprint and 2D face).

A software solution like ZoOm from FaceTec can be quickly and easily integrated into nearly any app on just about any existing smart device. ZoOm can be deployed to millions of mobile users literally overnight, and provides […]

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Orange announces the Open Source release of its OCast software technology

By Zenobia Hegde

OCast is a software technology that allows you to use a smartphone to play videos on devices including TV set-top boxes, TV Sticks or TVs and control playback of the video (pause, fast forward and rewind, for example). Beyond video, OCast can also play and control slideshows, playlists and web apps.

The end user can browse and explore their content libraries via their preferred interface, either the screen on their smartphone or on their tablet. They can also watch their video content in the most convenient way – on their TV.

With a single application they can watch content on a mobile or tablet outside or on their TV at home – the best of both worlds.

All operators that offer TV access will be able to offer their customers a range of mobile applications to cast videos to their TV by including OCast in their set-top boxes. This is very easy and requires no specific development.

Developers of mobile applications that incorporate long videos will offer their customers, as well as VOD and SVOD content providers will be able to provide viewing greater comfort like that of the big screen TV.

Thierry Souche, senior vice president Orange Labs Services and Group CIO at Orange, said: “The release of OCast as open source software is a milestone in Orange’s technical strategy, enabling us to accelerate the development of these services available via the set-top box, as well as creating a virtuous circle with other operators to create a new video services ecosystem.”

This technology is now available as open source. The code is published without licence fees and with easy integration in operators’ set-top boxes and equipment, as well as in the applications of video service providers.

The operator retains control over the applications authorised to operate on their set-top box, which enables them to maintain and increase the content value chain.

Other operators have already started with the technology, starting with Deutsche Telekom, which has “tested the OCast technology already in the early stages and was convinced of its maturity and value proposition for the consumer,” according to Randolph Nikutta, Interactive High End Media leader at Deutsche Telekom Innovation Laboratories.

Paul Molinier

Orange is joining forces with its subsidiary Viaccess-Orca, specialising in content management, distribution and security solutions, which will integrate this technology in its range of solutions for TV operators.

“We are delighted to support our TV operator clients in the implementation of this new technology by providing our content protection solutions (DRM) and more generally, our security expertise. We will enable them to extend the availability of their TV services offers to all screens, with an extremely quick turnaround time,” says Paul Molinier, chief executive of Viaccess-Orca.

Orange is proud to announce the Open Source release of its OCast software technology to give all operators and mobile application developers the opportunity to take advantage of these TV service and content developments.

Orange’s renewed collaboration with its subsidiary, Viaccess-Orca, is an important step for everyone involved in content security and protection.

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